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Ep. 2: The Pioneers of Radio (Bill Bryson's Appliance of Science)

Length: 22 mins
4 out of 5 stars (35 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Bill tells the story of the Italian Navy Detector that was devised by a humble scientist, Jagadish Chandra Bose, who could be regarded as one of India's greatest minds. And the more famous, Guillermo Marconi, and his quest to invent the Marconi Short-Wave Beam Transmitter. He is joined by John Liffen, the Science Museum's Curator of Communications.
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Trouble opening

I could not open any episodes after the first one. Too bad, I found it interesting and love Bryson.

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Really enjoyable series

This series is very enjoyable and the experts that Bill Bryson talks to really ties the different objects together really well. Well worth the listen

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  • EvaGM
  • 10-05-18

Light and entertaining.

An easy listen, garnished with entertaining anecdotes about the people behind these scientific achievements. Can't award the five stars because the host and guests sound a bit too much like primary school teachers making things very, very simple for children to understand. I personally wouldn't have minded a bit more technical detail; on the other hand, the historical context is well presented.