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Publisher's Summary

A moving, compelling memoir about growing up and escaping the tragic legacy of mental illness, suicide, addiction, and depression in one of America's most famous families: the Hemingways.

She opens her eyes. The room is dark. She hears yelling, smashed plates, and wishes it was all a terrible dream. But it isn't. This is what it was like growing up as a Hemingway. In this deeply moving, searingly honest new memoir, actress and mental health icon Mariel Hemingway shares in candid detail the story of her troubled childhood in a famous family haunted by depression, alcoholism, illness, and suicide. Born just a few months after her grandfather, Ernest Hemingway, shot himself, it was Mariel's mission as a girl to escape the desperate cycle of severe mental health issues that had plagued generations of her family. Surrounded by a family tortured by alcoholism (Mariel's parents), depression (her sister, Margaux), suicide (her grandfather and four other members of her family), schizophrenia (her sister, Muffet), and cancer (her mother), it was all the young Mariel could do to keep her head. In a compassionate voice, she reveals her painful struggle to stay sane as the youngest child in her family, coping with the chaos by becoming obsessive about her food, schedule, and organization.

The twisted legacy of her family has never quite let go of Mariel, but in this memoir she opens up about her claustrophobic marriage, her faltering acting career, and her turning to spiritual healers and charlatans for solace. Mariel has ultimately written a story of triumph about learning to overcome her family's demons and developing love and deep compassion for them. At last she can tell the true story of the tragedies and troubles of the Hemingway family, and she delivers an audiobook that beckons comparisons with Mary Karr and Jeanette Walls.

©2015 Mariel Hemingway (P)2015 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Tragically picturesque and makes no apologies

This book was incredibly insightful into the ecosystem of dysfunction within a family affected by alcoholism--but moreover, mental illness. Having been previously afflicted, Mariel effectively disburses the spectrum of potential lifelong challenges of having been a Hemingway survivor. She is fair and humble in telling her personal story, without the mellow dramatics. In my opinion it would have been okay for her to reveal more in her performance. We never get over losing a sibling-whether it be to suicide or Schizoeffective disorder. My experience is in the latter. True presence is felt throughout the book and she paints an excellent
portrait of herself, her family, and of her world in relation to such dysfunction.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

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perfect story to read over and over.

What made the experience of listening to Out Came the Sun the most enjoyable?

enjoy reading about recovery from drugs of all sorts, esp. over-eating.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Mariell because I feel like her sometimes

Which scene was your favorite?

fighting before wedding

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

addictions

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Tough Memories Written Well

Life has been tough for Mariel Hemingway. She witnessed unspeakable things growing up and was able to overcome several disorders triggered by her parent's upbringing. I look up to her for the decision to write her story, and for the strength she had to collect to narrate it. "Out Came the Sun" is very well written and I highly recommend it to all.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Loved this book!

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Mariel's fascinating story is very well written and she is the best narrator I have ever heard. I will be buying and listening to her other books.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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Just as real as it gets

Loved this thoughtful and moving account of a true family struggle with dysfunction. Profound, mesmerizing.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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it's not what I expected

I'm sure it was because of my own error in not reading the reviews before I purchased. I was expecting more of a history and a connection to the writer Ernest Hemingway. I was given the personal life story of his granddaughter. I will say even though this was not my preferred type of book to read, I was impressed that the author was also the narrator. I believe that gave it a more Personal Touch

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Don't waste your time

What a boring memoir written by a another self absorbed actress. Talk about trading off your family name! Just another story about a dysfunctional family. There is nothing special about Mariel's journey except that she is a Hemingway.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Put Out the Sun

What disappointed you about Out Came the Sun?

There are all kinds of unloving/dysfunctional family situations that bring people to search for healing and the camaraderie of others. This "memoir" promising a story of victory over a legacy of mental illness is more a vehicle to petty and immature criticism of others including her deceased sister, an attack upon those who cannot respond including an insinuation that her father sexually abused her sisters admitting she had no supportive facts. Shameful.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Crystal
  • oakland, CA, United States
  • 05-27-15

Admire the honesty.

I listened to Brook Shields' memoir and was horrified at the lack of insight. Mariel seems to have tried harder at self-analysis. Although, frankly, I strongly believe that all of us pay for the sins of our fathers - for some the pay back is generational. It's a part of life that few are spared. We either spend our lives trying not to turn out like our parents, or we spend them trying to live up to the standards they set for us.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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We don't stand alone

It was a insight on what most children go though. Thank you for sharing your story. Going into the dark places of your life and your family members, when being so private not letting people know about so much. Your book is teaching and giving important information, that we need to know!! Bless Your Heart!

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • ania
  • 09-20-17

well written but not very involving

The book is well written and showing that the author is very self reflective. However, I struggled to get involved in the story.

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  • P. Howden
  • 11-30-16

Gripping story.

This story takes off from the beginning and is gripping to the end. Mariel talks about the alcoholism, mental illness & suicides in her family. It is an enlightening listen for anyone who has an alcoholic parent. I also love the fact that it isn't based on the 12 steps but is just a factual account of growing up in an alcoholic family. The only reason that I didn't give it 5 stars all the way is because Mariel recommends AA at the end of the book to help alcoholics, and I hate AA with a passion! AA is a cult that plays with the alcoholic's mind, and makes more people sick than it helps. Fortunately this book only mentions AA at the very end, & there is no talk of it any where else in the book. I do highly recomend this book overall!

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  • Rah
  • 10-24-16

Good bio

I enjoyed her story and performance... it was not extraordinary but entertaining and insightful. Her outlook was thoughtful but she minimises her own trauma and mental battles. as with all of us it is easier to see others than to notice yourself.