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Publisher's Summary

Inspired by the groundbreaking A History of the World in 100 Objects, this book draws on the unique collections of The Strong museum in Rochester, New York, to chronicle the evolution of video games, from Pong to first-person shooters, told through the stories of dozens of objects essential to the field’s creation and development.

Drawing on the World Video Game Hall of Fame’s unmatched collection of video game artifacts, this fascinating history offers an expansive look at the development of one of the most popular and influential activities of the modern world: video gaming.

Sixty-four unique objects tell the story of the video game from inception to today. Pithy, in-depth essays examine each object’s significance to video game play - what it has contributed to the history of gaming - as well as the greater culture.

A History of Video Games in 64 Objects explains how the video game has transformed over time. Inside, you’ll find a wide range of intriguing topics, including:

  • The first edition of Dungeons & Dragons - the ancestor of computer role-playing games
  • The Oregon Trail and the development of educational gaming
  • The Atari 2600 and the beginning of the console revolution
  • A World of Warcraft server blade and massively multiplayer Online games
  • Minecraft - the backlash against the studio system
  • The rise of women in gaming represented by pioneering American video game designers Carol Shaw and Roberta Williams’ game development materials
  • The prototype Skylanders Portal of Power that spawned the Toys-to-Life video game phenomenon and shook up the marketplace
  • And so much more

A panorama of unforgettable anecdotes and factoids, A History of Video Games in 64 Objects is a treasure trove for gamers and pop culture fans. Let the gaming begin!

©2018 The Strong (P)2018 HarperCollins Publishers

What listeners say about A History of Video Games in 64 Objects

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Video game history + leftist politics

Can anything on Audible just tell the history of something without inserting a bunch of a leftist politics? If they cut the politics out of this book it would probably remove an hour or more from the run time. Otherwise it’s a pretty decent read - but having read just about everything else out there, there is nothing new here, mostly the same stories you’ve heard before rehashed, which isn’t a bad thing since it will be new to most people.

Also the author of this book seems to think the movie Hidden Figures is real. It’s not - the book is real - the movie is a fantasy Hollywood version “inspired” by “true”events.

Overall the book is fine - but could have been much better without the needless identity politics which do noting but distract from the stories. To be clear the politics aren’t overwhelming - it’s just completely unnecessary and distracting. If you’re a leftist then this is just your world and I doubt you even notice it. But if you’re not a leftist - you’ll notice and get annoyed as well. Either way you can enjoy the rest of the book - but it’s just unneeded friction.

The reader did a good job, he sounded professional and pronounced most things correctly. Oh no, did I assume he’s a he? This author is going to be disgusted that’d I’d dare assume someone’s gender.

5 people found this helpful

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Great Book

First I have to say I love The Strong National Museum Of Play. When I heard of this book I knew I had to get it. I enjoyed the book it was an enjoyable listen. I found the object concept to be an interesting way to combine the items you can see at the museum and the history of video games. While at rhe museum you can see the item & get a brief history of that item, this gives the deep dive in to the objects & how the way it relates to other video game items & history.
All said I was upset by a couple minor thing. The Pronunciation of Ralph Baer's name. And Sega was Service Games not System Games before it was Sega. It my seem like nit-picking but little things like that make me question other fact I did know that if the book is correct or not.
Recommend this book to any video game history fan.

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Loved every minute!

A fascinating look at some of the most influential objects that shaped the landscape of the videogame industry then and now. I've read/listened to a few "history of videogames" type books before and I still felt like I learned a lot. Ray does a great job narrating (he's easily become my favorite narrator), and my only complaint is that I wish it were longer.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 04-05-21

Good overview, not that in depth

It's an interesting overview of some of the most important games or artifacts in video game history but it's not that in depth. Each "object" only gets a short section (each section was 5 - 10 minutes. The narration by Ray Chase is solid though).

It's a good starting point to go more in depth though if you do like some of the games, people or technologies talked about. I liked in particular that most of the focus was on early games and technologies before the 90's and I learned about some games or machines that I'd never heard of before.