Showing results by narrator "Macat.com"

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    • A Macat Analysis of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex

    • By: Rachele Dini
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 12
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 9
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 10

    De Beauvoir's book charted the oppression of "the second sex" in terms never before seen in the academic world. Her most startling theory became a rallying cry for the feminist movement: "One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman." She argued that gender identity was shaped by upbringing in a world ruled by men. A leading light in the existentialist movement, de Beauvoir applied the radical philosophy of personal choice and freedom to argue that women were subjugated in every area of life.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Hannah Arendt's 'The Human Condition'

    • By: Sahar Aurore Saeidnia, Anthony Lang
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 39 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 10
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 9
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 9

    In her 1958 work, political theorist Hannah Arendt asks two fundamental questions: "Under what conditions do politics emerge?" and "Under what conditions can politics be eliminated?" In searching for answers she turns some long-established thinking on its head. Ancient political philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle believed that a life spent thinking was more important than an active life of labor, work, and action. But Arendt argues that political action is every bit as important as political thinking.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Michel Foucault's The History of Sexuality Vol. 1: The Will to Knowledge

    • By: Chiara Briganti, Rachele Dini
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 58 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 6
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 5

    Michel Foucault had already written extensively about medicine, madness, and prisons. But in the latter days of his career, he turned to the subject of sexuality, planning six volumes on the subject. He completed three before dying of an AIDS-related illness in 1984. Foucault's History of Sexuality Vol. 1 is a study of the evolution of cultural ideas about sex in the West since the end of the 17th century. Volume two looked at attitudes toward sex in ancient Greece; volume three investigated sex in ancient Rome.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason

    • By: Michael O'Sullivan
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 6
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 5

    More than two centuries after its initial publication in 1781, Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason remains perhaps the most influential text in modern philosophy. Kant himself claimed his work as a revolutionary document and insisted that it changed the discipline of philosophy as thoroughly as Copernicus had changed astronomy 300 years earlier, when he said the Earth revolved around the sun and not the other way round.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Frantz Fanon's Black Skin, White Masks

    • By: Rachele Dini
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 6

    Frantz Fanon's Black Skin, White Masks offers a radical analysis of the psychological effects of colonization on the colonized. Born in 1925 on the island of Martinique - at the time a French colony - Fanon witnessed firsthand the abuses of white colonizers and the system's effects on his country. His revulsion was only confirmed later in life when he worked as a psychiatrist in Algeria, another French colony. Fanon's work played a pivotal role in the civil rights movements of the 1960s and was later taken up by scholars of postcolonialist studies.

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • Don't waste money on this!

    • By joshua eli scuteri on 02-07-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • An Analysis of Philip Zimbardo's The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil

    • By: Alexander J. O'Connor
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 54 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 2

    Born in 1933, Philip Zimbardo is a renowned and controversial American social psychologist who is fascinated by why people can sometimes behave in awful ways. Some psychologists believe people who commit cruelty are innately evil. Zimbardo disagrees. In his 2007 book, The Lucifer Effect, he argued that it is the power of situations around us that can cause otherwise good people to commit "evil", citing many historical examples to illustrate his point.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Eric Hoffer's The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements

    • By: Jonah S. Rubin
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 40 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 19
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 16
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 16

    A self-educated man, Eric Hoffer was most likely born in 1898. He wrote in his spare time after doing shifts on the San Francisco docks, where he continued to work, even after becoming a successful author. Hoffer began writing The True Believer in the 1940s, as Nazism and fascism spread across Europe. Most analysts who were trying to work out how these movements became so powerful focused on their leaders and the ideas they trumpeted.

    • 2 out of 5 stars
    • Hoffer not analyzed

    • By Lawrence A. on 09-20-16

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of G. W. F. Hegel Phenomenology of Spirit

    • By: Ian Jackson
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 1

    In his 1807 work Phenomenology of Spirit, G. W. F. Hegel introduced the world to his philosophical system. His most influential work - and the culmination of the German Idealist movement begun in the late 18th century as a response to the works of Immanuel Kant - the book remains one of the undisputed classics of Western thought.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Samuel Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order

    • By: Riley Quinn
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 34 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 7

    In his 1996 book The Clash Of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order, American political scientist Samuel Huntington sets out his vision of the post-Cold War world. While the era from 1945 to 1989 was shaped by ideological conflict (communism vs. capitalism), Huntington predicts a future of cultural conflict.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Daniel Jonah Goldhagen's Hitler's Willing Executioners

    • By: Simon Taylor, Tom Stammers
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 2

    American author Daniel Jonah Goldhagen's 1996 work, Hitler's Willing Executioners, is one of the most controversial history books of modern times. While most historians have sought to explain the horror of the Holocaust by focusing on Nazi leaders and their ideologies, Goldhagen set out to investigate whether ordinary Germans enthusiastically embraced their goals. His conclusion: "eliminationist anti-Semitism" - a genocidal hatred of Jews unique to Germany - caused the Holocaust.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth

    • By: Riley Quinn
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 19
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 14
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 15

    Published in 1961, the year of Frantz Fanon's death, The Wretched of the Earth is both a powerful analysis of the psychological effects of colonization and a rallying cry for violent uprising and independence. The book rejects colonial assumptions that the people of colonized countries need to be guided by their European colonizers because they are somehow less evolved or civilized. Fanon argues that violence is justified to purge colonialism not just from the countries themselves, but from the very souls of their inhabitants.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Take THAT Amazon's Suggestion Engine!

    • By Dan Collins on 12-17-16

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of C. Wright Mills's The Sociological Imagination

    • By: Robert Easthope
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 55 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    When American sociologist C. Wright Mills's The Sociological Imagination was first published in 1959, it provoked much hostile reaction. This was understandable: the book was a hard-hitting attack on how sociology was practiced - and on a number of leading sociologists. Mills was a fierce critic of both modern capitalism and Soviet-style authoritarianism, and argued that the sociology profession failed to look at how people's problems are connected to the structures of the society in which they live.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Antonio Gramsci's Prison Notebooks

    • By: Lorenzo Fusaro, Jason Xidias
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 6
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 6

    First published in 1948, Antonio Gramsci's Prison Notebooks is an important Marxist work that says we must understand societies both in terms of their economic relationships and their cultural beliefs. Gramsci wanted to explore why Russia had undergone a socialist revolution in 1917 while other European countries had not. So he developed the concept of hegemony, which is the idea that those who hold power in a society can maintain and use that power because of their own grip on cultural values and economic relationships.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of C. L. R. James's The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution

    • By: Nick Broten
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 6
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 4

    Published in 1938, Cyril Lionel Robert (C. L. R.) James' The Black Jacobins is the little-known story of the only successful slave revolution known in history. It was this 12-year struggle of the African slaves in the French colony of San Domingo that led to the establishment of the Republic of Haiti in 1804. The uprising was inspired by the ideals of the French Revolution that had begun in 1789, just two years before, and in this work James goes to great lengths to show the relationship between the two upheavals.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Michel Foucault's Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison

    • By: Meghan Kallman, Rachele Dini
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 49 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 10
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 9

    How do those in power exercise that power over a state's citizens? French thinker Michel Foucault's 1975 work Discipline and Punish looks to answer this question by investigating the prison system. Foucault does not believe that the modern-day system developed out of reformers' humanitarian concerns. He argues that prison both created and then became part of a bigger system of surveillance that extends throughout society.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Milgram's Obedience to Authority

    • By: Dr. Mark Gridley, Dr. William Jenkins
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      2.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      3 out of 5 stars 3

    Stanley Milgram was a young researcher at Yale in the 1960s when he recruited volunteers to help in a psychology experiment. These volunteers were asked to give electric shocks to "learners" whenever they got an answer to a question wrong. The "learners" were in on the deception, and were not actually receiving shocks, but the volunteers were unaware of this. To widespread surprise, Milgram reported that 40 to 65 percent of his volunteers did what the researcher told them, and gave the maximum shock to the "learners" even when they screamed in pain.

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • A bad set of Cliff notes

    • By ERICH F DEAGOSTINO on 12-08-16

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Judith Butler's Gender Trouble

    • By: Tim Smith-Laing
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 41 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 19
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 14
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 14

    Philosopher Judith Butler's 1990 work, Gender Trouble, shook the foundations of feminist theory and changed the conversation about gender. While many thinkers already accepted that "gender" was a category constructed by society rather than defined by one's genitalia, Butler went further and argued that gender is performative - it exists only in the acts that express it. Society determines that wearing makeup is "feminine" - but some men wear makeup. Are they "women"?

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • Superficial and repetitive

    • By Elizabeth on 10-02-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's The Social Contract

    • By: James Hill
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    Geneva-born thinker Jean-Jacques Rousseau's famous work of political philosophy from 1762 is based on a give-and-take theory of the relation between individual freedom and social order: the social contract that gives the work its name. Rousseau thinks about the issue by starting with what is known as the state of nature, a lawless condition where people are free to do what they like, governed only by their own instinctive sense of justice. People are free, but they are also vulnerable to chaos.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's Can the Subaltern Speak?

    • By: Graham K. Riach
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 2 hrs and 11 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 9
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 9

    Can the Subaltern Speak? is a classic of postcolonial studies, the discipline that examines the impact of colonial control on countries that gained their independence from European powers from the 1940s onwards. The essay, written in 1988 by Calcutta-born scholar Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, argues that a core problem for the poorest and most marginalized in society (the subalterns) is that they have no platform to express their concerns, and no voice to affect policy debates or demand a fairer share.

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • Repetitive and misses the essence

    • By Mariano Desmaras on 04-02-18

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Abraham H. Maslow's A Theory of Human Motivation

    • By: Stoyan Stoyanov
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 9
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 8
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 8

    US psychologist Abraham Maslow's 1943 essay "A Theory of Human Motivation" established his idea of humanistic psychology as a "third force" in the field. He outlined a new approach to understanding the mind, saying humans are motivated by their need to satisfy a series of hierarchical needs, starting with the most essential first. He thought it important for the advancement of psychology to identify, group, and rank them in terms of priority.

    • 3 out of 5 stars
    • Did not add anything new.

    • By AT Benedetti on 09-21-17

    Regular price: $6.95

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