Showing results by author "Alexander J. O'Connor"

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    • An Analysis of Philip Zimbardo's The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil

    • By: Alexander J. O'Connor
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 54 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 4

    Born in 1933, Philip Zimbardo is a renowned and controversial American social psychologist who is fascinated by why people can sometimes behave in awful ways. Some psychologists believe people who commit cruelty are innately evil. Zimbardo disagrees. In his 2007 book, The Lucifer Effect, he argued that it is the power of situations around us that can cause otherwise good people to commit "evil", citing many historical examples to illustrate his point.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Leon Festinger's A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance

    • By: Camille Morvan, Alexander J. O'Connor
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 5

    Why do we want to justify our decisions, even if they appear to be irrational? The answer lies in cognitive dissonance, the mental discomfort we experience when we hold two contradictory beliefs at the same time. In A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, first published in 1957, American social psychologist Leon Festinger investigates the problem. Festinger puts forward the idea that we have developed mechanisms to try to deal with the stress brought on by cognitive dissonance.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Oliver Sacks's The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales

    • By: Dario Krpan, Alexander J. O'Connor
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    Neurologist Oliver Sacks' 1985 book The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat challenges the impersonal approach doctors took to patient care and paved the way for a new literary genre: popular science. At the time of its publication, neurologists and physicians relied mainly on clinical studies and their own expertise to set the course of treatment. Sacks found this inhumane and developed a very different approach, clearly demonstrated in The Man Who Mistook His Wife.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Alan D. Baddeley and Graham Hitch's "Working Memory"

    • By: Birgit Koopmann-Holm, Alexander J. O'Connor
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 39 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 3
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    In the 1960s, researchers into human memory began to understand memory as operating under two systems. The first was a short-term system handling information for mere seconds. The second was a long-term system capable of managing information indefinitely. They also discovered, however, that short-term memory was not simply a filing cabinet, but was actively working on cognitive - or mental - tasks. This is how the phrase "working memory" developed.

    Regular price: $6.95