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    • A Macat Analysis of Charles P. Kindleberger's Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises

    • By: Nick Burton
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 51 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 23
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 22
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 21

    When Charles P. Kindleberger's Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises was first published in 1978, the world was entering a new period of global economic turbulence. Established economists based their analyses on the assumption that investors act rationally, and these economists often communicated their ideas with dry, technical language. Kindleberger rebelled against convention. Using a more literary and descriptive style, he came up with a new view.

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • This is a "cliff notes' version of the book

    • By C. Tanner on 10-12-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of C. L. R. James's The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution

    • By: Nick Broten
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 5

    Published in 1938, Cyril Lionel Robert (C. L. R.) James' The Black Jacobins is the little-known story of the only successful slave revolution known in history. It was this 12-year struggle of the African slaves in the French colony of San Domingo that led to the establishment of the Republic of Haiti in 1804. The uprising was inspired by the ideals of the French Revolution that had begun in 1789, just two years before, and in this work James goes to great lengths to show the relationship between the two upheavals.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Leon Festinger's A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance

    • By: Camille Morvan, Alexander J. O'Connor
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 5

    Why do we want to justify our decisions, even if they appear to be irrational? The answer lies in cognitive dissonance, the mental discomfort we experience when we hold two contradictory beliefs at the same time. In A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, first published in 1957, American social psychologist Leon Festinger investigates the problem. Festinger puts forward the idea that we have developed mechanisms to try to deal with the stress brought on by cognitive dissonance.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth

    • By: Riley Quinn
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 22
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 15
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 16

    Published in 1961, the year of Frantz Fanon's death, The Wretched of the Earth is both a powerful analysis of the psychological effects of colonization and a rallying cry for violent uprising and independence. The book rejects colonial assumptions that the people of colonized countries need to be guided by their European colonizers because they are somehow less evolved or civilized. Fanon argues that violence is justified to purge colonialism not just from the countries themselves, but from the very souls of their inhabitants.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Take THAT Amazon's Suggestion Engine!

    • By Dan Collins on 12-17-16

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Eric Hoffer's The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements

    • By: Jonah S. Rubin
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 40 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 26
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 22
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 22

    A self-educated man, Eric Hoffer was most likely born in 1898. He wrote in his spare time after doing shifts on the San Francisco docks, where he continued to work, even after becoming a successful author. Hoffer began writing The True Believer in the 1940s, as Nazism and fascism spread across Europe. Most analysts who were trying to work out how these movements became so powerful focused on their leaders and the ideas they trumpeted.

    • 2 out of 5 stars
    • Hoffer not analyzed

    • By Lawrence A. on 09-20-16

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of David Graeber's Debt: The First 5,000 Years

    • By: Sulaiman Hakemy
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 4

    David Graeber's 2011 book, Debt: The First 5,000 Years, seeks to overturn hundreds of years of economic theory, specifically the idea that people have a natural inclination to trade with each other and that the concept of money developed spontaneously to overcome the inefficiencies of a bartering system. The US-born social activist uses his training as an anthropologist to trace the histories of money and of debt and reaches the conclusion that money was in fact created by the state as a means of exploiting the poor.

    • 3 out of 5 stars
    • Why repeat chapter name twice?

    • By Marcin on 12-20-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Ludwig Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations

    • By: Michael O'Sullivan
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 10
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 7

    In Philosophical Investigations, the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein presents a radical approach to problems in the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind. In fact, he sets out a radically new conception of philosophy itself. Published in 1953, two years after Wittgenstein's death, many still consider it one of the finest works of 20th century philosophy.

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • Disappointing

    • By Elizabeth on 10-07-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Antonio Gramsci's Prison Notebooks

    • By: Lorenzo Fusaro, Jason Xidias
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 9
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 7

    First published in 1948, Antonio Gramsci's Prison Notebooks is an important Marxist work that says we must understand societies both in terms of their economic relationships and their cultural beliefs. Gramsci wanted to explore why Russia had undergone a socialist revolution in 1917 while other European countries had not. So he developed the concept of hegemony, which is the idea that those who hold power in a society can maintain and use that power because of their own grip on cultural values and economic relationships.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics

    • By: Giovanni Gellera, Jon W. Thompson
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 52 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 6
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 4

    According to Aristotle, the ultimate human good is eudaimonia, an ancient Greek word that can be translated as happiness, or flourishing. Eudaimonia comes from a life of virtuous (or good) action. Virtues such as justice, restraint, and practical wisdom cannot simply be taught - they must be developed over time by cultivating virtuous habits. The making of virtuous choices can be developed by using practical wisdom and by recognizing the desirable middle ground between extremes of human behavior.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Ferdinand de Saussure's Course in General Linguistics

    • By: Laura E. B. Key, Brittany Pheiffer Noble
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 52 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 6
    • Story
      3 out of 5 stars 7

    Ferdinand de Saussure's Course in General Linguistics was first published in 1916, three years after his death. The book aims to explain Saussure's theory that all languages share an underlying structure, and that this underlying structure is the same, regardless of historical or cultural context. Although the book marked a break with the traditional, history-focused study of linguistics of the time, Saussure still uses examples based on more traditional studies.

    • 2 out of 5 stars
    • Unbearable

    • By Two Fathoms on 06-16-18

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Douglas McGregor's The Human Side of Enterprise

    • By: Stoyan Stoyanov, Monique Diderich
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 7

    Traditionally, managers assumed people were lazy and would not work unless strictly controlled. McGregor, however, believed this form of management to be based on faulty assumptions about human nature, and felt that managers should reflect on their assumptions about what motivates people. He proposed they draw on research in psychology and the other social sciences to create working conditions that allow all employees to realize their full human potential.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Geert Hofstede's Culture's Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions, and Organizations Across Nations

    • By: Macat.com
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 56 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11

    Anthropologist Geert Hofstede's 1980 work, Culture's Consequences, was the first study to look at cultural differences using data. The Dutchman took advantage of the enormous global span of his employer, the technology company IBM, to gather survey data in 20 languages and across 70 countries, and to produce a unique study of national values.

    • 2 out of 5 stars
    • Does not contain a summary of the hypotheses

    • By Pascal125 on 06-12-16

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Friedrich Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality

    • By: Don Berry
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 2

    On the Genealogy of Morality was written in 1887 when Friedrich Nietzsche was at the height of his powers as a philosopher and master of German prose writing. Here, he criticizes the idea that there is just one conception of moral goodness, dissecting the contemporary practice of morality and looking at it from a historical viewpoint. Rather than following a metaphysical or religious approach, Nietzsche adopts a naturalistic framework, which is grounded in history and natural science, to understand our concepts of good and evil in the Christianized Western world.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Jane Jacobs's The Death and Life of Great American Cities

    • By: Ryan Moore
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 3

    The era after World War II saw America's urban planners treat the lives of city-dwellers with disdain. It spawned a philosophy of urban renewal that valued the efficient movement of cars more than it valued the lives of people, and that wiped out entire neighborhoods dismissed by bureaucrats as slums. Published in 1961, Jane Jacobs's The Death and Life of Great American Cities examines the shortsightedness and failure of this philosophy. The book turns away from strict statistical study and abstract planning theory in favor of observations.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason

    • By: Michael O'Sullivan
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 6
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 5

    More than two centuries after its initial publication in 1781, Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason remains perhaps the most influential text in modern philosophy. Kant himself claimed his work as a revolutionary document and insisted that it changed the discipline of philosophy as thoroughly as Copernicus had changed astronomy 300 years earlier, when he said the Earth revolved around the sun and not the other way round.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of René Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy

    • By: Andreas Vrahimis
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 50 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
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    Among the general public, Descartes is probably most famous for his pronouncement "I think, therefore I am." That statement first appeared in an earlier work, but he expands on it in Meditations as he considers the idea of the mind as a separate entity to the body - the "dualist" approach. Descartes also set out to dispel skepticism - the idea that one cannot truly know anything. Using his "methodological skepticism," he showed that by doubting everything, we can know some things beyond doubt.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Hannah Arendt's 'The Human Condition'

    • By: Sahar Aurore Saeidnia, Anthony Lang
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 39 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 10
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 9

    In her 1958 work, political theorist Hannah Arendt asks two fundamental questions: "Under what conditions do politics emerge?" and "Under what conditions can politics be eliminated?" In searching for answers she turns some long-established thinking on its head. Ancient political philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle believed that a life spent thinking was more important than an active life of labor, work, and action. But Arendt argues that political action is every bit as important as political thinking.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Niccolò Machiavelli's The Prince

    • By: Riley Quinn, Ben Worthy
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
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    Though written around 1513, more than 500 years ago, Italian diplomat Niccolò Machiavelli's The Prince is still very influential. Listeners turn to it for its direct advice on the question of how to attain - and retain - power. Machiavelli's answer, in brief: use any means necessary to make sure the state survives. Given the changeable nature of politics, the strong ruler that Machiavelli describes may need to lie or cheat, deceive and, if necessary, resort to acts of violence - all the while maintaining an "image" of goodness.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of G. W. F. Hegel Phenomenology of Spirit

    • By: Ian Jackson
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    In his 1807 work Phenomenology of Spirit, G. W. F. Hegel introduced the world to his philosophical system. His most influential work - and the culmination of the German Idealist movement begun in the late 18th century as a response to the works of Immanuel Kant - the book remains one of the undisputed classics of Western thought.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of John Rawls's A Theory of Justice

    • By: Filippo Diongi, Jeremy Kleidosty
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 44 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 24
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 20
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 19

    Issues of human rights and freedoms always inflame passions, and John Rawls's A Theory of Justice will do the same. Published in 1971, it links the idea of social justice to a basic sense of fairness that recognizes human rights and freedoms. Controversially, though, it also accepts differences in the distribution of goods and services - as long as they benefit the worst off in society.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Good Overview and Context

    • By Tristan Copeland on 04-11-18

    Regular price: $6.95

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