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Publisher's Summary

This is a book written primarily for gay Christians and those who love them.

Part memoir, part pastoral-theological reflection, this book wrestles with three main areas of struggle that many gay Christians face:

(1) What is God's will for sexuality?

(2) If the historic Christian tradition is right and same-sex behavior is ruled out, how should gay Christians deal with their resulting loneliness?

(3) How can gay Christians come to an experience of grace that rescues them from crippling feelings of shame and guilt? Author Wesley Hill is not advocating that it is possible for every gay Christian to become straight, nor is he saying that God affirms homosexuality. Instead, Hill comes alongside gay Christians and says, "You are not alone. Here is my experience; it's like yours. And God is with us. We can share in God's grace."

While some authors profess a deep faith in Christ and claim a powerful experience of the Holy Spirit precisely in and through their homosexual practice, Hill's own story, by contrast, is a story of feeling spiritually hindered, rather than helped, by his homosexuality.

His story testifies that homosexuality was not God's original creative intention for humanity—that it is, on the contrary, a tragic sign of human nature and relationships being fractured by sin—and therefore that homosexual practice goes against God's express will for all human beings, especially those who trust in Christ.

©2010 Wesley Hill (P)2010 Zondervan

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Amazing book

This book was so eye opening and encouraging in so many ways. As a pastor wanting to understand the struggle many people go though this was a great book. It's not just a book to understand homosexuality but it is a great book to understand and see the struggle of any temptation.

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A new perspective

Christianity and homosexuality usually has strong oppositions when discussed in one message. Washed and waiting provides a breath of fresh air about how the two can work together in forming a better core for those that are struggling.

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Left wanting

I initially got this book because it had great reviews. There were parts of the authors story that I really liked. The sharing of his personal journey, his struggles and his honesty. The other parts I didn't like was his ability to take scripture and come to the conclusion that he has to live a celebrate life as a gay Christian. Seems to me he is living in his head. I feel sad for him because he may find love in another gay Christian that would fulfill him on some levels. Let's be real. Sex fulfills on a certain level. Why can't this author experience that in his lifetime in a healthy matter?

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Really REALLY helpful.

I really appreciated this book. It's well-written, and extremely well read, and the message is extremely helpful. I was surprised at how much I could take from the book as a heterosexual. Three thumbs up.

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New Insight

loved it gives me new insight on what I'm dealing with and how God views us ad his children.

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A walk with a sinner in redemption

What did you love best about Washed and Waiting?

One of the things that I love best about Washed and Waiting is that this book exists. Hill explains the same challenge of trying to find books that describe an honest struggle of Christians dealing with homosexual bent while striving to be faithful to Christ's call in His Word. Hill is not deceived by the popular approach of our damaged culture that purports that one can be a faithful Christian and a practicing homosexual, nor is he deceived into thinking that his weakness has caused him to be damaged goods before a redeeming Christ. He clings tightly to Christ with an open heart interwoven with God's Word. A insightful, convicting and refreshing approach.

What did you like best about this story?

How it teaches all of us to approach our sin and Christ's work in our lives. Sin is dark and death. Christ's love is redemptive and resurrection. Therefore the unglorified Christian's walk is full of struggle and life.

What insight do you think you’ll apply from Washed and Waiting?

To have a greater hope for myself as a heterosexual Christian dealing with sin. And I will encourage other Christians, struggling with any sin, to consider the same truths that Hill points out about sin and our need for love. This story is for the Church.

Any additional comments?

As much as I appreciate Hill's perspective and story, inevitably I think Hill has a limited perspective of covenant life. Though subtle and indirect, his presentation of redemption throughout his life apart from covenant family seems to negate the richness that comes from the redemptive experience of a Christian marriage and family. I believe there is much more occurring with covenant family that Hill does not seem to see or has not experienced. Again, I can't imagine how he could see this since it is my assumption that he has never experienced it as a son, and has not been granted the opportunity to experience it as a husband and father. I feel certain that Hill longs for this knowledge, and I believe we all will see it most clearly in Glory.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Knowing Personal Memoir

Don't read this book for a compelling exegesis of the Biblical text; Hill takes it for granted that homosexual sex is always sinful.

Do, however, read this book for a compelling and relatable memoir I'm which the author outlines his personal struggles with loneliness as a gay christian who has chosen to remain celibate.

I recommend reading this book alongside Justin Lee's book, "Torn: Rescuing the Gospel from the Gays VS Christians Debate", another memoir that discusses the place for Gay men and women in today's church.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Good content, terrible language & writing

Would you try another book from Wesley Hill and/or Adam Black?

No, I definitely wouldn't read anything from Wesley Hill. His writing style is too academic and dry. He is definitely not born a storyteller. I forced myself to listen this for 2 hours. Although, I love the content. I just died from boredom and could not continue. He needs to realize not everyone has a PhD.

What could Wesley Hill have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Yes. I wish he could simplify his language and shorten his stories and anecdotes. Is his editor blind or something?

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Adam Black?

Performance was kinda dull. The content is already very heavy and dry perhaps a vibrant kinda crazy performer would save it.

What character would you cut from Washed and Waiting?

ALL CHARACTERS INSTEAD OF HILL HIMSELF. Gosh, he needs to stop talking about other people and tell his own story.

Any additional comments?

If you have the attention of an academic scholar, buy this book. Otherwise, STAY AWAY.

0 of 6 people found this review helpful