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Publisher's Summary

In The Myth of Monogamy, husband and wife David P. Barash (an evolutionary biologist) and Judith Eve Lipton (a psychiatrist), stunned the public by showing how rare monogamy is in nature. Now, in Strange Bedfellows, they look at the other side of the coin: how biology actually promotes monogamy in some species and how these lessons apply to human beings.

An accessible work of science that is relevant to our intimate daily life, Strange Bedfellows will reassure some people, surprise others, and engage everyone.

©2009 David P. Barash and Judith Eve Lipton (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"With wit and intelligence, Barash and Lipton provide a rational, scientific look at the seemingly irrational business of falling and staying in love." ( Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Jeff
  • Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • 12-09-09

Great coverage of a sexy topic

This delightful and to-the-point book goes over the necessary material to understand the battle between monogamy and polygamy. It explains how each of the two strategies are evolutionarily advantageous, but also goes over their down-sides. Lots of examples are taken from zoology (gorillas, bonobo monkeys, prairie voles, etc.). Putting humans under the same zoological microscope, a myriad of evidence suggests that we fit the class of "mostly monogamous".

The end of the book is a little patronizing, as if trying to soften the news for those who have trouble accepting our biological reality.

All-in-all, a great little book. Well worth a read (or listen).

17 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    out of 5 stars

Great scientific information.

Very well researched. Very informative and interesting.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

I expected an essay and got a pep talk

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

I thought the performer made a decent job to make the writing alive. However, I expected this book to be more of an essay knowing the authors are professors in biology and psychology. It ended up being a very disappointing book, not enough research, not enough critical thinking. It doesnt feel like professionals wrote this.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Caryl
  • SPRING VALLEY, MN, United States
  • 05-07-10

Well told theory

Not certain this is not a biased account, but puts up a good case for monogamy.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful