Regular price: $24.50

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

If the conscious mind—the part you consider to be you—is just the tip of the iceberg, what is the rest doing?

In this sparkling and provocative new book, the renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman navigates the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate surprising mysteries: Why can your foot move halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Why do you hear your name being mentioned in a conversation that you didn’t think you were listening to? What do Ulysses and the credit crunch have in common? Why did Thomas Edison electrocute an elephant in 1916? Why are people whose names begin with J more likely to marry other people whose names begin with J? Why is it so difficult to keep a secret? And how is it possible to get angry at yourself—who, exactly, is mad at whom?

Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence, and visual illusions, Incognito is a thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2011 David Eagleman (P)2011 Random House

Critic Reviews

"Eagleman has a talent for testing the untestable, for taking seemingly sophomoric notions and using them to nail down the slippery stuff of consciousness.” (The New Yorker)
“Your mind is an elaborate trick, and mastermind David Eagleman explains how the trick works with great lucidity and amazement. Your mind will thank you.” (Wired magazine)
“A fun read by a smart person for smart people.… it will attract a new generation to ponder their inner workings.” (New Scientist)

More from the same

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    811
  • 4 Stars
    412
  • 3 Stars
    178
  • 2 Stars
    43
  • 1 Stars
    27

Performance

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    612
  • 4 Stars
    329
  • 3 Stars
    143
  • 2 Stars
    44
  • 1 Stars
    26

Story

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    661
  • 4 Stars
    286
  • 3 Stars
    143
  • 2 Stars
    29
  • 1 Stars
    16
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Steve
  • Ventura, CA, United States
  • 06-28-17

Horrible

Would you try another book from David Eagleman and/or David Eagleman?

No

What was most disappointing about David Eagleman’s story?

Him reading it.

Would you be willing to try another one of David Eagleman’s performances?

No

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Anger

Any additional comments?

An author who reads his own book has no credibility as a reader and also looses any credibility as an author. I might have enjoyed the book a little if read by a professional reader.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

The author grows on you

If you liked Blink this book delves deeper into cognitive science and ideas for how that science should inform changes in society. highly recommend.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Life Changing!!!

If you could sum up Incognito in three words, what would they be?

EPIC. LOGICAL. ALL-ENCOMPASSING.

What other book might you compare Incognito to and why?

The way the biopsychosocial model is applied when considering the brain ensures every major topic is encompassed. It is easy to read, with simple definitions and explanations for more complex areas. Add the enthusiasm of Dr. Eagleman, from the audiobook, with its simplicity; The result of which is a Fantastically Simple and Thorough Examination of The Brain, the Mind, US, and the Future.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Thanks!

Great message. Helps that the author/researcher/and story teller are the same person. Passion comes through.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

amazing

this really makes the case for the importance of understanding our thoughts. we are really in control of our minds and can choose to pay attention to whatever we want. thanks!

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Great for the curious

This book is fantastic! The author's voice is dynamic and interesting. Prior knowledge on neuroscience is not required to enjoy this book. Great for all that are curious about the subject.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Mind expanding information

The first thing I like about this book is that the author narrates it. I find it gives a book something extra. I love books about the brain/mind connection. I have always felt there was a symbiotic relationship there, not a one or the other. I like how he points out how our brain doesn't control everything nor does our mind but that they both lay a art in who we are and what we do. His science is sound and he admits to not knowing it all unlike some other books I have read. I have a lot to absorb and will listen again after I have had time to process some of it.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Very Interesting

Less scientific than most books on the same subject. Makes some great points. In particular, raises the point that pursuit of understanding the brain and mind through materialism and reductionism may be limited. I recommend this book.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Too short.

The author/narrator makes a strong case for admitting our "self" is a product, more than anything, of complex neurological structure reacting with a fluid environment outside of and prior to our awareness. On the question of free will he basically says "no but It's ok," and explains both. A chapter is devoted to how the legal system could be reformed to reflect current understanding of brain disorders, which of course come in all gradations. Basically you try to prevent future crime, whether it means punishment, rehabilitation, or incarceration. Don't simply punish bad behavior. That's crude and -- given what we now know-- stupid.

Here's a shocking bit: There is a set of genes which, of you have them, make you 10 times more likely to commit murder, 8 times more likely to commit aggregated assault, 13 times for armed robbery, and *44 times* more likely to commit sexuality's assault. 98% of people on death row have this combination of genes. *And fully half the population carries them.*


.. there is a simple test to see if you have it ... look down. It's the Y Chromosome.

Lots of important fun stuff like this is discussed, leaving me with a bit of a new perspective. And nice to have it read by the author himself.

Ok I found the last chapter a bit ... speculative? ... repetitive? ... conversational? ... unnecessary? But it's a top shelf book in my library, I highly recommend it.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Humbling

This is for anyone whose brain network is geared toward curiosity. If it's not maybe you should start that network now. Loved!