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Publisher's Summary

You are a mind reader, born with an extraordinary ability to understand what others think, feel, believe, want, and know. It's a sixth sense you use every day, in every personal and professional relationship you have. At its best, this ability allows you to achieve the most important goal in almost any life: connecting, deeply and intimately and honestly, to other human beings. At its worst, it is a source of misunderstanding and unnecessary conflict, leading to damaged relationships and broken dreams.

How good are you at knowing the minds of others? How well can you guess what others think of you, know who really likes you, or tell when someone is lying? How well do you really understand the minds of those closest to you, from your spouse to your kids to your best friends? Do you really know what your coworkers, employees, competitors, or clients want?

In this illuminating exploration of one of the great mysteries of the human mind, University of Chicago psychologist Nicholas Epley introduces us to what scientists have learned about our ability to understand the most complicated puzzle on the planet - other people - and the surprising mistakes we so routinely make. Why are we sometimes blind to the minds of others, treating them like objects or animals? Why do we sometimes talk to our cars, or the stars, as if there is a mind that can hear us? Why do we so routinely believe that others think, feel, and want what we do when, in fact, they do not? And why do we believe we understand our spouses, family, and friends so much better than we actually do? Mindwise will not turn other people into open books, but it will give you the wisdom to revolutionize how you think about them - and yourself.

©2014 Nicholas Epley (P)2013 Brilliance Audio, all rights reserved.

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What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
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    67
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    23
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    12
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    6

Performance

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    52
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  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Finally gave up - no real point

What would have made Mindwise better?

To have some type of overall vision or concept of what the main goal of book is. The content is REALLY out there. I apply this type of concept every day but saw nothing really revealing and, in some areas, felt the points being made were completely subjective and not based on much experience

What was most disappointing about Nicholas Epley’s story?

The constant rattling off of statistics with no real basis or conclusions that were helpful

What aspect of Nicholas Epley’s performance would you have changed?

It was fairly bland..... it didn't help the statistics become any more interesting... Obviously written from the VERY annalytical perspective with zero consideration for versitility to add any different views for non-analytical readers.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

To be honest, it never grabbed me at all and I just stopped about 1/4 of the way through.. I tried to give it a chance but just didn't see anything relevent to the title.

Any additional comments?

The publisher's summary definitely should be a bit more "real" in terms of the discription, which actually got me to buy it. If there was a way to return this one, I definitely would.

8 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Great insight into our social mind...

Dr. Epley provides great insight into our ability to understand and misunderstand those around us and even ourselves. Through easy to understand real life examples and practical explanations of research that refutes and verifies "common sense" psychology you will come away better informed. The practical implications at the end of the book are profound at both personal and societal levels. Highly recommended. - LJ Burr, MD

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • CC
  • 05-11-14

Fresh, entertaining and very informative

Nick Epley does a wonderful narration of his book. At times I felt I was in his class -- he cites research after research study -- you'd think it would be boring, but not the way he tells it. If you're interested in human behavior, you'll get a lot out of this. Another plus: Professor Epley's passion for this body of knowledge and his warm heart come right through his voice.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

I do recommend!

This really is a very helpful book!
Understanding/Respecting others Points of Views and different Perspectives.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Interesting throughout, but finishes really strong

Would you listen to Mindwise again? Why?

I would listen to Mindwise again because there was a lot to unpack, but I found it overall very understandable and easy to listen to.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Mindwise?

I loved that the book started and ended in the same place with the meeting of his adopted children's father, but at the end you had a better understanding of the limits of the meeting.

Have you listened to any of Nicholas Epley’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have not, but his reading was very engaging.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Insightful

I love that this book is more about breaking down our perceived ability to read others than giving a false sense that you can somehow get everything you need to know from facial and vocal cues.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

useful exploration of important topic

The only reason why not give stars is that some of it was pretty obvious but it's certainly worth a listen. Well told, well organized, discusses some interesting and often surprising research results. Compelling thesis, I'll think back on this one.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Awesom

Loved it. A great book to really bend your mind and get you thinking clear

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Understand your not a mind reader

There were a few thinking points. But for me there was nothing new, inspiring, nor did I feel the urge to change anything.
My take away was that you don't understand people even those close to you as well as you think. You should ask directly rather than assume what others are thinking . So being mind wise is to realize the gaps in communication and the other persons understanding of that information.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

A book challenge your comfortable zone

A great book to refresh your perspective of the world. Hate it at the beginning, but love and will review it at the end. Really like a bitter sweet relationship.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Judy Corstjens
  • 04-21-14

Informative, thoughtful and fun.


This is just the sort of book I like - looking into our minds and perception and teasing out the reasons why our mental processes go wrong and mislead us. Why only four stars? Because sometimes I felt it made errors. For example, early on Mr Epley annihilates the idea that people can tell you why they have made a decision or behave in a certain way (the old problem of post-rationalisation). Then in subsequent chapters he uses survey data (without any apologies) to show, for example, how people think that their reasons for choosing or liking their job are different to those of their employees. So do we trust this self-reporting or not? More egregious, Epley tries to claim that it is our stereotyped images of growing old that lead us to grow old (and not physiological ageing). This is clearly wrong because I have aged in ways I didn’t even imagine or know about (don’t ask). His ‘evidence’ for this theory is that people with good images of growing old age better than those with more negative images of ageing. He doesn’t even bother to discuss the possibility that experience of old people and genetic propensity to age badly might be correlated. I could go on. Oh all right, just one more. He claims to have experimental evidence to show that people would be happier if they systematically talked to fellow travellers on commuter trains. Commuters don’t anticipate that chatting would make them happier, so they don’t try it, and miss out on this great opportunity for joyful social interaction. Maybe these were pre-audio-book commuters :)

I don’t want to discourage you from auditing this book because it is thought provoking and fun - just be aware that in some parts the data seems to be being fit to a theory rather than the other (correct) way round.

Narration: I had to set my ipod reader to ‘slow’ - instead of the normal speed. Nicholas reads his own book, but clearly wanted to whisk through as quickly as possible. Given the thoughtful nature of the content, this listener needed time to ingest the ideas, so slowing the flow was essential for me.

15 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Stevie
  • 04-17-14

Too much personal political bias

What would have made Mindwise better?

I wanted to read a non fiction science book. What I got was tedious and irrelevant American politics. I haven't finished yet I am tempted to just delete it.

Would you ever listen to anything by Nicholas Epley again?

No.

What three words best describe Nicholas Epley’s performance?

He can read aloud.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Mindwise?

All the tedious vomit-inducing sick-making times Epley displays his 'good', 'virtuous' and 'righteous' biases. Its kinda funny that Epley appears to infer that President Obama has empathy superpowers - hahahahaha!

Any additional comments?

Avoid this book if you have high blood pressure and are politically anywhere to the right of Pol Pot. Just avoid it if you cannot stand authors who want to ram their politics down your throat.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • james
  • 01-16-18

A limited exploration of the topic

If this book wasn’t for you, who do you think might enjoy it more?

This would be a good read for someone who wants a broad brush, superficial overview of the topic.

What three words best describe the narrator’s performance?

Neutral, Bland, Appropriate

You didn’t love this book--but did it have any redeeming qualities?

Some parts of this audiobook were insightful and thought provoking. However overall this title seemed to miss the mark. It attributed to much or to little to the scientific studies it cited and lacked a depth of understanding or explanation of the ideas it expounded.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Samiul
  • 10-12-16

Good book but reader was too quick

I wish the performer read it a bit slowly. He was to quick to comprehend the contents at most times

0 of 1 people found this review helpful