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Publisher's Summary

New York Times best-selling author Lilith Saintcrow returns to dark fantasy with a new series where the faery world inhabits diners, dive bars, and trailer parks.

Jeremiah Gallow is just another construction worker, and that's the way he likes it. He's left his past behind, but some things cannot be erased. Like the tattoos on his arms that transform into a weapon or that he was once closer to the Queen of Summer than any half human should be. Now the half sidhe all in Summer once feared is dragged back into the world of enchantment, danger, and fickle fae - by a woman who looks uncannily like his dead wife. Her name is Robin, and her secrets are more than enough to get them both killed. A plague has come, the fullborn fae are dying, and the dark answer to Summer's Court is breaking loose.

Be afraid, for Unwinter is riding....

©2015 Lilith Saintcrow (P)2015 Hachette Audio

Critic Reviews

"A true faery story, creepy and heroic by turns. Love and hope and a touch of Midsummer Night's Dream. I could not put it down." (Patricia Briggs)
"Painfully honest, beautifully strange, and absolutely worth your time. Lilith Saintcrow is at the top of her game. Don't miss this." (Seanan McGuire)
"Unique, twisted, lovely, and raw. Just fabulous." (Faith Hunter)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
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Performance

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 3.7 out of 5.0
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  • Story

Hard to follow

Maybe it's because I don't read this type of book often, but it felt like there was too much going on- too many creatures/powers/names, too little explanation. It made things hard to follow.

The voicer was pleasant to listen to but it was also hard for me to differentiate between when the characters were thinking silently vs when they were speaking.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

starts slow, no traction

I found a few positive reviews abs had heard a recommendation elsewhere, so I was willing to give it a shot, but this one fell flat. I love urban fantasy, but most of the grit and wonder that contrast each other to make the genre so engaging were buried or too understated here. I had so much trouble engaging the story, I had to keep rewinding because I'd realize three chapters had gone by and I had been ignoring the story the whole time.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Matt
  • Camarillo, CA, United States
  • 10-20-16

Someone loves their thesaurus!

What disappointed you about Trailer Park Fae?

The books is filled with soooo much minutia!!! It makes it very taxing to listen to. I am a big fan of this genre and thought it would be in my wheel house, but it was too much. I couldn't even finish the book and I've only had that happen a very few times. Way..way...way too many adjectives use for everything. "She nipped down the alley and pressed her flesh against the weeping bricks". What the hell is that? Half of his book is unneeded descriptive detail and if it where cut out it might a good book at that point. I guess we'll never know.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

I couldn't continue

Okay, the genre, love it. The author's world, love it. But I kept yelling at the inside of my car "Oh come on, Daisy's dead! Move on!" Not to be insensitive to tragedy, but Gallow's mortals wife being dead is a defining characteristic, and it got old. Plus Summer being THAT capricious after centuries... ?

2 of 2 people found this review helpful