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Publisher's Summary

Through the years, our understanding of Jesus has been shaped by different cultural influences, and many Christians have forgotten that Jesus was a Jewish man living in a Jewish land, observing Jewish customs, and investing his life into Jewish men and women.

Trading the popular but inaccurate Western perspective of the Bible for the context in which Jesus actually ministered 2,000 years ago, author Robby Gallaty reveals the fascinating Hebraic culture, customs, and nuances many Christians have never experienced or learned about. He works from the premise that we can't truly appreciate the New Testament unless we understand the Old Testament. By uncovering the teaching of the first- and second-century rabbis and Christian theologians, and highlighting little-known Jewish idioms and traditions, Gallaty takes Christians on a biblical journey to rediscover a forgotten Jesus from a biblical perspective, deepening your relationship with God.

©2017 Robert Gallaty (P)2017 Two Words Publishing, LLC

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Helpful and Balanced

What did you love best about The Forgotten Jesus?

I appreciated the many Hebraic insights offered in this book. It seemed fair and balanced, and I especially appreciated his cautionary conclusion guiding further study and warning of the dangers of sources that might elevate Hebrew cultural studies to the level of Scriptural authority. I found his discussion contrasting the thinking and language of the Greeks vs the Hebrews quite helpful to explain many of the differences I've noticed in my own study of those languages. I very much resonated with his critique of our Greek-esque Western tendency to "educate ourselves beyond obedience." The section on the six major good shepherds (Abel, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, David and Amos) that prefigured the Messianic seventh seemed the weakest to me. Why those names and not a Job or Abraham? The selection of six seemed arbitrary though the prophetic role of Messiah as Shepherd I'm convinced is huge. Overall I enjoyed the book and would recommend it to others.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful