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Editorial Reviews

Listeners smarting from a recent humiliation can take solace in Worst Ideas Ever: A Celebration of Embarrassment, a compendium of the biggest blunders in recent history. Some of the wretched ideas listed here will live forever in infamy for their negative example - say, New Coke or Bernie Madoff. Others are rescued from obscurity by authors Daniel Kline and Jason Tomaszewski, like the idea to put record players in Chevy cars, or Cop Rock, the (thankfully) forgotten musical police procedural by the creator of NYPD Blue. Narrator Patrick Lawlor's droll, winking descriptions of the worst that sports, entertainment, and pop culture have to offer is an antidote to a bad day. Those prone to noisy laughter might want to listen to this one in private.

Publisher's Summary

Mistakes so big they seem like fodder for The Onion - but they really happened!

From memorable disasters such as New Coke, the XFL, and Tiger Woods’ marriage to less-remembered failures such as Yugo, Cop Rock, and Microsoft’s BOB, Worst Ideas Ever revisits history’s biggest blunders. Whether it’s a pop culture failure the likes of Dennis Miller’s disastrous run on Monday Night Football, a political one such as John Edwards’ odd decision to run for president while cheating on his cancer-stricken wife, or a technological misstep such as Apple’s Newton OS, Worst Ideas Ever uncovers the ridiculous stories behind mistakes so huge, you’ll have to constantly remind yourself that they actually happened.

Moving from Mariah Carey’s “performance” in Glitter to the Minnesota Vikings decision to trade away their future for an aging Herschel Walker, Worst Ideas Ever offers the real stories behind some of the dumbest things ever done. Whether it was ego (Michael Jordan leaving basketball for baseball), greed (nobody questioning their impossibly high returns when investing with Bernie Madoff) or simple stupidity (Jay Leno moving to 10 p.m.), Worst Ideas Ever brings it all back in hilarious detail.

©2011 Daniel B. Kline and Jason Tomaszewski (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Story

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  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Schadenfreude without insight.

This is really just a schadenfreude-istic recounting of some spectacular failures. Some of them are more amusing than others, but I was hoping for more of an exploration of how these ideas originated in concept, moved through execution, and where it all fell apart. Where these actually bad ideas, or decent ideas poorly executed? This book is not at all interested in that question. Enjoy your New Coke, I suppose, but don't expect to learn anything.

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  • JC
  • 09-16-15

Lame

If you like to hang out with whining, opinionated old Aunt Marge, this is the book for you! Sadly, it didn't work for me. Daily Deal bust.

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  • Story

Pioneers

It's seems easy to write a book about past mistakes but also some of these I would have fell victim. However I wanted to use this book as a 20/20 but the lessons were not set to understand why but just to make mockery. For this you should have included the Titanic, 9/11 and Nixon etc ... This list would never end.

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Mildly interesting, but wholly unnecessary

Occasionally interesting but LESS than the sum of its parts. Largely a waste of time.

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This book should be added to worst idea ever list

The only thing worse than hearing a guy list terrible failed ideas is to have him conclude the book without anything learned from the list. Is it good to fail sometimes because behind every genius idea was a terrible idea as a predecessor? No. Nothing, no thoughts. Just knocking a bunch of people for trying something new.

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  • Story

Fun and informative until it gets a bit political

Breezy book about bad ideas. The authors inject their politics toward the end. Until then it kept me engaged. Would recommend for light reading.

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Interesting & fun to remember

I remember many of these crazy "worst ideas ever" when they happened and remember no one thinking they were a good idea and thought the companies paying people big money to come up with these in the big cooperate think tanks had wasted a lot a money! So it was a fun trip down memory lane for me. Patrick Lawler did an excellent job as narrator. I prefer him reading non fiction books like this more than as a character narrator.

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Worst book ever

This was just a collection of poorly edited clickbait stories, with little insight.

I wondered if they accidentally sent the narrator an early draft instead of the edited manuscript.

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Reliving famous poor choices.

This is a relatively short but interesting listening experience, narrated adeptly by Patrick Lawlor. I enjoyed the appealing wry humor of the authors. However, I did not appreciate the occasional comparisons offered in terms of negative female stereotypes. Did the authors really need to get sexist to make their points? Those comments should also be counted among the worst ideas ever!

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  • Story

Interesting topic made hard to listen to.

I will admit that the topic is quite interesting. Taking a look at the backstory of some of the worst ideas ever sounds like a great read. Unfortunately, the author writes in an editorial style where he takes extreme views of the "stupidity" of the people involved in the decisions themselves. The book reads more like a blog, newspaper editorial or magazine.
The problem is many of these decisions aren't necessarily stupid in the forefront and only ended up that way in hindsight. They were gambles and in the real chronological timeframe many other decisions that happened alongside of these, worked out and became brilliant decisions of trend setters and pioneers. Indeed, many of the decisions were just plain stupid. However, the always negative positioning of the authors' views along with the limited scope of his information on the backstory make him seem arrogant and as if he would never of made such crazy mistakes.

The topic is interesting, but knowing a little bit about the further backstory of many of these decisions I see where the author's views or a limit the little limited. It made an otherwise interesting topic difficult to listen to. I think if the author had taken more of a documentarian stance simply informing us of what led to these decisions it would've been a much more enjoyable read.