We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .

Refine Search Results

 
Search Results for Author: 

Scientific American

1-20of254results Previous 1 2 3 ... 13 Next
Sort by
  • Can HIV Be Cured?: Scientific American | Mario Stevenson,Scientific American

    Can HIV Be Cured?: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (18 mins)
    • By Mario Stevenson, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (5)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Researchers may be able to eliminate HIV from the body by flushing the virus out of its hiding places. This article was published in the November 2008 edition of Scientific American.

  • Scientific American, February 2013 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, February 2013

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 23 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

  • Dinosaurs: Scientific American Special Edition | Scientific American

    Dinosaurs: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (30)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (11)

    First, hear about fish-shaped reptiles that thrived in the oceans while dinosaurs ruled the land. Then, learn about the evolutionary history of whales, the mammals that conquered the seas. The most famous of all dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus Rex, gets a fresh look as scientists re-examine fossil evidence for clues as to the tyrannosaur¿s actual behavior. Also, learn about some ancient Australian marsupials that were as ferocious as they were bizarre. Then, "Which Came First, the Feather or the Bird?", and more.

  • The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American | Robert Cialdini,Scientific American

    The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (21 mins)
    • By Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Sal Giangrasso
    Overall
    (158)
    Performance
    (88)
    Story
    (85)

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    Hammy says: "Direct and to the point"
  • Brave New World of Wiretapping: Scientific American | Whitfield Diffie,Susan Landau,Scientific American

    Brave New World of Wiretapping: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (25 mins)
    • By Whitfield Diffie, Susan Landau, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    As telephone conversations have moved to the Internet, so have those who want to listen in. But the technology needed to do so would entail a dangerous expansion of the government�s surveillance powers. This article was published in the September 2008 edition of Scientific American.

  • Secret Lives of Stars: Scientific American Special Edition | Scientific American

    Secret Lives of Stars: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (55)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (20)

    We track these cosmic phenomena through their births, lives, and fiery deaths. The first article tells us about the appearance of the very first stars in the universe. Then, we will learn about the early days in the life of a star, as we track it's progression from dust to giant flaming ball of gas. Also, contrary to conventional wisdom, scientists have discovered that stars can, and often do, collide with each other.

    Barry J. Marshall says: "Fantastic Cosmic Stuff Well Explained"
  • September 2017 | Scientific American

    September 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 17 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "Promiscuous Men, Chaste Women and Other Gender Myths": The notion that behavioral differences between the sexes are innate and immutable does not hold up under scrutiny. "Is there a 'Female' Brain?": The debate over whether men and women have meaningfully different brains could have profound implications for health and personal identity. "When Sex and Gender Collide": Studies of transgender kids are revealing fascinating insights about gender in the brain. "Not Just for Men": Researchers must dig deeper into gender differences before they can provide better treatments.

  • Eating to Live: Scientific American Reports | Scientific American

    Eating to Live: Scientific American Reports

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (35)
    Performance
    (10)
    Story
    (9)

    This edition of Scientific American Reports contains seven articles. You'll hear about genetically modified foods, how nutrition has changed from the past and what it will look like in the future, how cutting calories may prolong youthful vigor into old age, and just how detrimental to health obesity is.

    Justin says: "Good nutritional book, Basics, future, present"
  • Sex and the Secret Nerve: Scientific American Mind | Scientific American

    Sex and the Secret Nerve: Scientific American Mind

    • ABRIDGED (1 hr and 45 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (40)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (12)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles on topics that deal with human behavior. You'll hear about the future of online dating, the continuing mystery of acupuncture, what home really means, how to be happy, and why some people are obsessed with...garbage.

    Daníel says: "Not what i thougt"
  • Human Evolution: Scientific American Special Edition | Scientific American

    Human Evolution: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (3 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (79)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (18)

    Reading the cracked brown fragments of fossils and sequences of DNA, scientists have found clues that the story of human origins has more convolutions than previously thought. The account of our shared human heritage now includes more controversial plot twists and mysteries. Was the remarkable seven-million-year-old skull found in July 2002 in Chad really one of our first forebears, or a distant dead-end cousin with precociously evolved features?

    Anderson says: "Excellent, informative, concise"
  • Scientific American, June 2009 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, June 2009

    • ABRIDGED (1 hr and 16 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    "Improbable Planets": Astronomers are finding planets where there were not supposed to be any. "The Price of Silent Mutations": Small changes to DNA are proving to be big factors in human diseases, evolution and biotechnology. "The Taming of the Cat": Genetic and archaeological findings suggest wildcats became house cats much earlier - and in a much different place.

  • July 2017 | Scientific American

    July 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 24 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "Memory's Intricate Web": A technical revolution provides insight into how the brain links memories. "Black Holes from the Beginning of Time": A hidden population of black holes born less than one second after the big bang could solve the mystery of dark matter. "How Cities Could Save Us": Urban areas can improve the planet as well as people's lives if we design them to be much more resourceful. "Operation: Diabetes": Surgery that shortens intestines gets rid of the illness, and new evidence shows the gut – not simply insulin – may be responsible.

  • Scientific American, June 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, June 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 30 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "The Quantum Multiverse": A surprising connection between cosmology and quantum mechanics could unveil the secrets of space and time. "The Messy Truth about Weight Loss": Two decades of research confirm that weight loss is about burning more calories than you consume—but what you eat is more important than how much you exercise.

  • The Science of Intuition: Scientific American Mind | Scientific American

    The Science of Intuition: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 44 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (36)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (10)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

  • Staying Young: Scientific American Special Edition | Scientific American

    Staying Young: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (19)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    Merely accruing additional years beyond the biblical span of three score and 10 would be unwelcome if they just prolonged suffering from illness and infirmity. No, we want to live better, more youthful days while we're living longer. Diet, exercise and a lucky draw from the gene pool can take us only so far, however. That's where science comes in. In this special edition from Scientific American, you'll find firsthand reports from the researchers leading the efforts to understand the mechanisms of aging.

  • Scientific American, February 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, February 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 35 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "The Exercise Paradox": Studies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight. "Pop Goes the Universe": The latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas. "High-Flying Microbes": Aerial drones and chaos theory help researchers explore the many ways that microorganisms spread havoc around the world. "Deep-Space Deal Breaker".

  • Scientific American, February 2014 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, February 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 26 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

  • Scientific American, January 2004 |  Scientific American

    Scientific American, January 2004

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 57 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    This month's cover story, "Loop Quantum Gravity" takes a closer look at the atoms of space and time. Also in this issue of Scientific American for January 2004: radio-frequency identification tags stand poised to automate many aspects of our lives, decoding schizophrenia, a look at how men and woman lived in one of the largest Neolithic settlement, and more.

    Franz says: "Great concept, even better description!"
  • The Psychology of Success: Scientific American Mind | Scientific American

    The Psychology of Success: Scientific American Mind

    • ABRIDGED (1 hr and 41 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (30)
    Performance
    (7)
    Story
    (7)

    "The Social Psychology of Success" ; "The Orgasmic Mind"; "A Face in the Crowd"; "Buried Prejudice"; and "Imagined Ugliness".

    Douglas says: "Some interesting stuff..."
  • Consciousness: Scientific American Mind | Scientific American

    Consciousness: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (87)
    Performance
    (33)
    Story
    (34)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven articles. The cover story deals with synesthesia, when senses blend together in the brain. Also in this issue: thrill seeking, intelligence drugs, power trips, first impressions, the winter blues and lastly better work through relaxation.

    Douglas says: "Good Issue..."
1-20of254results Previous 1 2 3 ... 13 Next