Showing results by author "Scientific American"

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    • Criminal Mind

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 30
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles, on topics such as why some people hear voices, what causes migraine headaches, why only humans cry, the possible uses of medicine for mental fatigue, and increased usage of brain scans.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Best of this series so far...

    • By Douglas on 02-13-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • A Need For New Warheads?

    • Scientific American
    • By: David Biello, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 23 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      2.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Countries are altering their nuclear arsenals, prompting the U.S. to refurbish its own warheads. America's proposal to build the first new nuclear warhead in two decades is rasing a host of questions. Learn more in this article, "A Need For New Warheads?", from the November 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Scientific American, February 2014

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Staying Young

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 2 hrs and 4 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 20
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4

    Merely accruing additional years beyond the biblical span of three score and 10 would be unwelcome if they just prolonged suffering from illness and infirmity. No, we want to live better, more youthful days while we're living longer. Diet, exercise and a lucky draw from the gene pool can take us only so far, however. That's where science comes in. In this special edition from Scientific American, you'll find firsthand reports from the researchers leading the efforts to understand the mechanisms of aging.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • How to Build a Time Machine

    • Scientific American
    • By: Paul Davies, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 14 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 39
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 17
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 17

    It goes without saying that building a time machine wouldn't be easy. But according to author Paul Davies, it might actually be possible.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • The Neuroscience of Dance

    • Scientific American
    • By: Steven Brown, Lawrence M. Parsons, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 15 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    Recent brain-imaging studies reveal some of the complex neural choreography behind our ability to dance. This article was published in the July 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Scientific American, March 2001

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 25 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue of Scientific American, "Sculpting the Earth from Inside Out." Powerful motions deep inside the planet do not merely shove fragments of the rocky shell horizontally around the globe - they also lift and lower entire continents. How does the brain interpret what the tongue tastes? Two authors explore the bitter, sweet, salty, and sour world in "Making Sense of Taste." Plus, "A Sharper View of the Stars," "The Needy Porcupine," and James Burke's "Connections."

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2013

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Eating to Live

    • Scientific American Reports
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 2 hrs and 19 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 36
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 10

    This edition of Scientific American Reports contains seven articles. You'll hear about genetically modified foods, how nutrition has changed from the past and what it will look like in the future, how cutting calories may prolong youthful vigor into old age, and just how detrimental to health obesity is.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Good nutritional book, Basics, future, present

    • By Justin on 09-25-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Dinosaurs

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 2 hrs and 55 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 32
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 14
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 13

    First, hear about fish-shaped reptiles that thrived in the oceans while dinosaurs ruled the land. Then, learn about the evolutionary history of whales, the mammals that conquered the seas. The most famous of all dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus Rex, gets a fresh look as scientists re-examine fossil evidence for clues as to the tyrannosaur¿s actual behavior. Also, learn about some ancient Australian marsupials that were as ferocious as they were bizarre. Then, "Which Came First, the Feather or the Bird?", and more.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Scientific American, February 2001

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Are We Almost Tapped Out?" Scientific American offers a series of stories about the state of the world's water supplies. A freshwater expert explains why clean water is a rare commodity for billions. Even when there is water for drinking, what about having enough for irrigation? Is the era of Edison's light coming to an end? Get the answers to these questions and more...

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Why Migraines Strike

    • Scientific American
    • By: David W. Dodick, J. Jay Gargus, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 22 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 2

    Biologists have solved the mystery of one of our most misunderstood, poorly recognized, and inadequately treated medical disorders. This article was published in the August 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Memory, Fear & Anger

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 50 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 92
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 20
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 22

    The cover story reveals how painful, long-term memories might actually be erased with the use of drugs at just the right moment. Then, an article that asks a provocative question - can we cure fear? Following that, it's an examination of anger -- should you control your emotions or let them rip? Next, it's a look at the persistence of myths -- and their connection to the brain's biological needs. Our fifth article seeks to explode one myth -- about the value of self-esteem.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Scientific American, January 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 7 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "Lab-Built Brains": Scientists copy nature's most complex organ in the hope of solving the mysteries of brain disorders, from autism to Alzheimer's. "Tangled Up in Spacetime": The collaborative project "It from Qubit" is investigating whether space and time sprang from the quantum entanglement of tiny bits of information. "Heart Therapy": Harnessing the organ's own healing properties may help prevent heart attacks and lessen the painful effects of severely narrowed coronary arteries.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 163
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 92
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 89

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Direct and to the point

    • By Hammy on 09-09-08

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Human Evolution

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 3 hrs and 9 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 80
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 19
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 19

    Reading the cracked brown fragments of fossils and sequences of DNA, scientists have found clues that the story of human origins has more convolutions than previously thought. The account of our shared human heritage now includes more controversial plot twists and mysteries. Was the remarkable seven-million-year-old skull found in July 2002 in Chad really one of our first forebears, or a distant dead-end cousin with precociously evolved features?

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Excellent, informative, concise

    • By Anderson on 11-20-10

    Regular price: $5.95

    • July 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 24 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "Memory's Intricate Web": A technical revolution provides insight into how the brain links memories. "Black Holes from the Beginning of Time": A hidden population of black holes born less than one second after the big bang could solve the mystery of dark matter. "How Cities Could Save Us": Urban areas can improve the planet as well as people's lives if we design them to be much more resourceful. "Operation: Diabetes": Surgery that shortens intestines gets rid of the illness, and new evidence shows the gut – not simply insulin – may be responsible.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Restoring America's Big Wild Animals

    • Scientific American
    • By: C. Josh Donlan, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 18 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 1

    A few years ago, conservation biologists met to ponder a bold plan: the reintroduction of large, extinct animals to North America. Learn where that landmark project is now with this article, "Restoring America's Big Wild Animals", from the June 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • so good

    • By Michelle Cooper on 03-29-16

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Scientific American, February 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "The Exercise Paradox": Studies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight. "Pop Goes the Universe": The latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas. "High-Flying Microbes": Aerial drones and chaos theory help researchers explore the many ways that microorganisms spread havoc around the world. "Deep-Space Deal Breaker".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • The Science of Intuition

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 44 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 37
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 11

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

    Regular price: $3.95

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