Showing results by author "Scientific American"

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    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 161
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 91
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 88

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Direct and to the point

    • By Hammy on 09-09-08

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Scientific American, February 2014

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Creativity

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American Mind
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 34 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 123
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 24
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 24

    The cover story in this issue explains how creativity and brilliance arises in all of us. Then, we'll take a look at the latest theories behind the experience commonly known as 'deja-vu'. Also, we'll learn about a mental breakdown that causes apathy so extreme it could become deadly, as well as Capgras syndrome, a perception disorder that causes people to think their loved ones have been replaced by extraterrestrial body doubles.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Loved it

    • By Prospyros on 08-16-05

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Scientific American, February 2013

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Do Gays Have a Choice?

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Robert Epstein, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 16 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 52
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 27
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 26

    In this essay from the pages of Scientific American Mind magazine, "Do Gays Have A Choice?", psychologist Robert Epstein writes that science has a clear and surprising answer. This article originally appeared in the February/March 2006 issue.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Excellent Listen

    • By Me & My Girls on 01-13-15

    Regular price: $1.95

    • August 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "Life Springs": Deep oceans were thought to hold life's origins. New evidence points instead to an active volcanic landscape. "Building a Better Harvest": Scientists are learning to manipulate the complex conversation that plants have with microbes, pests, nutrients, and other elements in hopes of averting a future famine. "Talking to Ourselves": Studies of the conversations people have with themselves open a window on the hidden working of the mind. "Requiem for the Vaquita": What the demise of a small Mexican porpoise tells us about extinction in the 21st century.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Human Evolution

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 3 hrs and 9 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 80
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 19
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 19

    Reading the cracked brown fragments of fossils and sequences of DNA, scientists have found clues that the story of human origins has more convolutions than previously thought. The account of our shared human heritage now includes more controversial plot twists and mysteries. Was the remarkable seven-million-year-old skull found in July 2002 in Chad really one of our first forebears, or a distant dead-end cousin with precociously evolved features?

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Excellent, informative, concise

    • By Anderson on 11-20-10

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Consciousness

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 2 hrs and 4 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 88
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 33
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 34

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven articles. The cover story deals with synesthesia, when senses blend together in the brain. Also in this issue: thrill seeking, intelligence drugs, power trips, first impressions, the winter blues and lastly better work through relaxation.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Good Issue...

    • By Douglas on 03-13-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • How to Build a Time Machine

    • Scientific American
    • By: Paul Davies, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 14 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 39
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 17
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 17

    It goes without saying that building a time machine wouldn't be easy. But according to author Paul Davies, it might actually be possible.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • The Teen Brain

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 42
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 10
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 10

    In the cover story, "The Teen Brain: Hard at Work. No... Really!", science reveals the ongoing changes underlying adolescent behavior. Next, you'll hear how researchers are achieving amazing results treating severely depressed patients by implanting an electrode in the brain. Then, you'll get some insights into why some people turn violent, and why some faint at the sight of blood.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Good

    • By Horace on 01-19-17

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Scientific American, February 2001

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Are We Almost Tapped Out?" Scientific American offers a series of stories about the state of the world's water supplies. A freshwater expert explains why clean water is a rare commodity for billions. Even when there is water for drinking, what about having enough for irrigation? Is the era of Edison's light coming to an end? Get the answers to these questions and more...

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Burnout

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 15 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 64
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 14
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 15

    This issue of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles. In the cover story, "Burned Out," you'll find out that if you're feeling overwhelmed by the demands of your job, you're definitely not alone. You'll also hear about new research that finds older workers are not necessarily slower than younger workers, and they often make fewer errors; you'll go inside the extraordinary memory of Kim Peek, the savant who was the inspiration for Rain Man; and more.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Scientific American, June 2009

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 16 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Improbable Planets": Astronomers are finding planets where there were not supposed to be any. "The Price of Silent Mutations": Small changes to DNA are proving to be big factors in human diseases, evolution and biotechnology. "The Taming of the Cat": Genetic and archaeological findings suggest wildcats became house cats much earlier - and in a much different place.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, April 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 27 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "A Rare Success against Alzheimer's": A gold-standard clinical trial provides evidence that diet, exercise and an active social life can help prevent cognitive decline. "How to Swallow a Sun": New techniques reveal how supermassive black holes shred entire stars. "Transformers": By reprogramming DNA inside harmful microbes, biologists are turning them into patient-saving drugs. "Evolution at the Limits": Studies of fishes that inhabit toxic sulfide springs reveal mechanisms of natural selection.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • The Science of Intuition

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 44 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 37
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 11

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Sex and the Secret Nerve

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 41
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 12
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 13

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles on topics that deal with human behavior. You'll hear about the future of online dating, the continuing mystery of acupuncture, what home really means, how to be happy, and why some people are obsessed with...garbage.

    • 2 out of 5 stars
    • Not what i thougt

    • By Daníel on 05-20-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • The Body Speaks

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 34
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 13
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 14

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six articles. You will hear about exciting new advances in the early detection of autism, how people can be trained to recover their lost sense of smell, the special language skills that set humans apart from their fellow animals, and how the body speaks.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • So who is really in charge of the "Real World" ??

    • By T. Roberson on 12-29-16

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Scientific American, October 2004

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This month's issue of Scientific American features five articles. The cover story investigates the possibility of controlling hurricanes. Next, we rustle through genetic junk and the secrets of complexity. In the third article, we take to the polls for an analysis of electronic voting. Then, in physiology, why the lens of your eye may be the key to many diseases. Finally, we check out the possibilities of an all-encompassing Internet.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, March 2006

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Scientific American
    • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 21
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This month, we'll learn about genes that may extend human life and eliminate the diseases of old age, as well as about smart wireless devices, the dangers of rising acid levels in the Earth's oceans, and the limits of mathematical reason.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "The Exercise Paradox": Studies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight. "Pop Goes the Universe": The latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas. "High-Flying Microbes": Aerial drones and chaos theory help researchers explore the many ways that microorganisms spread havoc around the world. "Deep-Space Deal Breaker".

    Regular price: $6.95

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