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Scientific American

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  • September 2017 | Scientific American

    September 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 17 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
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    (1)
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    (1)

    In this issue: "Promiscuous Men, Chaste Women and Other Gender Myths": The notion that behavioral differences between the sexes are innate and immutable does not hold up under scrutiny. "Is there a 'Female' Brain?": The debate over whether men and women have meaningfully different brains could have profound implications for health and personal identity. "When Sex and Gender Collide": Studies of transgender kids are revealing fascinating insights about gender in the brain. "Not Just for Men": Researchers must dig deeper into gender differences before they can provide better treatments.

  • Consciousness: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Consciousness: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (85)
    Performance
    (32)
    Story
    (33)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven articles. The cover story deals with synesthesia, when senses blend together in the brain. Also in this issue: thrill seeking, intelligence drugs, power trips, first impressions, the winter blues and lastly better work through relaxation.

    Douglas says: "Good Issue..."
  • Creativity: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American Mind

    Creativity: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 34 mins)
    • By Scientific American Mind
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (122)
    Performance
    (23)
    Story
    (23)

    The cover story in this issue explains how creativity and brilliance arises in all of us. Then, we'll take a look at the latest theories behind the experience commonly known as 'deja-vu'. Also, we'll learn about a mental breakdown that causes apathy so extreme it could become deadly, as well as Capgras syndrome, a perception disorder that causes people to think their loved ones have been replaced by extraterrestrial body doubles.

    Prospyros says: "Loved it"
  • Scientific American, January 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, January 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 7 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "Lab-Built Brains": Scientists copy nature's most complex organ in the hope of solving the mysteries of brain disorders, from autism to Alzheimer's. "Tangled Up in Spacetime": The collaborative project "It from Qubit" is investigating whether space and time sprang from the quantum entanglement of tiny bits of information. "Heart Therapy": Harnessing the organ's own healing properties may help prevent heart attacks and lessen the painful effects of severely narrowed coronary arteries.

  • Scientific American, June 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, June 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 30 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "The Quantum Multiverse": A surprising connection between cosmology and quantum mechanics could unveil the secrets of space and time. "The Messy Truth about Weight Loss": Two decades of research confirm that weight loss is about burning more calories than you consume—but what you eat is more important than how much you exercise.

  • Dinosaurs: Scientific American Special Edition |  Scientific American

    Dinosaurs: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (30)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (11)

    First, hear about fish-shaped reptiles that thrived in the oceans while dinosaurs ruled the land. Then, learn about the evolutionary history of whales, the mammals that conquered the seas. The most famous of all dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus Rex, gets a fresh look as scientists re-examine fossil evidence for clues as to the tyrannosaur¿s actual behavior. Also, learn about some ancient Australian marsupials that were as ferocious as they were bizarre. Then, "Which Came First, the Feather or the Bird?", and more.

  • Scientific American, February 2013 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, February 2013

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 23 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
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    (0)

    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

  • Scientific American, August 2005 |  Scientific American

    Scientific American, August 2005

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 39 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    In the cover story, we'll take a look at the curious discrepancies between theory and observations of the "music" of the cosmic microwave background. Then, new fossil evidence reveals that animal life is even older than we thought. Also, we'll hear about new approaches to preventing and treating aneurysms, the challenge of symbolic thinking, and disease-treating antibody-replacements derived from camels.

  • August 2017 | Scientific American

    August 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 47 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "Life Springs": Deep oceans were thought to hold life's origins. New evidence points instead to an active volcanic landscape. "Building a Better Harvest": Scientists are learning to manipulate the complex conversation that plants have with microbes, pests, nutrients, and other elements in hopes of averting a future famine. "Talking to Ourselves": Studies of the conversations people have with themselves open a window on the hidden working of the mind. "Requiem for the Vaquita": What the demise of a small Mexican porpoise tells us about extinction in the 21st century.

  • The Teen Brain: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    The Teen Brain: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 30 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (40)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    In the cover story, "The Teen Brain: Hard at Work. No... Really!", science reveals the ongoing changes underlying adolescent behavior. Next, you'll hear how researchers are achieving amazing results treating severely depressed patients by implanting an electrode in the brain. Then, you'll get some insights into why some people turn violent, and why some faint at the sight of blood.

    Horace says: "Good"
  • The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American | Robert Cialdini,Scientific American

    The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (21 mins)
    • By Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Sal Giangrasso
    Overall
    (154)
    Performance
    (84)
    Story
    (81)

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    Hammy says: "Direct and to the point"
  • Burnout: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Burnout: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 15 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (62)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (14)

    This issue of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles. In the cover story, "Burned Out," you'll find out that if you're feeling overwhelmed by the demands of your job, you're definitely not alone. You'll also hear about new research that finds older workers are not necessarily slower than younger workers, and they often make fewer errors; you'll go inside the extraordinary memory of Kim Peek, the savant who was the inspiration for Rain Man; and more.

  • Memory, Fear & Anger: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Memory, Fear & Anger: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 51 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (90)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (20)

    The cover story reveals how painful, long-term memories might actually be erased with the use of drugs at just the right moment. Then, an article that asks a provocative question - can we cure fear? Following that, it's an examination of anger -- should you control your emotions or let them rip? Next, it's a look at the persistence of myths -- and their connection to the brain's biological needs. Our fifth article seeks to explode one myth -- about the value of self-esteem.

  • Time: Scientific American Special Edition |  Scientific American

    Time: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 47 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (62)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    This special edition of Scientific American contains six articles full of remarkable insights into the inner workings of your body and your mind. How does your biological clock keep you running? How does your brain make chronological sense of your experiences and memories? You'll also hear how scientists are striving to understand time, from its very origins to the possibility of a time machine. And, you'll get a fascinating history of the timepiece.

    Barry J. Marshall says: "Interesting and Informative"
  • Secret Lives of Stars: Scientific American Special Edition |  Scientific American

    Secret Lives of Stars: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (55)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (20)

    We track these cosmic phenomena through their births, lives, and fiery deaths. The first article tells us about the appearance of the very first stars in the universe. Then, we will learn about the early days in the life of a star, as we track it's progression from dust to giant flaming ball of gas. Also, contrary to conventional wisdom, scientists have discovered that stars can, and often do, collide with each other.

    Barry J. Marshall says: "Fantastic Cosmic Stuff Well Explained"
  • Human Evolution: Scientific American Special Edition |  Scientific American

    Human Evolution: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (3 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (77)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (15)

    Reading the cracked brown fragments of fossils and sequences of DNA, scientists have found clues that the story of human origins has more convolutions than previously thought. The account of our shared human heritage now includes more controversial plot twists and mysteries. Was the remarkable seven-million-year-old skull found in July 2002 in Chad really one of our first forebears, or a distant dead-end cousin with precociously evolved features?

    Anderson says: "Excellent, informative, concise"
  • Scientific American, July 2016 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, July 2016

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 35 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "The Brain Boosting Power of Video Games": Shooting zombies and repelling aliens can lead to lasting improvement in mental skills. "Our Place in the Cosmos": The Milky Way turns out to be part of a massive supercluster of galaxies that forms one of the largest known structures in the universe. This discovery is only the beginning of a new effort to maps the cosmos. "Ebola's Second Coming": Brain deficits and more torment many virus survivors in Liberia. The top suspects are hidden viral remnants and immune system overreactions.

  • Scientific American, January 2016 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, January 2016

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 13 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "Where Am I? Where Am I Going?": Scientists are discovering how the brain navigates. "Rings of a Super Saturn": Astronomers have discovered a gargantuan planetary ring system and possibly a moon around another star. "Death in the Water": Arsenic poisoning from wells is getting worse in India and other parts of Asia, harming millions while scientists scramble to find safer sources.

  • July 2017 | Scientific American

    July 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 24 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "Memory's Intricate Web": A technical revolution provides insight into how the brain links memories. "Black Holes from the Beginning of Time": A hidden population of black holes born less than one second after the big bang could solve the mystery of dark matter. "How Cities Could Save Us": Urban areas can improve the planet as well as people's lives if we design them to be much more resourceful. "Operation: Diabetes": Surgery that shortens intestines gets rid of the illness, and new evidence shows the gut – not simply insulin – may be responsible.

  • Scientific American, February 2014 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, February 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 26 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

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