Showing results by author "Scientific American"

Categories

All Categories

258 results
Sort by
    • Scientific American, February 2013

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2001

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Are We Almost Tapped Out?" Scientific American offers a series of stories about the state of the world's water supplies. A freshwater expert explains why clean water is a rare commodity for billions. Even when there is water for drinking, what about having enough for irrigation? Is the era of Edison's light coming to an end? Get the answers to these questions and more...

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2014

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Staying Young

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 2 hrs and 4 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 20
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4

    Merely accruing additional years beyond the biblical span of three score and 10 would be unwelcome if they just prolonged suffering from illness and infirmity. No, we want to live better, more youthful days while we're living longer. Diet, exercise and a lucky draw from the gene pool can take us only so far, however. That's where science comes in. In this special edition from Scientific American, you'll find firsthand reports from the researchers leading the efforts to understand the mechanisms of aging.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Criminal Mind

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 25 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 30
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 12

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles, on topics such as why some people hear voices, what causes migraine headaches, why only humans cry, the possible uses of medicine for mental fatigue, and increased usage of brain scans.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Best of this series so far...

    • By Douglas on 02-13-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Scientific American, April 2015

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    "Burning Rings of Fire": "Firewalls" of particles may border black holes, confounding both general relativity and quantum mechanics. "Fishing for Billions": How a small group of visionaries are trying to feed China – and save the world’s oceans. "Conquer Yourself, Conquer the World": Self-control is not just a puritanical virtue. It is a key psychological trait that breeds success at work and play – and in overcoming life’s hardships. "How to Survive Cyberwar": Like it or not, we are all combatants in the fight to secure cyberspace.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, January 2015

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    "Better Than Earth": Planets quite different from our own may be the best homes for life in the future. "Will We Still Enjoy Pinot Noir?": Winegrowers are trying to preserve the flavor of your favorite reds and whites as climate change alters the compounds in grapes. "In Search of Sunken Treasure": Scientists are using exotic technologies to excavate underwater shipwrecks with the same precision as an archaeological dig. "A Weakness in Bacteria’s Fortress": Evolutionary biologists are trying to attack bacteria in a new way.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • The Science of Intuition

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 39
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 14
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 13

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Diet, Health, and the Food Supply

    • Scientific American
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    There are five fascinating articles in this issue. You'll hear how globalization ushered in a world in which more than a billion people are overfed - even though 800 million still suffer from hunger. Then, learn how to cope with a mountain of conflicting diet advice. Also, find out if books that question the dangers of being overweight are wrong. Then, discover new ways to fight fat. Plus, hear about new approaches to protecting your food from contamination.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, May 2008

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "The Chaotic Genesis of Planets", "Science 2.0: Is Open Access Science the Future?", "Regulating Evolution: How Gene Switches Make Life", "Hooked from the First Cigarette", and "Nuclear Fuel Recycling: More Trouble Than It's Worth".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, August 2008

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Facing the Freshwater Crisis"; "Why Migraines Strike"; "Bracing for a Solar Superstorm"; "Self-Cleaning Materials"; and "Magnifying Taste".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, September 2016

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 28 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 2

    In this issue: "What Mark Will We Leave on the Planet?": Our influence is written in the geological strata. "Who Will Prosper and Who Will Fall Behind?": Quality of life on an increasingly crowded planet depends on decisions made today. "Will We Defeat Aging?": Drugs already in trials could significantly extend healthy human life spans. "Can We Trust Our Own Predictions?": What a Science Fiction writer knows about predicting the future.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Question?

    • By Peace on 10-03-16

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Creativity

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American Mind
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 124
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 25
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 25

    The cover story in this issue explains how creativity and brilliance arises in all of us. Then, we'll take a look at the latest theories behind the experience commonly known as 'deja-vu'. Also, we'll learn about a mental breakdown that causes apathy so extreme it could become deadly, as well as Capgras syndrome, a perception disorder that causes people to think their loved ones have been replaced by extraterrestrial body doubles.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Loved it

    • By Prospyros on 08-16-05

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Why Migraines Strike

    • Scientific American
    • By: David W. Dodick, J. Jay Gargus, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 23 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 36
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 21
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 23

    Biologists have solved the mystery of one of our most misunderstood, poorly recognized, and inadequately treated medical disorders. This article was published in the August 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • What we know -- and don't know -- about migraines.

    • By Kestrel on 06-10-16

    Regular price: $1.95

    • The Neuroscience of Dance

    • Scientific American
    • By: Steven Brown, Lawrence M. Parsons, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 15 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    Recent brain-imaging studies reveal some of the complex neural choreography behind our ability to dance. This article was published in the July 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Memory, Fear & Anger

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 50 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 93
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 21
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 23

    The cover story reveals how painful, long-term memories might actually be erased with the use of drugs at just the right moment. Then, an article that asks a provocative question - can we cure fear? Following that, it's an examination of anger -- should you control your emotions or let them rip? Next, it's a look at the persistence of myths -- and their connection to the brain's biological needs. Our fifth article seeks to explode one myth -- about the value of self-esteem.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • New Insights About Leadership

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 53 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 22
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 4

    This edition includes six fascinating articles. You'll learn the secrets of effective leadership and hear how language influences our choices - from foods we eat to the laws we support. Also, discover how experts are finding out how acts of violence in schools can be predicted. Then, find out how the brain balances social concerns with economic decisions. Next, learn about the two to three percent of the population that can't recognize faces. Finally, hear why students are dropping out of college.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • July 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 24 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "Memory's Intricate Web": A technical revolution provides insight into how the brain links memories. "Black Holes from the Beginning of Time": A hidden population of black holes born less than one second after the big bang could solve the mystery of dark matter. "How Cities Could Save Us": Urban areas can improve the planet as well as people's lives if we design them to be much more resourceful. "Operation: Diabetes": Surgery that shortens intestines gets rid of the illness, and new evidence shows the gut – not simply insulin – may be responsible.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • The Teen Brain

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 29 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 42
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 10
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 10

    In the cover story, "The Teen Brain: Hard at Work. No... Really!", science reveals the ongoing changes underlying adolescent behavior. Next, you'll hear how researchers are achieving amazing results treating severely depressed patients by implanting an electrode in the brain. Then, you'll get some insights into why some people turn violent, and why some faint at the sight of blood.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Good

    • By Horace on 01-19-17

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Dinosaurs

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 2 hrs and 55 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 33
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 15
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 14

    First, hear about fish-shaped reptiles that thrived in the oceans while dinosaurs ruled the land. Then, learn about the evolutionary history of whales, the mammals that conquered the seas. The most famous of all dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus Rex, gets a fresh look as scientists re-examine fossil evidence for clues as to the tyrannosaur¿s actual behavior. Also, learn about some ancient Australian marsupials that were as ferocious as they were bizarre. Then, "Which Came First, the Feather or the Bird?", and more.

    Regular price: $5.95

Show titles per page
  • 1
  • 2
  • ...
  • 13