Regular price: $14.95

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Editorial Reviews

Editors Select, October 2014 - Listening to Arundhati Roy's Capitalism: A Ghost Story is one of those experiences where you constantly find your mouth agape and brow furrowed in that 'how-can-this-be' kind of way. In the book, Roy powerfully depicts the suffering and destruction that unchecked capitalism has wrought upon her country of India. She describes how the over-extension of India's natural resources has resulted in total ecological obliteration (dead rivers, empty wells and stripped forests) and how the imbalance of wealth and power has led to immense human devastation, with more than 250,000 farmers committing suicide to escape crushing debt. But grisly statistics aside, it's Roy's unyielding courage in reporting these facts and condemning the powers-that-be that makes this an essential listen. —Doug, Audible Editor

Publisher's Summary

From the poisoned rivers, barren wells, and clear-cut forests, to the hundreds of thousands of farmers who have committed suicide to escape punishing debt, to the hundreds of millions of people who live on less than two dollars a day, there are ghosts nearly everywhere you look in India. India is a nation of 1.2 billion, but the country's 100 richest people own assets equivalent to one-fourth of India's gross domestic product. Capitalism: A Ghost Story examines the dark side of democracy in contemporary India, and shows how the demands of globalized capitalism have subjugated billions of people to the highest and most intense forms of racism and exploitation.

©2014 Arundhati Roy (P)2014 Audible Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    46
  • 4 Stars
    10
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    1

Performance

  • 4.1 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    27
  • 4 Stars
    12
  • 3 Stars
    8
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    3

Story

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    39
  • 4 Stars
    8
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Courageous Reporting

Listening to Arundhati Roy's Capitalism: A Ghost Story was one of those experiences where you constantly find your mouth agape and brow furrowed in that "how-can-this-be" kind of way, reeling again and again over the ways in which Roy depicts the suffering and destruction that unchecked capitalism has wrought upon her country of India. The over extension of India's natural resources has resulted in total ecological obliteration – dead rivers, empty wells and stripped forests – and the imbalance of wealth and power has led to immense human devastation, with over 250,000 farmers committing suicide to escape crushing debt. But grisly statistics aside, it's Roy's unyielding courage in reporting these facts and condemning the powers-that-be which make this an essential listen.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Ruthless but eye opening to truth

Learn of the plight of the 99% against the 1% of the richest people in the world
A MUST READ

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A concise distopian report on India

Arundhati Roy is one of the best writers that I have ever heard. She is able to condense complex matters to a human level. What you will learn as she tells the tragedy of India is that the author is compassionate, committed, modest, fearless, factual, intelligent and indefatigable. Of course, she says nothing about her personal qualities but they shine through as she describes the sufferings of millions because of capitalism.

Since the United Nations is considering a woman for its next General Secretary, there would be no better candidate that Arundhati Roy. Now wouldn't that make the UN relevant?

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Doesn't hold back

Roy has refused to hold back in her book and exposes the truth of what capitalism has done for India. Cleverly written and a pleasure to read!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful