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No Beast so Fierce

The Terrifying True Story of the Champawat Tiger, the Deadliest Animal in History
Narrated by: Corey Snow
Length: 8 hrs and 8 mins
Categories: History, 20th Century
4 out of 5 stars (74 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

American Sniper meets Jaws in this gripping, true account of the deadliest animal of all time, the Champawat Tiger - responsible for killing more than 400 humans in Northern India and Nepal in the first decade of the 20th century - and the legendary hunter who finally brought it down.

At the turn of the 20th century, in the forested foothills of the Himalayas between India and Nepal, a large Bengal tiger began preying on humans. Between roughly 1900 and 1907, the fearsome beast locals called the Champawat Man-Eater claimed 436 lives. Successfully evading both hunters and soldiers from the Nepalese army and growing bolder with its kills, the tiger - commonly a nocturnal predator - prowled settlements and roadways even in broad daylight. Entire villages were virtually abandoned.

Desperate for help, authorities appealed to Jim Corbett, a then-unknown railroad employee of humble origins who had grown up hunting and tracking game through the hills of Kumaon. Like a police detective on the trail of a human killer, Corbett questioned villagers who had encountered the tiger and began tracking its movements in the dense, hilly woodlands - while the animal began to hunt Corbett in return. When the big cat attacked a teenager and dragged her away, he followed the blood trail deep into the forest - a harrowing, dramatic chase that would ultimately end the man-eater’s long reign of terror and turn the young Corbett into a living legend.

In this rip-roaring adventure and compelling natural history, Dane Huckelbridge recreates one of the great adventure stories of the 20th century, bringing into focus a principled, disciplined soldier, hunter, and conservationist - who would later earn fame for his devotion to saving the Bengal tiger and its habitat - and the beautiful, terrifying animal he patiently pursued. Written with the thrilling immediacy of John Vaillant’s The Tiger, Susan Casey’s The Devil’s Teeth, and Nate Blakeslee’s American Wolf, No Beast so Fierce is an enthralling depiction of a classic battle between man and animal, human encroachment and wild nature that resonates today.

©2019 Dane Huckelbridge (P)2019 HarperCollins Publishers

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Needed more tiger

I guess I was expecting more of a Jaws with a tiger, but instead, No Beast So Fierce, delves into the history of colonialism in India and its impact on the environment and the populace. It was all interesting, and parts were extremely well written. You'll definitely gain a newfound respect for the power of these beautiful and deadly predators. The lead-up to the actual Champawat tiger is very gradual, and then suddenly it's all over and the books winds down with an epilogue about the man who shot her, Jim Corbett, who later went on to defend tigers and advocate for their protection in the wild.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Fascinating Foray Into An Incredible Time

Incredible. The evocation of time and place is immediate and vivid. The historical research is extensive and utterly fascinating. With almost surreal desciptions of aberrant tiger behavior and insanely visceral man-eater-hunting set pieces, No Beast So Fierce is a can't-miss tale of evolution, empire, and ecology. Highly recommended!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Nostalgic,profound, enriching, well researched page-turner

With an immense sense of childhood nostalgia and profound feeling of gratitude, while driving kids back and forth from San Diego, I finished reading/listening to this book - “No Beast so Fierce” over the weekend. Such a great read - took me back to the good old past - my childhood - when life was hard yet simple and stories were so fulfilling. Jim Corbett and his stories like ‘Man-eaters of Kumaon’ did carry the idea of adventurism, literary enrichment and vivid animation to my childhood. Being an integral part of my growing up, I felt the warmth of the Shikari stories, noblesse oblige as I fondly read thru this page-turner by Dane Huckelbridge. I will not consider it as a mere mortal story about a blind hunt but a work written with compassion and empathy - a complete package describing way beyond the incidentals on the flora, fauna, animals of the times. In one brush stroke of imaginative fact-filled penmanship, this well researched work takes you thru the biodiversity, history and geography of India and its forests - along with the changing attitudes of its cats and people that co-inhabit and co-inherit them.

Now My rating 5/5 as a portion of proceeds from purchase of this book will go towards Tharu cultural Museum and wellbeing of a Tharu people.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Perfect weave of history, nature and biography

I selected this book as a Daily Deal because I had enjoyed Vaillant's The Tiger and Matthiessen's The Snow Leopard. No Beast So Fierce and take its place beside them. Excellent storytelling, excellent narrator.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Tony
  • PORT ORCHARD, WA, United States
  • 02-14-19

Sorry, couldn't listen to it.

The narrator overacts to a cringeworthy degree. Get him back in the studio and just read the dang book please. Let me know when it's done and I will buy it again, this version is not listenable.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Solid book minor complaints

The only real issue I actually had was it seems to expand and over literate what was already obvious information from previous parts in the book. It may have got too deep into the history of some stuff not directly related to the tigress. But very informative and over all a good read if you’re into wildlife, hunting, and/or history. The complains are really just nit picking so nothing major!

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This was an amazing book!

Really great information about India's Culture and the struggles that they faced along with great story telling and awesome narration.

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Just read man-eaters of Kumaon.

The book is does a good job of setting up the historical placing of kumaon , by giving you an overview of British and Indian's relationship at the time. After that however its mostly the author talking about his own interpretations of British imperialism. this was annoying, but the biggest issue in my opinion was the errors in the story. There are several deviations and embellishments that the author makes from Corbetts firsthand account. If you want to know what hunting the Champawat man-eater was truly like read the book written by the man who did it, not an embellished book report that takes liberties with the source material.

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Narrator ruins it

Gosh ! Like a bad tv ad man voice ; narrator ruins this interesting story. Who okayed This One I Would Really Really Like To Know!
EACH word is emoted ... I’m not that stupid that I need this .

1 of 2 people found this review helpful