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Publisher's Summary

Gaslit London is brought to its knees in David Morriell's brilliant historical thriller.

Thomas De Quincey, infamous for his memoir Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, is the major suspect in a series of ferocious mass murders identical to ones that terrorized London 43 years earlier.

The blueprint for the killings seems to be De Quincey's essay "On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts". Desperate to clear his name but crippled by opium addiction, De Quincey is aided by his devoted daughter, Emily, and a pair of determined Scotland Yard detectives.

In Murder as a Fine Art, David Morrell plucks De Quincey, Victorian London, and the Ratcliffe Highway murders from history. Fogbound streets become a battleground between a literary star and a brilliant murderer, whose lives are linked by secrets long buried but never forgotten.

©2013 David Morrell (P)2013 Hachette Audio

Critic Reviews

"An absolute master of the thriller." (Dean Koontz)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Historical Fact + Fiction = Gothic Mystery

Morrell has done an able job of blending history with fact to create a page-turning study of 1854 London. The work focuses on real-life English author Thomas De Quincey (Confessions of an English Opium-Eater), whose essay "On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts" focused on the infamous Ratcliffe Highway murders of 1811. In Murder as a Fine Art, a copycat murderer who is both recreating and upstaging the Ratcliffe Highway murders lures De Quincey and his strong-willed, freethinking daughter Emily to London just in time to frame De Quincey for the tragedies. The resulting novel is both a gothic thriller and a thought-provoking and affecting contemplation of memory, addiction, and guilt.

I especially applaud Morrell for his Afterword essay, which explains not only how he researched and incorporated true history into his mystery, but also how he altered his writing style to mimic 19th-century sensationalist literature and incorporate De Quincey's own words. His generous list of works consulted is wonderful and most appreciated.

I give this four rather than five stars because the prose sometimes feels clunky and the pacing irregular. Emily, in particular, not only feels like a one-note, too-good-to-be-true stereotype (a "Mary Sue," if you will), but she also snags the rhythm at times by launching into righteously indignant monologues on women's fashion or prison reform at improbable times in the midst of action. Tidbits of description also appear extraneous on occasion. I mostly blame Lyndsay Faye for my reaction to this, as reading her recent novels has spoiled me and led me to expect other authors of historical fiction to fold their extensive research seamlessly into narratives without pausing for jarring "infodumps."

None of these criticisms detract, however, from the fact I quite enjoyed and definitely recommend this novel. With Matthew Wolf's excellent narration, it's well worth a listen.

32 of 33 people found this review helpful

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very well done

I had reached a point with David Morrell's books where I couldn't remember if I'd read his books just by looking at the title and sometimes the summary. So I was pleasantly surprised when I came across this book which appeared to be a stab at a new genre for him. Having lived most of hs adult life in Iowa and New Mexico, it was intriguing that he would try and write a murder mystery set in London in the mid 1800's. He pulled it off quite well and if he continues with the genre I'll give him another try. The painstaking research this effort must have taken to tie a real life character, some 40 year old murders tied into crimes of the time were very well done. This wasn't a crime thriller like many where it becomes a page turner but I thoroughly enjoyed this story and would recommend giving it a try.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Great story + fantastic narration = A Fine Art!

Would you listen to Murder as a Fine Art again? Why?

This time era has always held a fascination for me since I discovered Sherlock Holmes when I 10 years old. The story sounding intriguing, so I thought I'd give it a go. It is VERY evident that Mr. Morrell did extensive research into the time & location in which he set his story. Characters are fleshed out well & both intellectually & emotionally distinct, plot is tight & the descriptions are so detailed you can't help but feel you're right along beside the characters on the spooky, fog-laden streets of London. I should add the details aren't done in a laborious way. He walks the tightrope of giving you what the reader/listener needs, to create the visual without being bogged down. No synopsis...you can get that above; but his blending of historical fact & fiction is seamless. I almost forgot at times it was a fictional portrayal of a few factual characters. It was engrossing & kept my attention throughout.

Which character – as performed by Matthew Wolf – was your favorite?

The main protagonist....De Qunicy. Morrell's writing of the character & Wolf's performance made him jump out in 3-D fashion. Brilliant, flawed, frustrating & courageous....that only begins to describe the complexity of this character.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

One of my biggest praises is Matthew's Wolf's narration of this great book. I have the Kindle version as well; but often I chose to actually 'read' very little of it. Why? Because the job he did on the narration was that WELL DONE! Surprisingly I found myself just 'following along' with the highlighted Kindle passages as I listened. I don't think a man can ever do a true-sounding woman's voice justice, so the voice of Emily wasn't the best. However, the slight change in syllable emphasis, pitch & tone of his voice with the other characters gave the feel of a multi-person cast. It truly captured the essence of the time & place.

Any additional comments?

Whether you read or listen, I can't recommend this book more highly. It certainly is one of the most enjoyable reads I've experienced & definitely one of the finest narrations I've heard for a work of fiction ever.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Spellbinding!

Any additional comments?

If you love historical mysteries you won't be sorry you spent a credit on this one. Great storytelling and fascinating historical detail. I understand the author researched his brains out for this and it shows. And I was really happy to hear that a sequel is in the works. Go for it, you won't be sorry!

16 of 17 people found this review helpful

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Trip into Victorian London

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes, it is a great combination of a good thriller and history.

What other book might you compare Murder as a Fine Art to and why?

Kind of reminded me of The Maul and the Peartree, which makes sense since both discuss the same historical mystery.

Have you listened to any of Matthew Wolf’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Not that I know of, but this one is great. I really appreciate that he didn't attempt an American (or Canadian) accent when reading the afterward.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

No, it was more of an intellectual journey, but a good one of those. It is pretty graphic about violence and crime scenes, though. I advise caution about eating while listening to it. (Or maybe I'm the only one who eats while listening to audiobooks;-).)<br/>Not for the extremely squeamish.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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5 Stars All-Around!

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Due to listening to this book, I can now define the niche genre of "Victorian Gaslight Mysteries and Thrillers." I always liked this genre, but didn't have a name for it, exactly. I intend on reading/listening to much more of this category, but they may pale in comparison to this one. I don't give 5 stars for everything very often. The story was so totally engrossing and you could really get the feel of being there. Morrell described the lifestyles, customs and conduct of all levels of Victorian society so very well and then created an equally compelling mystery. I was so amused by the regular concern of various male character's that Emily (De Quincey's daughter) or "a lady" must leave the room, or could not hear the more graphic or certainly violent descriptions of police work or even relatively innocent conversations, by today's standards. And I had no idea that in Victorian England, that a surgeon was a step below a physician and that a physician (who treated the upper classes) would never touch his patients. Totally nuts, but that was accurate, I'm sure. And then Matthew Wolf did a superb job as narrator and dramatically enhanced what was already such a very well-written tale. Then the bonus of the post-script was very interesting. If you're a history buff or a fan of this genre or just a mystery fan, I think you'll love it.

What did you like best about this story?

I liked it all. But besides the terrific story, Matthew Wolf's narration was spot-on.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Maybe, but it was always nice to come back to later.

13 of 14 people found this review helpful

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Dark, foggy days indeed.

Where does Murder as a Fine Art rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

As an insomniac I started listening to audiobooks as an alternative to simply staring at a dark ceiling. This book should be near the bottom of my favorites for keeping me up even longer.

Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

The plot was great but it was the events that really happened (some pretty shocking) and the author's and narrator's ability to make you feel as if you're in the dark waiting for a knife in the back that kept my attention.

Which character – as performed by Matthew Wolf – was your favorite?

Mr. Wolf did a fantastic job with all the characters even though a man doing a woman's voice doesn't work too well but there was instance when he did a female voice that sent shivers up my spine. NO SPOILER! As much as I wanted to seek him out and choke him for that I understand that is what he is paid for.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Of course not. I wanted to go to sleep but this was a much more entertaining version of counting sheep. If anyone is looking for a nodder, this ain't it.

Any additional comments?

Anyone interested in history and likes a good mystery can appreciate this book.

12 of 13 people found this review helpful

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Good but not great!!!

Very enjoyable period mystery. Highly recommended if you enjoy the genre. Not as good as some claim it to be, Caleb Carr I believe is great, this is good but not of the same caliber as the Alienist... Do read it, enjoy it, and if you have not read the Alienist put it on your list....

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

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Solid Read.

Heavy in the true crime arena with some gaps in character development. Overall, solid read with decent narration. I will read the next book in the series and hope for more character development.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

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This is a Fine Art Indeed!

Murder Fine Art when penned by David Morrell.

Within the first 20 I was thrust into a savage murder and the snared with the need to discover how it was going to unravel. David Morrell does an accurate portal of the Victorian Era and the method of police investigation. You can feel the fog rolling over the land and the race of the horses down the street. The hook is Thomas De Quincey. The intellectual addict with a dismissive attitude of the polite society lives with nightmares and physical agony ignited by his slavery to laudanum.

He has debased himself with his laudanum usage and made his family live in poverty. His memoir, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, earned the disdain of the classes of the Victorian Era, because it brought to light the world of drug use. Yet, opinions of others are never his concern. He is humbled with the insults and scorn from people. He is aware of his relationship with laudanum, his addiction, his fights to quit, his physical/mental pain he need for laudanum. De Quincy cavalier openness about Opium in his writings/and usage precipitate the brutal murders of families. The prevalent of the drug is what drives the antagonist.

This is the first story of the De Quinceys and the Scotland Yard detectives working together. They are tracking a murder who is recreating historical murders that De Quincey analysis. ***spoiler*** What is common in De Quincey stories (I read them out of order) he is the first suspect and jailed LOL. De Quincy’s small stature always get its five minute of fame. In this book, the jail attack on De Quincy was suspenseful.

He has an intelligent, liberate daughter Emily, who plays Watson to De Quincey. Emily has no compunction to patience with the rules of society which put women on a pedestal. She takes charge, manipulates and shames men in their inability to treat her as an equal. Privy and flagellation are the words which aghast the men. She is an outrage to the police officers when she demands to stay at her father, even when it means staying with him in jail. She is an outraged to men and women wearing bloomers, which shows her leg movement, to forgo the 35 pounds of weight of fabrics used in hoop skirts and the constriction of the corset. She is a modern girl!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful