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Publisher's Summary

The year is 1924. The streets of St. James ring with jazz as Britain races forward into an age of peace and prosperity. London's back alleys, however, are filled with broken soldiers and still shadowed by the lingering horrors of the Great War.   

Only a few years removed from the trenches of Flanders himself, Lieutenant Eric Peterkin has just been granted membership in the most prestigious soldiers-only club in London: the Britannia. But when a gentleman's wager ends with a member stabbed to death, the victim's last words echo in the lieutenant's head: that he would "Soon right a great wrong from the past".   

Eric is certain one of his fellow members is the murderer. But who? Captain Mortimer Wolf, the soldier's soldier thrice escaped from German custody? Second Lieutenant Oliver Saxon, the brilliant codebreaker? Or Captain Edward Aldershott, the steely club president whose Savile Row suits hide a frightening collision of mustard gas scars?   

Eric's investigation will draw him far from the marbled halls of the Britannia to the shadowy remains of a dilapidated war hospital and the heroin dens of Limehouse. As the facade of gentlemenhood cracks, Eric faces a Matryoshka doll of murder, vice, and secrets pointing not only to the officers of his own club, but to the very investigator assigned by Scotland Yard.

©2018 Christopher Huang (P)2018 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"Huang surrounds his engaging lead character with a meaty supporting cast, many of whom quickly become suspects with tantalizing motives. The mystery itself is clever and should keep even the most experienced whodunit finders guessings. We hope [this] will be only the first of many Eric Peterkin adventures." ―Booklist

"Dorothy Sayers is alive and well and writing under the name of Christopher Huang. A Gentleman's Murder echoes the traditional mysteries in the best sense: no car chases or explosions, just great characters and a feel for time and place." ―Rhys Bowen, New York Times best-selling author of The Tuscan Child and two-time winner of the Agatha Award 

What listeners say about A Gentleman's Murder

Average Customer Ratings
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  • Overall
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Your little grey cells will be delighted with this murder mystery

I was hoping all the reviews were correct... was it really a whodunnit written in the style of Golden Age of detective stories? Yes, is was an intriguing story and so much more. I found myself so wrapped up in this mystery that I would set a time in my day to actually brew some tea and listen to my book. I savored this mystery as much as my tea. It was made more poignant due the fact that I finished it on Veterans Day and on the 100 year anniversary of WW1.Christopher Huang, I hope this isn’t my only encounter with Eric Peterkin and the Britianna Club.
Mr. Corkhill did a superb job with the narration.

9 people found this helpful

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Hope this is the beginning of a series

Thoroughly enjoyed this mystery written in the classic tradition. Also, very much enjoyed the authors notes at the end. Well done!!! If you are tired of psychological thrillers, gore, swearing, tiresome unnecessary sex scenes, you will appreciate this well thought out novel.

7 people found this helpful

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Its like being one of the boys

In this book you get a birds eye view of an exclusive British club after WW1 and the characters who inhabit it. It is told in the first person which really works for this private and intimate male sanctuary. It deals with the inherent racism in Britain at that time,with a curious mixture of male social behaviour, British reserve and army etiquette thrown in for good measure. Secrets and lies abound and a murder occurs. Eric Peterkin is an outsider due to his mixed race heritage, but tolerated to different degrees by the various individuals. He begins to try and solve the murder in an ever unfolding narrative where secrets are exposed and a mosaic of the crime comes together thru Peterkin’s eyes. The mystery is a maze, with many wrong turns and stumbles. Peterkin’s method is intuition and attack and he is not afraid to be unliked. He makes mistakes but his resolution is firm and he slogs thru mud to get to the truth. It is an image of the trench warfare that they have experienced, a inch forward and then two back. The characters are wonderful and the plot is complex and imaginative.

5 people found this helpful

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Ignore the indiscriminate ire. It’s great!

The negative reviews I’ve read here punish the author for writing neither Agatha Christie PG-rated language nor a Tom Clancy action book. I gave this book 5 stars BECAUSE it is so unusual. It’s set in one of my favorite eras but acknowledges the WWI “shell shock” effects. Further, having a half English/half Chinese protagonist allows exploration of the attitudes of the day but doesn’t dwell on them. I confess I did not make out the murderer until the end but I’m not a person who goes back over the previous text for clues, although I often both read and listen to a book - they are completely different experiences for me. This was very well written compared to most of the awful stuff on Kindle in this genre and the narrator was very good, I’d listen to him again gladly.

Get a life, people! Giving zero stars or 1 star must mean you’ll be trying to give future listens or reads a negative five stars when you get to something that is truly awful. This promising young author hardly deserves your indiscriminate ire. Just trade it in and move on.

3 people found this helpful

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Throw-back Mystery - Lots of Fun

I enjoyed this book so much! The story was great and the setting was done perfectly, I believe.

I think Huang should write a jillion books and I will buy them all.

1 person found this helpful

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Loved it!

He is very good at giving you the clues you need to put the picture together. Absolutely can’t wait for his next one.

1 person found this helpful

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Fun Traditional Mystery

All of the evidence was there, you just have to put it together for yourself. That's the most fun part of a good mystery for me. Can't wait for more books like this from Christopher Huang

1 person found this helpful

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Good ole mystery

A mystery novel that keeps interest well. I have no dissappointment and will deliver greatly

3 people found this helpful

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The Great War's Aftermath

This story is both a great mystery and great literature. It's Rudyard Kipling meets Ellery Queen, but with a sophistication several notches above the hard boiled style of the latter. I suspect that Arthur Conan Doyle would have loved it.

Some of the below criticism is baffling. The charge that it's too wordy could only have been written by someone from our emoje/email era. The charge that it's racist is simply de rigueur comentary leveled at virtually everything today. And the charge that the book includes only a few weak women as characters is baffling, considering, first, that the story takes place in a men's social club and involves a plot that began on the battle fields of WW I; and, second, that two of the strongest and most interesting characters (one of whom is dead the entire story) are women.

This book will have long-lasting appeal and we can only hope that its author wiil produce more books of comparable quality.

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Wish I'd liked it better

Huang put a lot of effort into this one, for which I him full credit; in his Author's Notes at the end, he details the extensive research. The setting, therefore, came through well. So, why only three stars? The characters and plotting not so much.

Where to begin... Eric misses his deceased parents, talking "with" them at their graves. Later in the book, there's a reminiscene of a memory of his mother, but otherwise nothing much (that I recall); nor anything specific from his sister. Would've helped to have perhaps presented a scene from his youth in confronting prejudice, especially involving advice from his father (he was quite young when the mother died). He says he has no resentment that his sister isn't as obviously Asian (to whites), but somehow I'm not buying that wasn't always the case. I just didn't feel I knew him, as though behind a see-through barrier.

A quick followup that we learn very little about his good friend, Avery. Unless I fell asleep or seriously spaced out during the listening, not even how they met? I came away knowing only that he's a sort of Wooster-ish figure with a series tarot fetish! I know a few serious readers, so was struck by his aggressively he pushes readings on people (granted, gratis); that aspect almost completely defines him.

The club members seemed a bit stereotypical (cardboard, I suppose), though a degree of conformity was expected. Not saying they're interchangeable, but that I didn't really care about them. Perhaps the hinted sequel will resolve that?

The murder mystery itself wasn't a bad idea. Indeed, I felt we got to "know" the cold case victim as well as any of the live actors. So, the plotting itself worked okay, just that I didn't feel fully engaged. A note here that the book description's reference to the Limehouse opium den proved disappointing when it came - a rare setting failure by the author.

So, do I recommend the story? Well... yes. I can think of a couple of series I like, where I wasn't fond of the first book. Somehow, I suspect this may be another. On the other hand, many readers loved this one, so if that group ends up including you - congrats!

Solid audio narration a definite plus here!