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Editorial Reviews

By now, Adrian McKinty’s reputation for solidly crafted Irish crime novels is well-established. Equally familiar is the context into which this latest narrative is dropped. McKinty spent his childhood in Belfast at the height of paramilitary conflict there, and Falling Glass centers around a minor character from his Michael Forsythe trilogy that is steeped in precisely those historical influences. Killian, a legendary IRA heavy, emerges from retirement for what appears to be an easy money job of rescuing some rich businessman’s kids from their drug-addled mother. Naturally, complications abound and Killian soon finds himself in fierce competition with an apparently invincible Russian hit man on a case that evolves into something much uglier than a straightforward kidnapping scheme.

Throughout this debacle, Killian’s Pavee senses of humor and realism never abandon him. He has the dry wit and keen improvisational reflexes of a man raised among the Irish gypsies, which gets him into and out of trouble in equal measure. McKinty has a discerning ear for Killian’s banter, colorfully supported by Gerard Doyle’s authentic brogue. Doyle has won numerous audio awards, but perhaps more importantly, has also been with McKinty every step of the way. As narrator for the entire Michael Forsythe trilogy, Doyle is not only aware of this new novel’s background, but has also already established a clear sense of voice for many of this novel’s chief characters.

Although Forsythe takes a back seat in this story, fans of the previous trilogy will be gratified by the return of Doyle’s vision for the voice work, and find a credible set of new developments among beloved characters. But this novel is also quite capable of standing alone, and listeners who are coming fresh to Adrian McKinty’s work will not have any trouble picking up the story’s thread, thanks in part to Gerard Doyle’s confident hold on the reins of the narration. McKinty and Doyle obviously have a good chemistry going, and the conclusion of Falling Glass satisfyingly leaves plenty of room for the development of a Killian trilogy. —Megan Volpert

Publisher's Summary

Richard Coulter is a man who has everything. His beautiful new wife is pregnant, his upstart airline is undercutting the competition and moving from strength to strength, his diversification into the casino business in Macau has been successful, and his fabulous Art Deco house on an Irish cliff top has just been featured in Architectural Digest.

But then, for some reason, his ex-wife Rachel doesn’t keep her side of the custody agreement and vanishes off the face of the earth with Richard’s two daughters. Richard hires Killian, a formidable ex-enforcer for the IRA, to track her down before Rachel, a recovering drug addict, harms herself or the girls.

As Killian follows Rachel’s trail, he begins to see that there is a lot more to this case than first meets the eye and that a 30-year-old secret is going to put all of them in terrible danger.

Falling Glass is an Audible.com Best Thriller of 2011.

©2011 Adrian McKinty (P)2011 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

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  • Susan
  • Bartonville, TX
  • 04-14-14

Falling down

A woman on the run with her children to keep from losing them to a tyrannical ex-husband who has unlimited recourses. Somewhat predictable with a slow plot that finally moves along towards the last third of the book. The characters were likable but here again predictable.

The narrator for me was fairly monotone but others thoroughly enjoyed.

6 of 8 people found this review helpful

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  • Sharon
  • United States
  • 12-08-12

Couldn't hold my attention

I listen to audio books in the shower, in the car, during excercise, but I just couldn't finish this book. It didn't hold my attention. I'm not sure if it was the narrator or the story. Sorry, I don't like to give negative reviews, but if I didn't finish the book because I was bored, I'm not going to give it positive reviews.

8 of 11 people found this review helpful

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Adrian McKinty always tells a great story.

The narrator is the same as the last 6 McKinty books I've read and he's excellent. The writer and narrator make a perfect team. This one threw me a little because I'm still unsure of the ending. I hope the writer will write another Killian book so I know for sure.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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I listen for the narrator

I have listened to several Adrian McKinty books and enjoy them all. The stories are typical police novels set in Northern Ireland. Most are part of a series, but this one stands alone. The main character is a "tinker" which I had never heard of before. It is a traveling community in Ireland who travel the country living in caravans (trailers). The main character leaves this life to become a private detective but he maintains the skills he learned as a Tinker including stealing cars, breaking into homes and shooting guns. THe last is not his favorite" activity, but will kill when the circumstances require it. At the end of the book he has to do plenty of that to protect a woman and her child.

What makes these books great for audio is the narrator. With a real Irish brogue, you feel transported to Ireland. He can do both mens and women's voices quite well. These books I am not sure I would read, but love the audio versions.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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A great listen

Love this story. It's a non-stop suspenseful thriller, that keeps you on the edge of your seat
awaiting the outcome. Killian thinks he's trying to locate an addict ex-wife and children for his client. As the story unfolds, he finds himself being followed and close to death. Something is up with this job, it's too simple to have such a high payout. Thus, the stakes get higher as an old secret comes to light. The story doesn't disappoint right up to it's thought evoking end. Gerard Doyle does an excellent job bringing the Irish feel to the book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Louanne
  • Santa Fe, NM, United States
  • 03-24-14

As Good as James Lee Burke

I have a difficult time with the level of violence and dark, destructive life styles. However,
McKinty's skill is so superlative, his writing so gorgeous, the narration so brilliant, I persevere. He reminds me of James Lee Burke in his skill level. And I don't make it through all of his books either.
I have read four books. I am anxious for the next Sean Duffy novel. Michael in New York is more difficult for me. If you can handle the violence these are fabulous stories!!!!! For me MIchael Connelly, James Patterson, and the longish list of formulaic production writers pale. I have not enjoyed stories this much since Stieg Larrson. ------P. S. I am a sucker for the Irish accent.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Kd
  • CLINTON, MS, United States
  • 02-20-14

Great characters, story, folklore

This book is so good I struggled to know where to begin to talk about it. As the opening of the story indicates, an important and wonderful theme throughout the story is the role of Killian’s ethnic history and folklore. If you don’t like that sort of thing—though I dare you not to like it in this story and told by this great narrator with the engaging lilt—then you will likely not enjoy this story as much as I did. Another great aspect of the story is the characters and their full development interpersonally and intrapersonally. You get a clear picture of the world, of what’s going on, and are able to answer some “why” questions, to understand. This book is a moderate thriller combined wonderfully with an aspect of drama at its best. That’s what makes the so good. It’s a combination piece just like real life is. And the balance of the two genres really works. Also, there are no big coincidences that authors so often use to tie things together. This book is entirely plausible and therefore, enjoyable. And the narrator only adds to the great experience of this book. I don’t really have a complaint, but I will say that this is a story that doesn’t really jump out of the gate. It’s a story that improves as you get into it. So it takes a bit of time to see how good it is. I think that’s both good and bad about the story. And, be warned that the ending is unbearable, gut-wrenching and superb. I could go on, but I won’t. You get the gist. Get the book.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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utter drivel

This is my first listen to this author, and its most likely to be the last. It seems like the story is firmly aimed at the US market and its description of Ireland seem direct from some tourist board brochure. The story romanticises the traveller lifestyle. The protagonist freely admits to doing this in the story itself.
The characters are all "hard men" but in reality are "lovely" "family men".
The prose drifts in to the poetic and lyrical at the oddest moments.

Couldn't finish it and would advise to steer well clear.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Paula
  • Overland Park, KS USA
  • 05-11-13

McKinty Has Done it Again!

Adrian McKinty has done it again. This story is simply wonderful even though I must admit it has numerous grisly accountings of murder and mayhem. What I liked is the way McKinty wove so much history, human interest and mystery into a grand plot that kept moving. I found myself finding it hard to turn it off because I couldn't wait to hear what happened next.

Loved the inclusion of history and myth in relation to the bands of "travelers" or Irish "tinkers.". I loved even more the incomparable narration of Gerard Doyle. No one could possibly do it better.

As a mystery/thriller, this one is stellar!

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Sandy
  • Orlando, FL
  • 03-27-13

Loved this story and Narrator

I had never listened to Gerard Doyle before. I can't listen to most English accent narrators. But this Irish accent was so fun to hear.
I will now search for more of his books along with the author of this story, Adrian McKinty.
The story was believable, fun, and a great thriller. I loved the Character of Killian.
He's on the bad side of Crime but through the story, your on his side the whole way.
This is a must purchase. You won't regret it.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful