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Publisher's Summary

The Black Russian is the incredible story of Frederick Bruce Thomas, born in 1872 to former slaves who became prosperous farmers in Mississippi. A rich white planter’s attempt to steal their land forced them to flee to Memphis, where Frederick’s father was brutally murdered. After leaving the South and working as a waiter and valet in Chicago and Brooklyn, Frederick sought greater freedom in London, then crisscrossed Europe, and - in a highly unusual choice for a black American at the time - went to Russia in 1899. Because he found no color line there, Frederick made Moscow his home. He renamed himself Fyodor Fyodorovich Tomas, married twice, acquired a mistress, and took Russian citizenship. Through his hard work, charm, and guile he became one of the city’s richest and most famous owners of variety theaters and restaurants. But the Bolshevik Revolution ruined him, and he barely escaped with his life and family to Constantinople in 1919. Starting from scratch, he made a second fortune by opening celebrated nightclubs that introduced jazz to Turkey. However, the long arm of American racism, the xenophobia of the new Turkish Republic, and Frederick’s own extravagance landed him in debtors’ prison. He died in Constantinople in 1928.

©2013 Vladimir Alexandrov (P)2013 Blackstone Audio

Critic Reviews

"Peter Marinker's narration of how the restaurant and nightclub entrepreneur gained and lost fortunes sounds like a novel. Gripping from the start, Thomas's story is told from a the viewpoints of tourists, government officials, and Thomas himself--as well as through published reports. Marinker's voice proves flexible as he conveys the attitudes of bureaucrats, condescending American tourists, Thomas's friends and loyal employees, and Thomas's correspondence. Vladimir Alexandrov gives listeners a short course in the racial attitudes and changing politics of Russia and Turkey during this time period." (AudioFile)

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  • Jeffrey
  • CASA GRANDE, AZ, United States
  • 06-12-16

An incredible story.

Fantastic! Excellent narration, too. Treat yourself to a truly unique story about a past era.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

US Born African Descendant 2 Russian Citizenship

Genealogy & Historian will LOVE this Story. It is a detailed account of his escape & transition into freedom & independence....and so it is.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Little known part of Russian history

What made the experience of listening to The Black Russian the most enjoyable?

A surprising story. I know a lot about Russian history, but the story of an African-American's success in per-revolutionary Russia is unexpected.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

Sad, but somehow not surprising.

What three words best describe Peter Marinker’s performance?

Competent, easy-to-listen-to, adequate pronunciation of Russian.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

A Black American Entrepreneur in Russia

  • Overall

uhmmm

This book was okay not the best ive heard but it brought to life the idea of a black man not being bound to the US.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful