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Publisher's Summary

Throughout history, food has acted as a catalyst of social change, political organization, geopolitical competition, industrial development, military conflict, and economic expansion. An Edible History of Humanity is a pithy, entertaining account of how a series of changes---caused, enabled, or influenced by food---has helped to shape and transform societies around the world.
©2009 Tom Standage; (P)2009 Tantor

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Average Customer Ratings

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  • Rachel
  • YAKIMA, WA, United States
  • 11-29-12

Interesting information, distracting accents

The information contained in this book is excellent, full and very interesting. I was disappointed with the frustrating narration and slightly stilted organization of the writing. Regardless of the minor writing style distractions and the major narration distractions, I would highly recommend the book.

I recently read Tom Standage's "History of the World in 6 Glasses." Similar to "An Edible History of Humanity," 6 glasses is a not-quite-chronological and broad-ranging history of the world focused on one aspect of humanity. Also similar to 6 glasses, Edible History is organized what feels like a 5 paragraph essay format or a textbook chapter. Standage starts with his general introduction to the chapter topic, fills it out with specific examples, interesting details and related stories or anecdotes. Unfortunately, he tends to then restate his "thesis" or the main chapter points before moving on to a related but separate topic which he introduces using similar phrasing to the previous topic introduction. I found this annoying at first (in both books) but was less bothered as the audiobook progressed (I skimmed the summaries in the 6 glasses book which I read instead of listening to).

The narrator's faults I had more trouble moving past. When the book began I thought I was listening to a filmstrip narration or an educational video being show during a particularly boring elementary school class. Later, when I had come to terms with the filmstrip-voice (though I never liked it), I was pained by the voices used by the narrator to distinguish quotes from various famous characters in the book. The Christopher Columbus voice was annoying, the Adam Smith voice was painful and the French pronunciation was painful to anyone who doesn't expect a nasal R in people and place names.

My frustrations with repetition and terrible narration aside, I enjoyed the book greatly. I was particularly pleased with some explanations on various topics that were more complete and more clear (except when spoken in French) than those I have read in previous books. I tend to devour a lot of this sort of book--idiosyncratic histories of specific topics--and I felt like this book was a complement to those I have read. On the few occasions when the author repeated information I already knew, he generally quickly related it to his topic of food and other ideas he had also been discussing.

Though the book suggests it will simply be a history of food, the author does an excellent job of integrating and incorporating politics, world events and individual experiences into his interpretation. I look forward to reading more of Tom Standage's work (hopefully with a different narrator).

There were a few remarkable specific areas where Standage improved upon my previous understanding of events or issues. Standage gave a much better explanation of the development of maize than I encountered in my previous reading (particularly Gavin Menzies' problematic 1421). I also was fascinated with the discussion of the health benefits of hunter-gather societies over agricultural ones and the explanation of why the nutritionally inferior agriculture took over and transformed the world.

Unfortunately I took notes for this book on my iPhone Audible App and the automatic spelling correction has replaced my note about something in 6000BCE in the near east with "bug blogs" I'm guessing they didn't have bug blogs in 6000BCE, so I'll have to go back and figure that out.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Eric
  • Valparaiso, IN, USA
  • 08-13-09

A big heaping feast of history

An Edible History is a wide world history of food, agriculture, and society. Standage, who wrote the wonderful book "The Victorian Internet" about the rise and role of the telegraph, writes even more comprehensively about food and it's role in history. It's rich with detail and yet paints a broad picture of food, economics, and science across thousands of years and the entire globe. The audio production is crisp, even with the occasional strangely acted-accented quotation.

A high quality, well written work translated effectively for the audio format.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Vicky
  • Prince Rupert, British Columbia, Canada
  • 11-24-09

factual & entertaining

As a social history buff, I really enjoyed this factual, yet entertaining account of history as seen through food. It reminds me of Guns, Germs & Steel, another of my favs. Works as an audiobook as well.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Entertaining as well as enlightening

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Definitely. I found this book to be extremely interesting and stimulating. It puts much into perspective and ties together things that deepens one's understanding of history and the world.

What does George K. Wilson bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He allowed me to enjoy the book with my eyes shut as well as walking in the street.

Any additional comments?

I do not agree with some listeners here who compare this book unfavorably with Standage's A History of the World in Six Glasses. I loved that work, but found this one just as good. Both have enriched my mind and given me some very enjoyable moments. Both recommended without reservation.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Very concise and simple

I am a big fan of world history books. Tom Standage is one of the best. I listened to the History of the world in Six Glasses first, which I also highly recommended. This is another first rate title, which I felt achieved its end in a lot fewer words than say, Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond. It is along the same lines as some other books I endorse. 1491 and 1493. One of which I read and the other I listened to. If you have ever wondered where the food we take for granted came from this book traces the history of such things as potatoes, corn and rice in great detail. It compares today's computer driven science to the the science of food production in the previous centuries. He makes the point that half of us wouldn't even be here if it wasn't for the breakthrough of fixing nitrogen from the air into the soil and further creating more efficient genetic hybrid dwarf plants to feed our ever increasing population. I found the fact that sugar can be produced on a small amount of land, even though it is labor intensive is probably a good reason for it's proliferation as a cheap additive to our burgeoning food supply. I discovered that rice can be grown in poor soil and never needs to be rotated like wheat or potatoes. No wonder we have so many people in Asia. I also found it interesting that most of the successful countries got that way by first securing their own food supply and then diversifying their economies into other areas. This was a great pleasure to listen to and my attention only flagged at a few points during this great book. Otherwise I would have given it five stars all the way. What could be more sacred than man's connection to food.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Brandon
  • SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA, United States
  • 06-29-13

A Unique Perspective on World History

Most histories of the world focus on political, diplomatic, military, social, or cultural motivations, this work is unique, it approaches world history from the perspective of a commodity that is both our most important necessity and our most widely recognized luxury: food. In the 21st century we often lose sight of the fact that until 100-200 years ago food was the most important motivating factor in people's lives, for the poor it was a matter of life and death, for the rich it was one of the few real luxuries available and, along with one's clothes and one's estate, the defining element of their social status. This book details how food launched the age of exploration, fueled the industrial revolution, threw the world into war, and brought about the fall of communism. A fascinating fresh take on human history.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Andrew
  • ATLANTA, GA, United States
  • 04-30-13

Not as good as "6 Glasses"

How could the performance have been better?

Narrator was not engaging and slow. I had to speed the reading up in order not fall asleep. The narrator for Standage's other book made the book come to life, this narrator did not.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Interesting, not really memorable

Any additional comments?

I came into this after finishing A History of the World in Six Glasses by Tom Standage, and while he presents some interesting points about the impact of food on history, it isn't as catchy or memorable as the first book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Dull

What disappointed you about An Edible History of Humanity?

The narrator was so monotone that I nearly fell asleep...while jogging.

What could Tom Standage have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Had any inflection in his voice, or interest in the subject.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

He took a fairly interesting subject and read it like only the most boring college professor can.

What character would you cut from An Edible History of Humanity?

n/a

Any additional comments?

Though the subject matter seem interesting, this book ends up making it more like a dull botany class.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Not as good as 6 Glasses

Material was fine. Nowhere near as good as 6 Glasses. Narrator was abysmal. Truly killed any enjoyment. I do NOT recommend. Thanks.