Regular price: $26.60

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

We know the legends: Arthur brought justice to a land that had known only cruelty and force; his father, Uther, carved a kingdom out of the chaos of the fallen Roman Empire; the sword Excalibur, drawn from stone by England's greatest king.

But legends do not tell the whole tale. Legends do not tell of the despairing Roman soldiers, abandoned by their empire, faced with the choice of fleeing back to Rome, or struggling to create a last stronghold against the barbarian onslaughts from the north and east. Legends do not tell of Arthur's great-grandfather, Publius Varrus, the warrior who marked the boundaries of a reborn empire with his own shed blood; they do not tell of Publius's wife, Luceiia, British-born and Roman-raised, whose fierce beauty burned pale next to her passion for law and honor.

With The Camulod Chronicles, Jack Whyte tells us what legend has forgotten: the history of blood and violence, passion and steel, out of which was forged a great sword, and a great nation. The Singing Sword continues the gripping epic begun in The Skystone: As the great night of the Dark Ages falls over Roman Britain, a lone man and woman fight to build a last stronghold of law and learning - a crude hill-fort, which one day, long after their deaths, will become a great city...known as Camelot.

©1996 Jack Whyte (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    177
  • 4 Stars
    74
  • 3 Stars
    18
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    3

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    161
  • 4 Stars
    64
  • 3 Stars
    17
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    7

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    164
  • 4 Stars
    66
  • 3 Stars
    19
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    3
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Jack Whyte's masterpiece finally gets on Audible

I have waited a long time for the Camulod Chronicles to get on Audible. I was furious that these were supposed to be released in early June, then on the day of release without any explanation , the release date was switched to August 20. I looked everywhere for a reason and there was nothing on any of Jack's or Audible's fan sites. I guess it will be a mystery forever. It also took a ridiculous amount of time to get them released on the kindle.

This is one of those rare books that is served well in audio format. I actually liked the audio performance better than the reading the book. Kevin Pariseau does an admirable job with the different characters. I look forward to hearing the Eagles Brood

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

King Arthur comes from Rome

When I first read these book a decade ago, I thought they were at the top of their game. They're still great for many reasons, but one thing I missed the first time around is the shear amount of exposition. Much of it is necessary, but most not necessarily so. It would be easy to argue that the primary narrative and story of the books are told in exposition. So if this author's previous works weren't enjoyed by you or you thought other works had too much exposition (like, say Pillars of the Earth) you might be wary. But, what the author does to make up for the amount of exposition is posit an entertainingly plausible story of how King Arthur stepped out of the world left by the fall of Rome. And I still enjoyed that story the second time around.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Good but too much fluff

Would you listen to The Singing Sword again? Why?

Yes - I like the writer and the overall story.

Have you listened to any of Kevin Pariseau’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Yes - he is excellent! He keeps my attention throughout the novels, even when the text drags a bit. Love his voices!!

Any additional comments?

This book is good, but there are a few hours that drag by and are unnecessary. Also some sex scenes that I'm not interested in - I'm interested in the historical events and the fictional battles. The sex scenes get into more detail than I'd care for.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

read the book instead

the narration is awful.. just awful. pariseau ruins all of the dialog with pitiful inflection and the most unlife-like tones of voice. but the story is great, read it instead.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

This story has it all!

I bought this before understanding that it is part of a series. I need to go back and listen to the first. It's such a lovely story that I'll listen to it again after listening to the first. War. Sex. Love. Loyalty. Death. Near death. Torture. Care. This book has it all!

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • J.
  • Moorhead, MN, United States
  • 12-08-14

Interesting approach to Aurthorian legion, but...

This is not your T.H.. White or Disney Camelot. Though fictional, it is rooted in historical fact and depicts an Arthurian legion denuded of its magical trappings. In that sense Whyte's version is refreshing. Even before the first book of the series is done, however, the reader begins asking. "Can't we move things along a bit faster?" By the end of this second volume it's clear Whyte is needlessly stretching what should be at most a trilogy into a meandering and plodding saga of nine (and counting) books each about 25 hours in length. Aside from its slow pace, the dialogue has an anachronistic flavor and the supporting characters are one dimensional. Pariseau is a competent narrator and I like his reading of John Barth's work, but Arthurian legion demands a Brit.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Matthew
  • Sidney, British Columbia, Canada
  • 09-03-13

Good story, rough reading.

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

Sure, why not. The description of Roman Britain was really interesting and i was looking forward to this as I read and enjoyed the first book. I just found the reading of the book was stilted and didn't add to my enjoyment of the book.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful