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Publisher's Summary

Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning author Richard Rhodes reveals the fascinating history behind energy transitions over time - wood to coal to oil to electricity and beyond.

People have lived and died, businesses have prospered and failed, and nations have risen to world power and declined, all over energy challenges. Ultimately, the history of these challenges tells the story of humanity itself.

Through an unforgettable cast of characters, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Rhodes explains how wood gave way to coal and coal made room for oil, as we now turn to natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable energy. Rhodes looks back on five centuries of progress, through such influential figures as Queen Elizabeth I, King James I, Benjamin Franklin, Herman Melville, John D. Rockefeller, and Henry Ford.

In Energy, Rhodes highlights the successes and failures that led to each breakthrough in energy production, from animal and water power to the steam engine, from internal combustion to the electric motor. He addresses how we learned from such challenges, mastered their transitions, and capitalized on their opportunities. Rhodes also looks at the current energy landscape, with a focus on how wind energy is competing for dominance with cast supplies of coal and natural gas. He also addresses the specter of global warming and a population hurtling toward 10 billion by 2100.

Human beings have confronted the problem of how to draw life from raw material since the beginning of time. Each invention, each discovery, each adaptation brought further challenges, and through such transformations we arrived at where we are today. In Rhodes’ singular style, Energy details how this knowledge of our history can inform our way tomorrow. 

©2018 Richard Rhodes (P)2018 Simon & Schuster Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Does not disappoint.

An in depth analysis of energy from wood to nuclear to renewables. Rhoades recounts the history of how society, whose existence, limitations, and growth ultimately depend on energy. As those of you who have read his Pulitzer Prize winning book, "The Making of the Atomic Bomb" will note his work is unbiased, straightforward an approach to history. This departs from that only in the final chapter when necessity forces him to draw conclusions from history and project these forward in time. Although some disagreement may exist on the precise nature of how the future might unfold, no thinking person can disagree with the general idea of these conclusions. An excellent work of history and prescient futurism combined.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Rich In Technical Detail Regarding Inventions

This book is rich in technical detail regarding many of the greatest inventions of the industrial revolution. It provides an enlightened perspective on the development of various forms of energy to the development of the world's economies. One glaring flaw in the oral presentation is the reader's mispronunciation of several well known words or syllables. For example the reader consistently mispronounces "gigawatt" as though it were spelled "jigawatt."

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Poor narration

I did not like how the narrator performed various accents, otherwise the book was fine.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Rhodes si, accents no!

Rhodes’s book Is engaging but is not easy to listen to. Mr. Roy’s attempts at accents are unfortunate and amateurish. He has a pleasant and clear voice. If only he had just read the book and omitted the histrionics.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Educational and inspiring

Richard Rhodes impresses again. By winding little-known tales of discovery and invention into a narrative he brings the reader on a tour through the history of human mastery of energy sources.

In addition to the history of energy, it is an instructional journey through the trials and tribulations integer this to technological progress.

I plan on using this book as a supplemental text in my engineering courses and encourage all educators of technology, science, and history to do so as well.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Soporific narration.

The book is good, but did not meet my high expectations. The reader has a soft tone that when combined with the dry material makes for a sleepy listen. Reader’s decent but unnecessary attempts to inflect foreign accents on quoted material were distracting.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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No more accents, please!

Hello to Audible narrators, Audible producers, Audible editors: I love your books. I love your service. But please please PLEASE don't use foreign accents when reading nonfiction. It's painfully distracting. This is a terrific book. But, just to take one example: the French inventor Denis Papin did not speak English with a bad French accent. He spoke French. We know that, and we don't need to be reminded of it. When you're reading an English translation of his words, it doesn't help to say it in a bad French accent. Or a good French accent. Or a French accent of any kind. It actually makes it very hard to concentrate on the text. I'm begging you not to do this with other nonfiction books. I might not have ordered this book had I realized how much of this I would have to listen to.

But it is a good book!

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Fascinating story

This is a fascinating story about many different sources of energy. The narrator is gifted at different accents, but his overall tone is rather somnolent.

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Great book. Boring narration

I learned a lot about energy sources and discoveries. It’s unfortunate that I had to stop listening many times because the narration was so slow and inanimate. It sounded like it was read by a robot.

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Not as comprehensive as perhaps is warranted today.

It is a history, so no peek into what may be just over the horizon, such as “gasoline from sunlight” an industrialization of what plants do with photosynthesis - make a liquid source of energy with sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water. And because he wanted to write a much shorter book, this is not nearly as comprehensive as his two books on the making of the atomic and nuclear bombs. But still, a worthwhile listen. And he makes a great case for keeping nuclear energy as part of the mix of future electrical generation.

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  • D. Jarenicz
  • 06-06-18

Interesting topics, very well narrated

I have listened to Richard's previous books and always enjoyed them. This was also enjoyable, strayed off topic sometimes. Great narration

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  • Pierz Newton-John
  • 07-12-18

Excellent book but please spare us the accents!

This is not quite the riveting read that Rhodes' account of the making of the atomic bomb was, but still a very comprehensive and interesting history of the development of energy technologies from the start of the coal age. Jacques Roy has a pleasant voice to listen to, but he has alas fallen prey to the pernicious fashion for reading historical quotes in the accent of the person being quoted. Unfortunately his accents are truly execrable and do nothing but annoy and distract. Please Audible narrators, just stop it.