Regular price: $12.57

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

When a jealous Zeus discovers that the compassionate Titan, Prometheus, has introduced the gift of fire to liberate mere mortals from oppression and servitude, he has Prometheus bound to a rocky prison in the Scythian desert, where the god discloses the reason for his punishment.

Prometheus Bound is one of only seven surviving plays by the prolific Athenian playwright, Aeschylus. Born into a noble family in 525 BC, Aeschylus is credited with having introduced dialogue into the Greek drama, and indeed is a father of modern theater.

©2010 Mission Audio (P)2010 Mission Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    15
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    2

Performance

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    10
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    12
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    2
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Tad
  • Philadelphia, PA, United States
  • 12-20-10

A one-man show

Robin Field appears to be doing all the voices in this production. Given that, it's more dramatic than might be expected: he's acting out the play, not simply reading it. If Field were less skillful, it could be dismissed as a vanity production. But it doesn't quite work for me. I have two complaints: in a couple of scenes, the voices are close enough together that it's difficult to tell immediately who's speaking; and the translation Field uses is a very poor one, from the standpoint of English style: an early-twentieth-century imitation of "Bible English" taken from Harvard Classics. (Probably easy on the royalty department, but hard on the ears. Surely there are better public domain translations available.)

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A one-man show

Robin Field appears to be doing all the voices in this production. Given that, it's more dramatic than might be expected: he's acting out the play, not simply reading it. If Field were less skillful, it could be dismissed as a vanity production. But it doesn't quite work for me. I have two complaints: in a couple of scenes, the voices are close enough together that it's difficult to tell immediately who's speaking; and the translation Field uses is a very poor one, from the standpoint of English style: an early-twentieth-century imitation of "Bible English" taken from Harvard Classics. (Probably easy on the royalty department, but hard on the ears. Surely there are better public domain translations available.)

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Poor Translation, Fair to Good Performance

Would you try another book from Aeschylus and/or Robin Field?

Aeschylus is the first great Greek tragedian. He's worthwhile & important to read.

What did you like best about this story?

Explores a conflict between Zeus and Prometheus.

Did the narration match the pace of the story?

Narration was fine but with only one person playing all parts it was not, at times, easy to distinguish who was speaking, particularly with sections of stichomythia. When music was provided as accompaniment for the choruses, they became difficult to hear clearly. The music was cheesy and distracting.

What character would you cut from Prometheus Bound?

None! The play is a classic and should not be cut or abridged.

Any additional comments?

The translation was poor. It's language was anachronistic. The translation used words such as "hest" and thus the play sounded Elizabethan not ancient Greek. I'm very familiar with Shakespeare's plays and it sounded to me like the translator wanted to make the play sound Shakespearean, which in my opinion is not a good idea. The translation was the worst part of this audiobook version of the play.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

different narration needed

I like Greek myths and drama but this was hard to follow due to the fact that the one guy does all the stage directions and all the characters so there is no differentiation, nothing to signal a new character and so the speeches all blend together. You lose track of the dramatic push for each speaker. So while I continue to listen and study the dramas, this one is a bit tough.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

yes I would highly recommend this book to anyone.

Awesome. This is a great books for everyone, especially students. I'm happy I read it.