We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
Liner Notes Audiobook

Liner Notes: On Parents & Children, Exes & Excess, Death & Decay, & a Few of My Other Favorite Things

Regular Price:$24.49
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

A memoir by the influential Grammy Award-winning singer and actor - son of journalist Loudon Wainwright, former husband of Kate McGarrigle and Suzzy Roche, and father of Rufus Wainwright, Martha Wainwright, Lucy Wainwright Roche, and Lexie Kelly Wainwright - a captivating meditation on relationships and creativity from the patriarch of one of America's great musical families. With a career spanning more than four decades, Loudon Wainwright III has established himself as one of the most enduring singer-songwriters who emerged from the late '60s. Not only does he perform regularly across America and in Europe, but he is a sought after actor, having appeared in such movies as The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up, and Sleepwalk with Me and TV series ranging from M*A*S*H to Person of Interest to Parks and Recreation.

There is probably no singer-songwriter who has so blatantly inserted himself into his songs about parents, grandparents, children, siblings, and wives. As he puts it in "So Many Songs": It's taken so long to finally see / My songs about you are all about me. The songs can be laugh-out-loud funny, but they also can cut to the bone. In his memoir, Wainwright continues to emphasize the personal. He details the family history his lyrics have referenced and the fractured relationships in the Wainwright family throughout generations: the alcoholism, the infidelities, the competitiveness - as well as the closeness, the successes, and the joy. Wainwright reflects on the experiences that have influenced his songwriting, including boarding school, the music business, swimming, macrobiotics, sex, incarceration, and something he calls Sir Walter Raleigh syndrome.

The book is very much about being a son - a status that dominates many of Wainwright's songs. But it is also about being a parent, a brother, and a grandfather. Wainwright's song lyrics are represented throughout the book, amplifying his prose and showing the connections between the songs and real life. He also includes excerpts and selections from his father's brilliant LIFE magazine columns - and, in so doing, reestablishes his father as a major essayist of his era. A funny and insightful meditation on family, inspiration, and art, Wainwright's memoir will thrill fans, listeners, and anyone who appreciates the intersection of music and life.

©2017 Loudon Wainwright (P)2017 HighBridge, a Division of Recorded Books

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.6 (7 )
5 star
 (6)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
4.4 (7 )
5 star
 (5)
4 star
 (1)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.6 (7 )
5 star
 (6)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Feather San Francisco, CA, United States 10-08-17
    Feather San Francisco, CA, United States 10-08-17 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    60
    RATINGS
    REVIEWS
    65
    33
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    11
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Too much ham and corn, not enough meat"

    I have never had an opinion of Loudon Wainwright's work--neither positive or negative. But I generally like memoirs, and heard him interviewed on Fresh Air, so I got the book. Several things bugged me about it: 1) the story wasn't told chronologically, each chapter was a discrete topic and so he ended up repeating himself frequently, and it was hard to perceive any progression in his career and/or character development; 2) he was constantly trying to be funny and he wasn't--to me it seemed pretty corny; and 3) his hammy style in reading detracted from the story. I also felt that his description of his teenage sex life and masturbation practices was gratuitous and cliché. Full disclosure--I stopped listening after about six hours. (I was a captive listener as I was driving across North Dakota.) He sprinkles in many of his own songs which could be a positive if one likes his music. Maybe the book got better--I'll never know. If you like celebrity memoirs I highly recommend Rob Lowe's Stories I only tell my Friends, Bruce Springsteen's Born to Run, and Eric Clapton's autobiography.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.