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Publisher's Summary

He was the Western convert who would plunge deep inside al-Qaeda. He named his first son Osama after 9/11 and became a Jihadist. But then - after a sudden loss of faith - Morten Storm made a life-changing decision. He became a double agent and joined the CIA, MI6 and MI5.

Filled with hair-raising close calls and deception, Storm's story builds to the climactic finale when he must betray his friend and mentor, al-Awlaki - al-Qaeda's biggest threat to the West. Storm is trusted to find al-Awlaki a wife from Europe. She becomes the bait for a possible American drone strike.

©2015 Morten Storm (P)2015 Penguin Books Limited

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Brilliant book, powerful story, engaging narration

This is one of my favourite books in Audible. A moving story and great narration. Five star and highly recommended.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Faye
  • 10-11-15

good honest account

interesting story which came across very honest with the author admitting to all his bad deeds aa well as his good ones that followed, I personally feel for all his efforts he has not been rewarded or treated nor protected adequately by the government agencies who he helped so much to catch terrorists, gripping story too, highly recommended x

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Anonymous User
  • 09-07-17

a great listen and highly recommend

It's a book that grips you from start to finish, Great twists and turns throughout
Highly recommend

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Neil Hollingworth
  • 01-31-18

Detailed and intense excellence

What made the experience of listening to Agent Storm the most enjoyable?

The book was heavily detailed which gave a lot of insight, but the way Morten Storm's life suddenly changed to religion, and then 10 years later equally suddenly he lost the faith and the consequences that had, were most interesting.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Morten was by far the most interesting character, but the author built up a very vivid picture of all characters that he came into contact with

What about Neil Shah’s performance did you like?

Neil Shah read the text eloquently and dynamically. He managed to wrap his tongue around the many difficult Arabic names and was a joy to listen to.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The most startling events where how the government agents wanted to suddenly wash their hands of Morten when things got sticky. Also very surprising is how the whole agency business revolved around money.

Any additional comments?

The book starts well but after a few chapters I started to flag. He went to his new brothers in Arabia and a lot of detail was there and at first I thought that the whole book might be like this and I was starting to struggle. But hang in there, by chapter 10 it starts to get very interesting. I listened to this each morning on the way to work and often sat in the car park for an extra 10 minutes riveted to what was playing out. I've finished the book and funnily enough I miss it now!

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  • Andy
  • 01-27-18

Brilliant!

Very enjoyable book, and well written. leaves me wondering where Storm is now and what he's doing.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Mr
  • 07-18-17

Interesting but...

...A little hard to follow at times and the pace didn't work well for me. The readers accent was unusual but you quickly get used to it, remembering names was a challenge.

More like a good piece of journalism, the book definitely has value and with a different setup could be riveting.

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  • Katrina
  • 06-15-17

Unexpectedly brilliant!

Stick with it initially - it is worth it - much better than expected - the set up and background is essential to the future unfolding of an incredible story - excellently and authentically read with great characterisation - great value for my 1 credit

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  • Martyn
  • 01-12-17

great book

loved it a great book with lots of twists and turns and it opens your eyes to what's going on down the road from you

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  • Lance Johnson
  • 08-07-17

A sad story

If you could sum up Agent Storm in three words, what would they be?

False, Interesting, Sad

What other book might you compare Agent Storm to, and why?

In the process of reading...

Have you listened to any of Neil Shah’s other performances? How does this one compare?

Nil

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

See below

Any additional comments?

This story centres around the following: a man seeking fame and fortune - to fill a hole inside his heart, that would never be filled. He apparently was a Muslim convert, that eventually rejected the faith, and became a double agent, spying on Al-Qaeda for Western intelligence agencies. I am afraid this man is a professional liar, so much of this story is likely not true, or severely twisted. Try to listen to story between the lines: look at what he means, not what he writes. The other is to gleam some information on the operation of intelligence agencies including CIA, MI5, and PET(Danish CIA).

The protagonist of the story is Morten Storm, a man born in a broken home who never got love or approval of his parents. He was a troubled boy, and I am afraid, from his own story, a troubled man. This is evident in the story when he went as a man to see his birth father who had left his mother when he was young, and was rejected. I suspect his involvement in Islam, Spying, publishing this book etc was to try to get this approval from all his peers and family, to be accepted and respected. This is evident when in the story he forces the Danish Intelligence agencies to tell his mother directly what he was doing as a double agent.

My feelings on this book can be summarised in the following.

1. Why this book is released.
I suspect the intelligence agencies could have easily stopped this book. They either could taken him out, or used laws such as the Secrecy Act to gag or arrest him. Make no mistake the intelligence agencies wanted this release. At this time he still lives in the West. Remember Assange was under house arrest, Snowden is stuck in Russia, Richard Tomlinson is in jail in France and Chelsea Manning was in jail for secrets revelations. And these are only the more prominent people, I am sure there are many others in jail we will never hear about. Perhaps the agency wanted to use this as they thought it possibly as good PR.

2. Intelligence agencies actively radicalise people
"If you don't have permission, create an event to get you permission" If you want to get permission to slap your brother, fake evidence that he ate out of the cookie jar. If you want to arrest people, put pressure on them such as restricted movement, healthcare, and then when they get angry, blame them for being unfair. A lot of the extreme fringe groups, are full of CIA/intelligence agents who recruit and actively radicalise people, so that minorities can be villified. Awlaki was not radicalised until after his 9 month stint in a Yemeni prison, complements of the CIA. Also a young Croatian girl was sent to Awlaki as a wife by this spy, who probably was not radicalised until after she was sent to Yemen. At no point in the story did Morten try to convince anyone to not undertake terrorism, in fact, he fostered it, then collected money leading to the arrest of the radicalised person, he had helped radicalise.

3. This man probably never converted in the first place.
Although he says he converted to Islam, I suspect he never did but was a trained intelligence agency throughout his so called "Muslim" activities. This idea is nothing new, and is employed by the Police to infiltrate a movement.

4. This man and the intelligence agencies are severely corrupt, and morally bankrupt
Both he and the agencies, indulge in illicit such as cocaine use to the the use of prostitution.

I could go on and on.

Should you read this book?
Yes, if you are interested in spy fables, not necessarily to get to the truth.

I pity Mr. Storm, no matter how successful he is, or how much money he gets, he will, forever, never be able to get happiness, when he continues to see outside rather than within.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Pete
  • 03-14-18

Incredible story

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

A story largely unknown in Australia, and absolutely recommend understanding the bigger picture.

What did you like best about this story?

The significance of what Morten did is understated even in the book.

Which character – as performed by Neil Shah – was your favourite?

The narrator was brilliant.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Hard to put down.