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Publisher's Summary

In this darkly comic memoir, a young woman recounts the steps she took to rebuild her sense of self in the aftermath of two devastating strokes that robbed her of her ability to communicate.

Nina Mitchell was an accomplished Harvard graduate whose world changed forever when her facility with language - and much of her personality - disappeared. Lacking the tools to navigate her old life, Nina was forced to create another one. In After Words, she shares her remarkable journey as she slowly reclaims the power to converse, write, assert her identity, and to be herself - with words.

Nina Mitchell’s After Words is part of Missing, a collection of six true stories about finding, restoring, or accepting the losses that define our lives - from the mysterious to the inspiring. Each story can be listened to in a single sitting.

©2018 Nina Mitchell (P)2018 Brilliance Publishing, Inc. all rights reserved.

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Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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Brillant !

It is a journey of selfdiscovery and relearning si many basic skills like a new baby.

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When a Stroke Takes Your Words

A compelling and insightful story of the authors ordeal in overcoming two strokes that left her not only physically impaired, but mentally as well; taking away her cherished cognitive capabilities.

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very moving memoir

This is a moving story about a young woman's struggle to repair her speech, body, and mind after suffering two strokes.

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Interesting Short Story about a Woman's Struggle to Heal.

I received and listened to this book for free because of an Amazon Prime Reading perk that included audible narration. The story is just a little over an hour long and tells of a woman’s experience after having had not just one, but two strokes. The author told a very poignant story about her experiences and frustrations with her circumstances. She was a highly intelligent and very successful woman who was suddenly unable to communicate her most basic thoughts. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, I was struck by the author's persistence and perseverance as she described the work and therapy she endured to resume a life that would be as normal as it could be under the circumstances. The narrator did a great job of reading this book. I’m glad I had the opportunity to hear this story.

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Overall I liked it

It piqued my interest until a haughtiness began whispering in the background. Why its it that a Harvard graduate character with "smarty pants" friends beginning their own companies, who lives in LA then in Boston with Harvard chums, being the most educated, most popular, most intelligent in their own mind, talking to scientists and experts, etc, seems to be lacking in a real world sense of things. And why is it that a very good writer like Nina Mitchell would appear to look down on others who work hard at making people happy in her fictional world and outside of it. I really don't feel that this attitude shift was needed, especially toward the end because I felt that the story was done well enough without the pretentiousness to impress or to imply a level of sophistication to clash with the calamity of a stroke. That cheapened it a bit because it seemed to imply that even with suffering two strokes, the character managed to defy the bad odds to rise above it and return to a near normal state. When that began to filter into the picture, I had to remind myself that this is fiction. But, overall, I thought it was well written as far as the details of the strokes and the accuracy of that reporting. I liked how it moved in and out of being gravely ill to better, then worse, then manageable, then awkward, then enduring, emotional, degrading, hopeless, fulfilling, wasteful, wanting. But in that, there was a lack of true compassion throughout for those she cared about and especially for those who cared for her....making her smarter than it and even more daring than it, when in fact 'it' was in control all along....the way it normally is, in spite of what the writer would fancy it to be.