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Publisher's Summary

Seabury Quinn's short stories were featured in well more than half of the pulp magazine Weird Tales' original publication run.

His most famous character, the supernatural French detective Dr. Jules de Grandin, investigated cases involving monsters, devil worshippers, serial killers, and spirits from beyond the grave, often set in the small town of Harrisonville, New Jersey. In de Grandin there are familiar shades of both Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot, and alongside his assistant, Dr. Samuel Trowbridge, de Grandin's knack for solving mysteries - and his outbursts of peculiar French-isms (grand Dieu!) - captivated for nearly three decades.

Collected for the first time in trade editions, The Complete Tales of Jules de Grandin presents all 93 published works featuring the supernatural detective. Presented in chronological order over five volumes, this is the definitive collection of an iconic pulp hero.

©2017 The Estate of Seabury Quinn; Jules de Grandin stories copyright 1925–1938 by Popular Fiction Publishing Co.; Jules de Grandin stories copyright 1938–1951 by Weird Tales (P)2017 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

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Such Fun !!

These stories, and Seabury Quinn, are new to me and I enjoyed listening to this so excellent volume. I intend to buy the hardbacks also, and understand that there will eventually be five volumes. Mr. Paul Woodson did an admirable job of suggesting Grandin's accent and voice s well as the rest of the characters. I would like to hear more of his readings.

6 people found this helpful

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Weird Tales at its best

These Jules de Grandin tales prove that great stories can be created using worn out cliches if well handled and, as in this case, well read. I had previously read perhaps 10 de Grandin stories that I found OK but unremarkable. After listening to this huge collection I must revise my earlier opinion. Jules de Grandin actually is one of the greatest caracters from the pages of the great Weird Tales!

4 people found this helpful

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  • d
  • 04-23-18

This is the good one

These collections of short stories are very good and this reader for this volume does a good job. I am not buying the second audio book became the narrator was changed for the worse, but these can be bought and enjoyed separately.

2 people found this helpful

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Good for the medium

If judged as a novella or even as serious pulp, it would grade lower. As it is merely a collection of cliche occult stories, the 3 stars are for the wide variety and colorful scenery. Overall, it is fun to listen to as a way to pass the time, but the characters don't evolve, they are entirely predictable, and the plots' arcs are transparent from the first paragraphs.

6 people found this helpful

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Could we get Ian Gordon to read please?

I loved the stories, however, it took awhile to adjust to the narrator's voice especially for the French doctor. Still a good listen if you enjoy Weird Tales Magazine.

1 person found this helpful

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Excellent adaptation of an oft forgotten author.

Fun and fast stories, great narration, really well done. Its good to see Quinn's stories getting a second life.

1 person found this helpful

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Pleasantly surprised.

Jules de Grandin, the French love child of Hercule Poirot and Sherlock Holmes; and his sidekick Dr. Trowbridge can't seem to go anywhere in Harrisonville New Jersey without stumbling upon some strange mystery that if not outright supernatural at least has the appearance of the supernatural. This selection gets better as it goes along as the quirky characters have a chance to grow on you. Grandin, whose arrogance knows no bounds, wears purple lizard skin slippers with his purple pajamas and is always needing either food or drink. Though Trowbridge has seen many inexplicable things during his friendship with Grandin, he never seems to believe that anything is supernatural until it slaps him in the face. He is in a constant state of incredulity. It doesn't help that Grandin never takes the time to explain to him what is going on or what the actual plan is. These two characters play well off of each other.
This series was the most popular series in Weird Tales magazine and it is easy to see why. Yes it is formulaic. There is always a scantily clad (if not nude) damsel in distress and Grandin is always throwing out his French expressions. It is simply pulp fun. It is surprising that these tales aren't more well known.
The narration is very good.

1 person found this helpful

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A really fun collection of spooky stories

I absolutely adore this character and his weird adventures, though terribly corny and not particularly well written it's fun and that's what counts. Seabury Quinn had his finger on the pulse of how to make a story appealing while sprinkling in some truly appalling descriptions and upsetting revelations. If you need a paranormal adventure that bends your mind and challenges your perception of the workings of the world, this is probably skippable content. That said if you want a dose of fun, gory, pulp-horror adventure with an awkward hint of romance, it's a must-have.

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Good, except for the Racism!

One expects some hints of racism in most books written before 1950, but Seabury Quinn makes H.P. Lovecraft look like a civil rights advocate. His villains are almost always foreigners from “strange dark parts.” Even his good guys are stereotypical characters of Irish, French, etc.
In one story the hero gleefully commits genocide by massacring an entire village of Islanders with a mounted Lewis Gun.
Other than that the stories are fun, and the narrator is Excellent!

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  • Sheridan Le Fanu
  • 12-30-19

Pulp fiction at it finest

No Nobel prizes for literature will be awarded here but if you just want a number of short entertaining listens then this collection delivers. The only downside is that the narrator is completely incapable of doing foreign accents which is painful given that the protagonist is supposed to be French. His accent ranges between Jamaica and Newcastle, occassionally stopping for a brief visit to Scotland. In any other book it would be intolerable, but given the pulp fiction flavour it adds a "so bad it's good" touch.