The ADHD Advantage

What You Thought Was a Diagnosis May Be Your Greatest Strength
Narrated by: Walter Dixon
Length: 8 hrs and 46 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (300 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Here's why ADHD could be the key to your success.

For decades physicians delivered the diagnosis of ADHD to patients as bad news and warned them about a lifelong struggle of managing symptoms. But The ADHD Advantage explodes this outlook, showing that some of the most highly successful entrepreneurs, leaders, and entertainers have reached the pinnacle of success not in spite of their ADHD but because of it.

Although the ADHD stereotype is someone who can't sit still, in reality people with ADHD are endlessly curious, often adventurous, willing to take smart risks, and unusually resilient. They are creative, visionary, and entrepreneurial. Sharing the stories of highly successful people with ADHD, Dr. Archer offers a vitally important and inspiring new way to recognize ADHD traits in oneself or in one's loved ones, and then leverage them to great advantage - without drugs.

As someone who not only has ADHD himself but also has never used medication to treat it, Dr. Archer understands the condition from a unique standpoint. Armed with new science and research, he hopes to generate public interest and even debate with his positive message as he guides the millions of people with ADHD worldwide toward a whole new appreciation of their many strengths and full innate potential.

©2015 Dale Archer, MD (P)2015 Gildan Media LLC

What listeners say about The ADHD Advantage

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Very little meat and a lot of fluff.

Book was okay. There were many times I was exasperated with the repetitive stories. Book is not really a helpful guide; it's more of a feel good, you can do it book. It was nice that it pertrayed ADD/ADHD in a positive light. I am so glad the book is now over.

24 people found this helpful

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This guy doesn't understand ADHD – at all

I has a hunch this book would be a bad purchase.

The author, while well-meaning, seems to have no clue about ADHD and its implications.

The problem is that this book is REALLY written for the people who are in the over-diagnosed camp. People who don't have true ADD / ADHD, but think they do.

No, being very talkative and energetic does not make you ADHD. No, being easily bored does not make you ADD.

ADHD is a real life-challenge. It's defined by impairments and the degree to which the person is damaged or is damaging, his or her own life.

The reason book won't be very helpful to most people with ADHD, is simply because: you can't. If you could, you would have, already. Look up Russell Barkley on YouTube, see what he has to say on Point of Performance.

Another thing:
A times, it feels like the author could be a member of Scientology. He goes off any possible tangent he can, touting the wrongs of medication and "big pharma". But hey, in order to be fair, there's a chapter devoted to ADHD medications. My issue with it? It's the most superfluously useless chapter ever written about ADHD meds. It lists every countless generic and brand name med after the other, not describing the individual differences or effects, but only listing its possible side-effects. Huh??

The most useful book on ADHD I've found, is Russell Barkley's Taking Charge of ADHD. It's not available as an audiobook though, which I wish it was. Then I'd listen to it regularly. Russell Barkley actually understands ADHD, and offers up-to-date advice, going far past the typical stuff found in most ADHD books.

Another great book on ADHD, though more literary than practical, is Gabor Mate's Scattered. It just came out as audiobook, which I have hope it would for years now. No one has written about ADHD as Gabor has. None.

112 people found this helpful

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Where's the hope? Really hopeless

This might be OK for doctors or therapists, but for an adult with ADHD this book is filled with criticism for drugs, critical of any kind of test or way of diagnosing this real disorder. He seems to dismiss ADHD as a myth and attributes it to a whole laundry list of things it "might" be. Very disappointed. He slams the drug companies but offers nothing, and for those of us adults who have this, excuse the 19th century term, "affliction" it is useless.

Again, if I were a doctor this might be insightful, but as a patient, I'm glad he's not my doctor.

I would like a refund.

19 people found this helpful

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Life changing book.

This is a must read for anyone who has children with ADHD or thinks that they themselves may have it.
Opened up my eyes to life choices and occupations throughout my life and gave me a new level of comfort with who I am through a new understanding of why I behave the way I do.
Thank you for writing it!

4 people found this helpful

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Nearly Complete

Insightful and helpful in portraying ADHD as a gift that has helped mankind throughout the ages.... I would have liked to hear a bit more about Inattentive ADHD, which is a bit different and requires different strategies to harness.

4 people found this helpful

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Squirrel!

insightful and enlightening. I found myself wondering who wrote this book about me, or so it seemed. Might be a good listen for parents of ADHDers as well.

4 people found this helpful

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Great for morale, lacking in treatment

I liked the book, and framing ADHD as a strength certainly helps one feel better about having the diagnosis, but I think there needs to be a little more of a balanced perspective. This book presents ADHD as being totally a good thing, which odds great for morale, but I wanted to hear a little bit more about the areas that would give me trouble and why I would have a hard time in them, and what I could do to make things easier on myself. But if you just need a way to reframe your situation (and many people do), this book is great!

4 people found this helpful

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Cognitive bias throughout this book

I have twin Sons (12) who have struggled deeply in school every year. They’ve been diagnosed with ADHD by at least 4 different doctors, and 2 school psychologists. I wanted to believe this book’s points, but I couldn’t get past how focused it was on the idea that ADHD is some superhuman straight which the rest of the population just doesn’t understand. I do believe our schools are outdated, and are not properly nurturing the intelligence such kids have. However, the idea that ADHD is only bad because of school’s/society’s inability to see its genius seems short-sighted. There exists legitimate cases of kids and people who lack focus and executive functioning skills to the point it causes social alienation, horrible self-esteem, and a clear feeling for the child of not fitting in because of an inability to skillfully adapt to their environments. There exists legitimate cases where children’s lives have a net improvement as a result of medication. Perhaps not perpetually, but at least to bridge the gap (training wheels) until they can develop habits and abilities to control their impulses on their own.

3 people found this helpful

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Don't make it worse than it is, see it as it is.

I truly like to keep positive and approach ADHD with a strength based treatment and mindset. I wouldn't recommend it as a first book to read on the subject.
I don't my opinion to keep someone from reading this book, however it really bashes many forms of tried and true treatment and strategies. Not sure where some of the statistics came from. Best if you read as many books as you can. Best advice I ever received on ADHD is from Dr Ned Hallowell..... "No one person has all the answers."


6 people found this helpful

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amazing

This really related with me gives me hope and motivation, I'm 34 less than a year diagnosed. been walking down a lost raid find my way home and after this book I have more tools to get closer to where I wanna be thank you

2 people found this helpful