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Publisher's Summary

From the millions-strong audiences of Oprah and The Secret to the mass-media ministries of evangelical figures like Joel Osteen and T. D. Jakes, to the motivational bestsellers and New Age seminars to the twelve-step programs and support groups of the recovery movement and to the rise of positive psychology and stress-reduction therapies, this idea - to think positively - is metaphysics morphed into mass belief. This is the biography of that belief.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2014 Mitch Horowitz (P)2014 Random House Audio

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Outstanding Popular History of New Thought!

If you could sum up One Simple Idea in three words, what would they be?

"AS one thinks..."

What did you like best about this story?

The objective and insightful tone set by author/narrator Mitch Horowitz.

Which scene was your favorite?

Boston's role as America's New Thought center at the last turn of the century.

If you could give One Simple Idea a new subtitle, what would it be?

The Science of American Optimism.

Any additional comments?

It's curious that so many of the Non-American figures in the story--especially Sweden's Swedenborg and Britain's Troward--were unable to spark similar popular movements abroad. Coue' in France had the most "American" mass following in his nation. <br/><br/>P.S.Listeners should stick around for the postscript interview with Horowitz--he shares some compelling insights into the mysterious R.H. "It Works!" Jarrett.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful