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Everybody Lies Audiobook

Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are

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Publisher's Summary

Blending the informed analysis of The Signal and the Noise with the instructive iconoclasm of Think Like a Freak, a fascinating, illuminating, and witty look at what the vast amounts of information now instantly available to us reveal about ourselves and our world - provided we ask the right questions.

By the end of an average day in the early 21st century, human beings searching the Internet will amass eight trillion gigabytes of data. This staggering amount of information - unprecedented in history - can tell us a great deal about who we are - the fears, desires, and behaviors that drive us and the conscious and unconscious decisions we make. From the profound to the mundane, we can gain astonishing knowledge about the human psyche that less than 20 years ago seemed unfathomable.

Everybody Lies offers fascinating, surprising, and sometimes laugh-out-loud insights into everything from economics to ethics to sports to race to sex, gender, and more, all drawn from the world of big data. What percentage of white voters didn't vote for Barack Obama because he's black? Does where you go to school effect how successful you are in life? Do parents secretly favor boy children over girls? Do violent films affect the crime rate? Can you beat the stock market? How regularly do we lie about our sex lives, and who's more self-conscious about sex, men or women?

Investigating these questions and a host of others, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz offers revelations that can help us understand ourselves and our lives better. Drawing on studies and experiments on how we really live and think, he demonstrates in fascinating and often funny ways the extent to which all the world is indeed a lab. With conclusions ranging from strange-but-true to thought-provoking to disturbing, he explores the power of this digital truth serum and its deeper potential - revealing biases deeply embedded within us, information we can use to change our culture, and the questions we're afraid to ask that might be essential to our health - both emotional and physical. All of us are touched by big data every day, and its influence is multiplying. Everybody Lies challenges us to think differently about how we see it and the world.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2017 Seth Stephens-Davidowitz (P)2017 HarperCollins Publishers

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.6 (110 )
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  •  
    charity Euless, TX, United States 05-27-17
    charity Euless, TX, United States 05-27-17 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "With big data, social research becomes science"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Since less than 7% of people actually finish a magnus opus by an economist, most of you will miss the joke in the last line of this book.

    Google Trends data, and many other large data sets are able to conclusively prove how we as a population behave. Seth walked thru fascinating research into sex, racism, and class.

    I know that this book will influence the research that I do. This will influence the questions I am willing to ask, and the data sets I will go to for answers. The social sciences have moved into the realm of real data.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    timmon 05-26-17
    timmon 05-26-17 Member Since 2016
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    "good and insightful"

    good and insightful. i highly recommend this book. it offers a keen look at big data and it's potential uses.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    adi aharon 05-26-17
    adi aharon 05-26-17 Member Since 2017
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    "An honest, engaging, humorous, and relevant look at data"

    This was a great listen. It's a reflective and educational look at the data we create and how it can be analyzed. Seth Stephens-Davidowitz captures the hidden reality of our collective digital lives and cleverly informs readers of the importance and impact big data can have. The concepts covered are invaluable when attempting to fully understand the impacts of our connected world. Davidowitz draws in readers with (presumably true) personal anecdotes, voyeuristic search results, and insight that gets readers thinking. Highly recommended.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Miles 05-23-17
    Miles 05-23-17 Member Since 2016
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    "A look in the mirror"

    an interesting glimpse in the mirror modern humanity holds and should not look away from.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mat DeWater 05-22-17
    Mat DeWater 05-22-17 Member Since 2016
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    "A fantastic look at today's society"

    Using modern technology Stephens-Davidowitz has been able to answer questions in a way never before possible. This book highlights the new research that is only possible using modern computing and large datasets. From what makes a good race horse to how many Americans look up racist jokes - this is a sometimes entertaining, sometimes angering but always interesting look at the power of big data.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    William Ratcliff 05-22-17 Member Since 2011
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    "Great book and btw I did finish it!"

    It's has a great conclusion! I can't write a full review b/c I'd probably be lying about it anyway...

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    John Anderson 05-21-17
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    "Good book"

    Excellent narration (with a few missed pronunciations a Cleveland native will pick up on - Akron, Thome). I enjoyed this book but I am basically trusting the author's statistical ability. At times I thought certain claims were a bit bold. Still even if a few things don't end up holding true it was thought provoking.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    NMwritergal 05-20-17
    NMwritergal 05-20-17
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    "Interesting big data topics covered in this book"

    This book reminded me of Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One’s Looking), which I also really liked, though Everybody Lies covers some serious topics (such as racism and what the data showed about Trump). It also covers lighter subjects like baseball.

    One caveat for the…uh…conservative, the author scrapes the data from Pornhub so there’s some rather interesting data on that subject and, gasp, “bad” language.

    I really enjoyed this book. The author isn’t going to win any awards for his prose, but that doesn’t matter. The writing was adequate (author does have a sense of humor—bonus); it was easy and fun to listen to, and quite enlightening.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    samgbadebo 05-18-17
    samgbadebo 05-18-17
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    "Made me reconsider what I truly know about myself."

    It's so easy to assume the best about who you think you are. When you can look at years of your own search history of what you regularly inquire about. It can be very sobering the difference between what you think you focus on and what you have truly been focusing on. This books gets into the reality of what is really going on our minds from 'google search' which has become the entity that we are most honest with and tell our most private thoughts and secrets to.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kris M. 05-17-17
    Kris M. 05-17-17 Member Since 2014
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    "Very Telling"

    A very informative book but it was a bit hard to listen to at times. It felt robotic.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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