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Everybody Lies Audiobook

Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are

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Publisher's Summary

Blending the informed analysis of The Signal and the Noise with the instructive iconoclasm of Think Like a Freak, a fascinating, illuminating, and witty look at what the vast amounts of information now instantly available to us reveal about ourselves and our world - provided we ask the right questions.

By the end of an average day in the early 21st century, human beings searching the Internet will amass eight trillion gigabytes of data. This staggering amount of information - unprecedented in history - can tell us a great deal about who we are - the fears, desires, and behaviors that drive us and the conscious and unconscious decisions we make. From the profound to the mundane, we can gain astonishing knowledge about the human psyche that less than 20 years ago seemed unfathomable.

Everybody Lies offers fascinating, surprising, and sometimes laugh-out-loud insights into everything from economics to ethics to sports to race to sex, gender, and more, all drawn from the world of big data. What percentage of white voters didn't vote for Barack Obama because he's black? Does where you go to school effect how successful you are in life? Do parents secretly favor boy children over girls? Do violent films affect the crime rate? Can you beat the stock market? How regularly do we lie about our sex lives, and who's more self-conscious about sex, men or women?

Investigating these questions and a host of others, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz offers revelations that can help us understand ourselves and our lives better. Drawing on studies and experiments on how we really live and think, he demonstrates in fascinating and often funny ways the extent to which all the world is indeed a lab. With conclusions ranging from strange-but-true to thought-provoking to disturbing, he explores the power of this digital truth serum and its deeper potential - revealing biases deeply embedded within us, information we can use to change our culture, and the questions we're afraid to ask that might be essential to our health - both emotional and physical. All of us are touched by big data every day, and its influence is multiplying. Everybody Lies challenges us to think differently about how we see it and the world.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2017 Seth Stephens-Davidowitz (P)2017 HarperCollins Publishers

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.5 (1049 )
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  •  
    Miroslav 06-22-17
    Miroslav 06-22-17 Member Since 2016
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    "Interesting but not flawless"

    Interesting book, easy to listen to. The problem is the author likes to jump to conclusions he can't substantiate. And he even knows it, as in some cases he explains how the data is not enough. And he still does it anyway.

    11 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David 06-22-17
    David 06-22-17 Member Since 2011

    David

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    "Could have been shorter for information contained"

    I thought the reader possibly changed the author's meaning with tonality. The author​ seems full of himself, but there's good information there and it's a quick, fun, read.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joe C. 05-30-17
    Joe C. 05-30-17 Member Since 2017
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    "Good, but not Freakanomics great"

    I very much enjoyed this audiobook, but I was a little disappointed because he did not live up to the personal expectation I had after having heard the author in a handful of podcasts. I was under the impression the book was going to be filled with an endless amount of conclusions drawn from Big Data. instead, the audiobook is predominantly a polemic in favor of the use of big data sprinkled with little bits of information.

    Still, I very much enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone I know.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    JPyron 06-19-17
    JPyron 06-19-17 Member Since 2016
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    "Everybody lies..."

    ...the proof is in the pudding. A fun insight into the depths of human behavior and psychology. Easy to digest, the author makes clear points that invoke thought. Concisely delivered and clear to understand - I highly recommend this audiobook. Or, am I lying to look good on the review...? better yet, I can bet (according the this book) most people won't get this far in the review, for what I say to make a difference. ;)

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Andrew 06-18-17
    Andrew 06-18-17 Member Since 2013
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    "this is a book everyone must read"

    loved it, the book kept me interested the entire way. definitely worth a listen :)

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Rod Olson Beverly Hills, CA 06-08-17
    Rod Olson Beverly Hills, CA 06-08-17 Member Since 2017
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    "Highly recommend. Great book... fizzled a bit at the end."

    For most of the book the big data and anecdotes were engaging... fascinating. When the author, Seth, uses less story to explain the data my mind went somewhere else. That should NOT be a reason not to purchase. I will listen to the book again, that's for sure (I wonder if I am lying?). 😜

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    mark o reilly 06-07-17
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    "Exciting new insights"

    Great and interesting content. I read a lot of pop science and non fiction and sometimes it's hard to be surprised by anything as you come across a lot of similar themes. This book felt like a lot of genuinely new information.

    It's very engaging and though the topics I found slightly less interesting as the book went on its definitely worth a listen.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Narada Princeton, NJ, USA 06-25-17
    Narada Princeton, NJ, USA 06-25-17 Member Since 2014

    the wondering jew

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    "Interesting but annoying"

    The book has a lot of interesting material, and the author succeeds in showing some of the ways in which the data revolution is changing we do social science. I am working with data and economic applications, and I certainly learned a lot, so on those grounds, I would recommend the book.

    On the other hand, the author is an extremely annoying nudnick, and I am not at all surprised he has trouble finding a mate (as he keeps mentioning), He has also drunk deeply of the KoolAde of leftiness, and for those of us not in Jonestown this really grates.The continuing prattling on about Islamophobia is particularly galling to me personally, but there is plenty more where that came from.

    His claim that data cannot beat the market is absurd on the surface of it - I know many people who make a very nice living doing just that (beating the market with data).

    The structure of the book is basically non-existent.

    Finally, a language Nazi peeve - the author keeps using the word UTILIZE instead of the superior USE.

    7 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Qu 05-30-17
    Qu 05-30-17 Member Since 2013
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    "Very intriguing"

    The one magical thing about this book is that whenever I start listening, I could not stop. I wonder if the author has put it under some sort of AB testing (I'm saying this to prove that at least I've got through a significant portion of the book). As an academic who has experience with large datasets, I find that the biggest virtue of this book is that it brings stimulation to my brain. I find my brain racing fast to come up with projects that can be done using the datasets mentioned in the book. Although many of the questions I came up with has nothing to do with the field I'm in, I still find the experience very enjoyable and hopefully will eventually fruitful. As to some of the conclusions of the numerous studies mentioned in the book, I will have to look at the actual papers to form my own opinion on whether I agree with them, but that does not stop me from enjoying the book. Plus, I wish people in academia don't read the conclusion sections of papers, like readers don't get to the final chapter of books by economists, as I find it particularly hard to write the conclusion section of my papers. Yet prior experience tells me (and this I don't need big data to draw the conclusion) that people often only read the introduction and the conclusion of academic papers. And I'm only saying this to prove that I did finish the book.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    adi aharon 05-26-17
    adi aharon 05-26-17 Member Since 2017
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    "An honest, engaging, humorous, and relevant look at data"

    This was a great listen. It's a reflective and educational look at the data we create and how it can be analyzed. Seth Stephens-Davidowitz captures the hidden reality of our collective digital lives and cleverly informs readers of the importance and impact big data can have. The concepts covered are invaluable when attempting to fully understand the impacts of our connected world. Davidowitz draws in readers with (presumably true) personal anecdotes, voyeuristic search results, and insight that gets readers thinking. Highly recommended.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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