Average is Over

Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation
Narrated by: Andrew Garman
Length: 8 hrs and 42 mins
Categories: Money & Finance, Economics
4 out of 5 stars (326 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

The widening gap between rich and poor means dealing with one big, uncomfortable truth: If you're not at the top, you're at the bottom.

The global labor market is changing radically thanks to growth at the high end and the low. About three quarters of the jobs created in the United States since the great recession pay only a bit more than minimum wage. Still, the United States has more millionaires and billionaires than any country ever, and we continue to mint them.

In this eye-opening audiobook, renowned economist and best-selling author Tyler Cowen explains that phenomenon: High earners are taking ever more advantage of machine intelligence in data analysis and achieving ever-better results. Meanwhile, low earners, who haven't committed to learning or to making the most of new technologies, have poorer prospects. Nearly every business sector relies less and less on manual labor, and this fact is forever changing the world of work and wages. A steady, secure life somewhere in the middle is over.

With The Great Stagnation, Cowen explained why median wages stagnated over the last four decades; in Average is Over he reveals the essential nature of the new economy, identifies the best path forward for workers and entrepreneurs, and provides listeners with actionable advice to make the most of the new economic landscape. It is a challenging and sober must-listen - but ultimately exciting and good news. In debates about our nation's economic future, it will be impossible to ignore.

©2013 Tyler Cowen (P)2013 Recorded Books
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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Five Years Later Predictions Holding<br />

Even after five years and with some economic realities somewhat different it's interesting to hear how close we are to the road he predicts..

1 person found this helpful

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Computers Will Take Jobs, Including Book Narrators

Where does Average is Over rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

I like Tyler Cowen's message, but the performance of this was not great. The narrator sounded rather bland and flat.

What did you like best about this story?

This non-fiction book tells a compelling tale of technological unemployment. Tyler Cowen is a bit of a fear-monger, but he's probably at least a little bit right.

1 person found this helpful

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Excellent!!!

One my best listens of the last year. Still relevant in 2020. This one is worthwhile, and well explained.

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Insightful bits about artifical intelligence

The book starts and ends strong. Great points about AI, wealth inequality, and careers. The politics aren't ones I agree with necessarily and become more apparent at the very end of the book, but overall I do not find obnoxious. The only real criticism of this book is the extreme focus on chess. I feel like this is two books, one about future economic prediction, and the other just literally about chess trivia, chess AI, and chess champions. The chess parts are interesting, but they go on for far too long.

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Amazing foresight, Narration kind of boring.

great information, but the narration could have been a bit more dynamic with more enthusiasm.

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Compelling

Very compelling and interesting regarding technologically savvy labor demand and the future of the economy. Great discussion of economic inequality changes and some things we will benefit from in the future despite increased inequality.

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Fantastic wake up call

Every young person should read this as they begin their career! I found it to be thought provoking and made me look at things in multiple ways.

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poorly researched, typical conservative rant

if you were looking for any we'll reachered book talking about how technology will change job market and what it will take to win in future then you will have hard time mining that information from this book. unfortunately, this book is the same old same old rant from a conservative and he managed to blame it all on Obama.

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great book

well narrated. good ideas, predictions. the first 3 and last 2 chapters are the best. the chess bit is ok...but parts drag on near the end of the book

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Interesting, but where is the spiritual nature of man in this book?

Man is intuitive and resourceful. The underclass may have more connection to nature and respect for community. Machines are discussed as, by nature, dehumanizing, but in some ways we are learning to create, play and express more freely through them. The future could definitely be a time of heaven on earth.