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Publisher's Summary

Garry Kasparov gives his first public account of his landmark 1997 chess match with the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue and explains why, 20 years later, he's become convinced that artificial intelligence is good for humans.

In May 1997 the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. It was a watershed moment in the history of technology: machine intelligence had arrived at the point where it could best human intellect.

It wasn't a coincidence that Kasparov became the symbol of man's fight against the machines. Chess has long been the fulcrum in the development of machine intelligence; the hoax automaton 'The Turk' in the 18th century and Alan Turing's first chess program in 1952 were two early examples of the quest for machines to think like humans - a talent we measured by their ability to beat their creators at chess. As the preeminent chessmaster of the '80s and '90s, it was Kasparov's blessing and his curse to play against each generation's strongest computer champions, contributing to their development and advancing the field.

Like all passionate competitors, Kasparov has taken his defeat and learned from it. He has devoted much energy to devising ways in which humans can partner with machines in order to produce results better than either can achieve alone. During the 20 years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. Ultimately, he's become convinced that by embracing the competition between human and machine intelligence, we can spend less time worrying about being replaced and more thinking of new challenges to conquer.

In this breakthrough book, Kasparov tells his side of the story of Deep Blue for the first time - what it was like to strategize against an implacable, untiring opponent, the mistakes he made and the reasons the odds were against him. But more than that, he tells his story of AI more generally and how he's evolved to embrace it, taking part in an urgent debate with philosophers worried about human values, programmers creating self-learning neural networks and engineers of cutting-edge robotics.

©2017 Garry Kasparov (P)2017 Hachette Audio

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  • C4NH4M
  • 11-06-17

Masterpiece

this was an interesting listen as it comes first hand from someone who has had a lot of experience with A.I. over several decades. a great story :)

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  • ML Cave
  • 10-02-17

Nothing to do with AI, boring historical account of deep blue games

Nothing to do with AI, boring historical account of deep blue games. Why would anyone be interested in this?

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Simon Moores
  • 08-16-17

an excellent book

I was lucky enough to meet Gary in 2001 and the book finally articulates his thoughts on the Deep Blue match in a way which makes perfect sense. The narration is a little too fast and that makes it difficult to ponder some of the detail and in particular chess positions

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 07-08-17

Well narrated account of computers vs humans in chess, but promises more than it delivers

Well narrated account of computers vs humans in chess, but promises more than it delivers

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 06-29-17

Frank, honest and insightful

Deep Blue's victory over world chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1997 is well known as a major milestone in Artificial Intelligence. I was interested but not sure what to expect from this book. It turned out to be not only a well written and fascinating historical account but also an insightful and accessible review of the more recent development of AI and what it means for humans. There is no shortage of hype written about this subject but Garry Kasparov's book is a real contribution and well worth listening to. The glimpse in to the world of professional chess was no less interesting.