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Publisher's Summary

In John Scalzi's re-imagining of H. Beam Piper's 1962 sci-fi classic Little Fuzzy, written with the full cooperation of the Piper Estate, Jack Holloway works alone for reasons he doesn't care to talk about. On the distant planet Zarathustra, Jack is content as an independent contractor for ZaraCorp, prospecting and surveying at his own pace. As for his past, that's not up for discussion.

Then, in the wake of an accidental cliff collapse, Jack discovers a seam of unimaginably valuable jewels, to which he manages to lay legal claim just as ZaraCorp is cancelling their contract with him for his part in causing the collapse. Briefly in the catbird seat, legally speaking, Jack pressures ZaraCorp into recognizing his claim, and cuts them in as partners to help extract the wealth.

But there's another wrinkle to ZaraCorp's relationship with the planet Zarathustra. Their entire legal right to exploit the verdant Earth-like planet, the basis of the wealth they derive from extracting its resources, is based on being able to certify to the authorities on Earth that Zarathustra is home to no sentient species. Then a small furry biped - trusting, appealing, and ridiculously cute - shows up at Jack's outback home. Followed by its family. As it dawns on Jack that despite their stature, these are people, he begins to suspect that ZaraCorp's claim to a planet's worth of wealth is very flimsy indeed and that ZaraCorp may stop at nothing to eliminate the fuzzys before their existence becomes more widely known.

©2011 John Scalzi (P)2011 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

  • Audie Award Winner, Science Fiction, 2012
“[Scalzi’s] style and skill make it a highly entertaining read. It succeeds both as a new novel from a talented writer and as a tribute and gateway to Piper’s work.” (Wired)
"It’s a wonderful book.... [T]he way that Scalzi puts that wonderful novel of Piper’s into a fresher context is cynically lovely.... Year’s best? Yeah, one of them." (The San Diego Union-Tribune)
“A perfectly executed plot clicks its way to a stunning courtroom showdown in a cathartic finish that will thrill Fuzzy fans old and new.” (Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
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Performance

  • 4.7 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
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  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

So good

What did you love best about Fuzzy Nation?

Everything

What was one of the most memorable moments of Fuzzy Nation?

When papa spoke for the first time

Have you listened to any of Wil Wheaton and John Scalzi (Introduction) ’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

As usual Wheaton and Scalzi blow this story out of the park. I have read almost everything by Scalzi, and Wheaton is one of my favorite narrators.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I did listen to it in one sitting.

Any additional comments?

There were a few major plot devices that were laughably predictable, but they were usually resolved quickly without too much meandering. My favorite parts were the repeated and thorough ass kickings halloway dished out.<br/><br/>If this book was much longer than 7 hrs I would say it was far too long, and any shorter and it would be rushed. The story is simple and paced beautifully as it is. I was grinning madly toward the end of the book. It was very satisfying.<br/><br/>PS. Someone mentioned the overuse of "he said" and "she said" speech tags. I agree. You can use fewer of those phrases during dialog, and I noticed the same thing in Redshirts. You can ignore it for the most part, but during some longer dialogs even Will Wheaton can accidentally add the inflections of the sentence into the "he said", "she said", or "so and so said" dialog tags when they occur during every single line.

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It's that good!

I have never read Scalzi before but boy am I glad I did! From the very first page, I felt like I could connect with the main character. Funny, flawed, arrogant but charming, and somehow making trouble for himself...I had an emotional connection to the characters without this being an in-depth work of fiction. The reviews are true, you'll laugh! But that is only one small element to the story. He somehow creates a believable story on an alien planet that has recently discovered a new species. It is as much a story about corporate greed as it is about fury creatures.

If you liked Will Wheaton in Ready Player One this is a must read!! Don't over think it. Just use the credit...you won't regret it!

I just purchased Old Mans War as I am now a Scalzi fan!

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excellent

per usual Will's narration is killer. this was totally worth a read. very enjoyable !

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Powerful emotive writing and performance narrative

Powerful and emotive writing and performance. Couldn't put it down. A most enjoyable read, really.

  • Overall
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Fuzzy Wuzzy was an Alien

What made the experience of listening to Fuzzy Nation the most enjoyable?

Wil Wheaton really made this enjoyable. John's a great writer but Wil really brought the characters to life. His interpretation of the characters felt spot on.

Who was your favorite character and why?

The dog because it was trained to detonate dynamite. :) Also, the Xenolinguist. I know they are super minor characters, but I loved the Xenoliguist's passion once he finds out there is actually something to do on the planet.

Have you listened to any of Wil Wheaton and John Scalzi (Introduction) ’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No, but I imagine they are just as good.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes! It's very intriguing. Story really builds momentum and you get that, "What's gonna happen next?" feeling after each chapter.

Any additional comments?

If you are a fan of Law Drama's or court case books, then you'll love this one.

  • Overall

I wish they would make this into a movie!

The narrator reminded me a little of George Clooney and would seem a fitting actor for the major character in the story. This was a really nice update of an old book. Enjoyed it!

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You're not going to want to put it down.

This was the first John Scalzi book that I've ever listen to and I was not disappointed. I've listened to it straight through three times now.

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A beautiful homage

A beautiful homage to H. Beam Piper and the novel that inspired this one, "Little Fuzzies".

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  • Hunter
  • WILLIS, TEXAS, United States
  • 07-31-15

Great book!

I really liked how the characters were portrayed and how the differences and conflicts between them drove the story. The Fuzzies and Carl were awesome!
It is also interesting to compare this book with the original by H Beam Piper; to see how societies' awareness of environmental impact has changed over the last 50 or so years. Jack Holloway is a very interesting and complex character.

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wow so good

was such a good story I can't believe it
ill listen to any thing narrated by Will Wheaton
John Scalzi will go down in history as one of our greatest writers of this era