Regular price: $19.95

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

In John Scalzi's re-imagining of H. Beam Piper's 1962 sci-fi classic Little Fuzzy, written with the full cooperation of the Piper Estate, Jack Holloway works alone for reasons he doesn't care to talk about. On the distant planet Zarathustra, Jack is content as an independent contractor for ZaraCorp, prospecting and surveying at his own pace. As for his past, that's not up for discussion.

Then, in the wake of an accidental cliff collapse, Jack discovers a seam of unimaginably valuable jewels, to which he manages to lay legal claim just as ZaraCorp is cancelling their contract with him for his part in causing the collapse. Briefly in the catbird seat, legally speaking, Jack pressures ZaraCorp into recognizing his claim, and cuts them in as partners to help extract the wealth.

But there's another wrinkle to ZaraCorp's relationship with the planet Zarathustra. Their entire legal right to exploit the verdant Earth-like planet, the basis of the wealth they derive from extracting its resources, is based on being able to certify to the authorities on Earth that Zarathustra is home to no sentient species. Then a small furry biped - trusting, appealing, and ridiculously cute - shows up at Jack's outback home. Followed by its family. As it dawns on Jack that despite their stature, these are people, he begins to suspect that ZaraCorp's claim to a planet's worth of wealth is very flimsy indeed and that ZaraCorp may stop at nothing to eliminate the fuzzys before their existence becomes more widely known.

©2011 John Scalzi (P)2011 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

  • Audie Award Winner, Science Fiction, 2012
“[Scalzi’s] style and skill make it a highly entertaining read. It succeeds both as a new novel from a talented writer and as a tribute and gateway to Piper’s work.” (Wired)
"It’s a wonderful book.... [T]he way that Scalzi puts that wonderful novel of Piper’s into a fresher context is cynically lovely.... Year’s best? Yeah, one of them." (The San Diego Union-Tribune)
“A perfectly executed plot clicks its way to a stunning courtroom showdown in a cathartic finish that will thrill Fuzzy fans old and new.” (Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    5,349
  • 4 Stars
    2,555
  • 3 Stars
    586
  • 2 Stars
    81
  • 1 Stars
    51

Performance

  • 4.7 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    5,695
  • 4 Stars
    1,680
  • 3 Stars
    354
  • 2 Stars
    49
  • 1 Stars
    39

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    4,799
  • 4 Stars
    2,325
  • 3 Stars
    578
  • 2 Stars
    77
  • 1 Stars
    45
Sort by:
  • Overall

Loved it!

I really loved John Scalzi's version of Fuzzy Nation. He did a great job and it was enjoyable to hear the original afterwards.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Long live the Fuzzies

Loved it ! ( and I'm not a fan of sci-fi). Who can resist the Fuzzies?! Plenty of action,but be prepared for a few tears, too. Wil Wheaton +John Scalzi = Excellence.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Jason
  • Herne Hill, Australia
  • 03-11-13

Very disappointed

What disappointed you about Fuzzy Nation?

The narration was rushed and the repetitive use of the attributives - he said...she said...he siad.....she said, was like having a splinter stuck in you hand and not able to get it out. I enjoyed the original text and narration so much more.

Has Fuzzy Nation turned you off from other books in this genre?

Between this title and a few other recent purchases, I have started to shy away from a long term love affair with science fiction. If others hadn't rated it so high I may not have been disappointed quite so much.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Wil Wheaton and John Scalzi (Introduction) ?

I am not a fan of Wil Weaton as a narrator

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Fuzzy Nation?

I would recommend that this novel was not re-released. The original was definitely dated but the rewrite did not warrant the effort.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A Lovely Telling

I had never read the original novel (which is included in part two of this purchase) so had nothing on which to base my expectations. I thought it was good fun and enjoyed the flawed hero, the sense of humor of the author, and the happy ending. I found myself smiling throughout and engaged from beginning to end. I highly recommend Fuzzy Nation.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

The legalese is convincing.

This was an engaging remake of the old story.

There were some changes to make Jack Holloway work better with Scalzi's writing style. Scalzi still uses 'he/she/they said' to express every change in dialogue, which can get annoying, if you zero in on it. I didn't really notice it that often, and it wasn't as obvious as in his Old Man's War series.

Throughout the book Scalzi is careful to use Holloway's actions and words to describe his character. You aren't force fed his every thought, which is both a huge relief, but since Holloway is so manipulatively devious, it leaves enough mystery to unfolding events to create doubts on how the space opera plays out.

The little Davids trying to stick it to the industrial corporate Goliath is a delight, and one that will be easy for a lot of today's readers to empathize with.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Barbara
  • Brentwood, TN, United States
  • 01-21-13

Delightful, engrossing two-for-one read

I was not familiar with the original "Little Fuzzy" story that inspired the new Fuzzy Nation, nor with author John Scalzi. What a happy experience it has been to discover not just one, but two books that I enjoy and another author to explore further.

While the initial premise and the main character's name are the same, the two stories are different and each is enjoyable in its own way. Once I finished Fuzzy Nation, I was a little concerned that Little Fuzzy might not be as interesting because it was written back in the 60's. Even though the characters in Little Fuzzy had communication devices with image screens, they were still taking movies and developing film, which gave me a chuckle. No worries; it was more innocent and idealistic but still holds your interest all the way through.

The Fuzzies are fascinating little creatures that force humans to search for a definition of what it means to be sapient. Are they just cute, intelligent animals or are they people who should remain free to evolve and determine their own future? Each book ends with a glimpse into a possible future for how the Fuzzies and humans will adapt to living on the same planet. I hope Scalzi will write a sequel to Fuzzy Nation one day and show us what life is like there a few decades or centuries later.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • John
  • Sedona, AZ, United States
  • 01-13-13

Skip Part 1;Listen to Part 2 (Little Fuzzy)

This audio recording is actually two novels. Part 2 is the original SF novel written by H. Beam Piper(written in 1962) and is a worthwhile piece of science fiction with excellent narration of the Holloway character. The attempt by John Scalzi to produce a followup novel on the characters of the original is a sad failure. About one-half the novel is really dialogue about legal wranglings and wise-cracking from John Holloway with his last name perhaps being a reflection of his character. It has the negative combination of predictability of outcome, improbability of action, and sentimentality.
I wonder if many of the postive reviews may have been for the clever and prescient novel by Piper.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

H. Beam Piper would find this interesting

What made the experience of listening to Fuzzy Nation the most enjoyable?

It was a faithful adaptation of H. Beam Pipers "Little Fuzzy". In the forward, Scalzi talks about how he was trying to re-write Little fuzzy with more modern sensibilities. He succeeded. And in many ways, I expect this version to stand the test of time as well as the original. Wil Wheaton is a fantastic narrator.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Fuzzy Nation?

The dog. Without ruining anything, the dog.

What about Wil Wheaton and John Scalzi (Introduction) ’s performance did you like?

He (Wil Wheaton) brought life into the characters, even to the point that there was no doubt who was speaking as who. His voice as the narrator was fantastic, and that of the main character was good enough to make you sympathise with him.

Any additional comments?

Well done John Scalzi. I am not a fan of most work put out in a universe from a dead creator, (Sorry Brandon), but this was done well. It does not attempt to be the original story, but reuses so many of the same elements is such a different way that still pays tribute. I would recommend this to anyone who wanted an introduction to Scalzi and his work.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • A
  • 09-03-12

Much to think about

I suppose that we will attempt to dominate extra-planetary life much as the Europeans conquered the "New World." What a depressing thought. We don't stray from our DNA, do we?

Fuzzy Nation is sci-fi right up my alley. I am not a devotee of the genre; I read it every now and then when something strikes my fancy and really prefer it to be rather tame on the graphic violence (because it is really hard to simply skim over those paragraphs when you listen on audio). So, what I have read so far by Scalzi has been perfect.

Thank you, John for choosing to update a well told tale and thank you Wil for the excellent narration.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Andrea
  • Linz, Austria
  • 08-05-12

entertaining and recommendable

Good plot twists, fast-paced and lovable alien-creatures. Highly entertaining book. Likewise Scalzi could have written a thriller about economy, exploitation and environment. Yet he focused on entertainment which makes the book an easy read but with very real truths behind the fictional story.
The narration itself is good, however, be prepared that the story is truly read to you, therefore you hear many, many "he said" and "she said."
I didn't listen to the original by Piper. Maybe at another time but it makes no sense to me hearing the story - even in a variation - in immediate succession.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Rosemary White
  • 11-02-12

Caught by surprise.

I was unaware of H Beam Piper's book that inspired this delightful surprise read. I had no expectations and was caught from the first by its convoluted and almost sneaky charm. Little fuzzies are adorable (I want to meet one) but I have to say that John Scalzi has caught the humanesque essence of dogness without anthropomorphicism (is that a real word?? LOL) and I was immediately sucked in (no, dogs are not the primary focus of the story, Carl was the bait on the hook for me). I was also tangled in the surprise twists and turns in the plot which resolved very satisfactorily. I was sorry to reach the end. A good deal of the pleasure was enhanced by the narrator. Some narrators have such vocal ability that its almost like listening to a whole cast of actors, Will Wheaton managed this without without changing his voice much yet neverthless was able to create distinct and separate qualities to the individual characters in the story so there was no confusion as to who was "talking". I really enjoyed both the style of writing, the words constructing this story and the way it was told. Very highly recommended. I already look forward to hearing it again!

  • Overall
  • D Dolling
  • 10-27-12

Wonderful narration

A good book doesn't necessarily make a good audiobook. Fuzzy Nation however is perfect. Fantastic narration by Wil Wheaton. You can tell he has given a lot of thought beforehand but he's also one of those people who just has a pleasant voice you enjoy listening to. I found Fuzzy Nation fun, involving with plenty of hooks to keep me interested. As a bonus the original Little Fuzzy is thrown in which is the icing on the cake.

  • Overall
  • Chris
  • 05-21-12

An Excellent Reworking

I love John Scalzi; I'd waited a while for his latest work and I wasn't disappointed. Scalzi always tells a great story and is witty when doing so.

This is a massive complement from me but he reminds me of the great Douglas Adams. Please live a long and productive life Mr Scalzi.

  • Overall
  • Amazon Customer
  • 11-30-11

As delightful as the original

I remember being so busy reading the original Little Fuzzy that I missed a train. This was just as enjoyable.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful