• Love Wins

  • A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived
  • By: Rob Bell
  • Narrated by: Rob Bell
  • Length: 3 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Release date: 03-15-11
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperAudio
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars (1,274 ratings)

Regular price: $18.24

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Publisher's Summary

Millions of Christians have struggled with how to reconcile God's love and God's judgment: Has God created billions of people over thousands of years only to select a few to go to heaven and everyone else to suffer forever in hell? Is this acceptable to God? How is this "good news"?

Troubling questions, so troubling that many have lost their faith because of them. Others only whisper the questions to themselves, fearing or being taught that they might lose their faith and their church if they ask them out loud.

But what if these questions trouble us for good reason? What if the story of heaven and hell we have been taught is not, in fact, what the Bible teaches? What if what Jesus meant by heaven, hell, and salvation are very different from how we have come to understand them?

What if it is God who wants us to face these questions?

Author, pastor, and innovative teacher Rob Bell presents a deeply biblical vision for rediscovering a richer, grander, truer, and more spiritually satisfying way of understanding heaven, hell, God, Jesus, salvation, and repentance. The result is the discovery that the "good news" is much, much better than we ever imagined. Love wins.

©2011 Robert H. Bell, Jr. Trust (P)2011 HarperCollins Publishers

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

A book worth reading

Bell is a fantastic orator and does an amazing job narrative get his own work on Love Wins.

The book itself has been truly inspirational, and while it has also proved to be quite controversial, it's a book worth reading and talking about.

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Your Life Will Change

If you could sum up Love Wins in three words, what would they be?

Love always wins

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I did listen to this book in one sitting. One day. Actually, no, a few days in a row. On repeat. Still refer back to it. Brilliant.

Any additional comments?

If you're comfortable in your religion and haven't experienced enough religious abuse to wake you up thinking 'there's got to be something different' - buy this book and read it when youve reached that point. However, if you're already there and are teeming with more questions than answers about what's really God and what is conforming to just someone's preference and religious culture. Something's got to give. This book was written for me. Er.. for you. Read it. But be prepared to realize God doesnt fit the box we've created for him to dwell in culturally. This will make you walk outside to the dog run and let God off the leash. Be aware, though, this act will change your life.

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Love this book & message. Narration outstanding!

Would you consider the audio edition of Love Wins to be better than the print version?

Yes. Yes. Yes. Fast pasted and full of expression. Read by author.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Love Wins?

Rob Bell's message on Christianity is like a breath of fresh air. The insights about the culture and times behind various bible passages was enlightening and made so many unclear bible stories more understandable for me. I can't wait to read more!

Which scene was your favorite?

Preface grabbed my interest immediately and my attention was held throughout.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Easily.

Any additional comments?

Not sure what all the controversy is all about. I found nothing shocking in his message or interpretations. The title says it all.

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Accepting the Bible's Big Claims About Redemption

Any additional comments?

I am pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed "Love Wins". I've never been a Rob Bell fan, having started (but never finished) "Velvet Elvis" and "Sex God", but this book is worth picking up and wrestling with. For that reason — the value of wrestling with its topics — it will stand as one of the more important popular books of the decade. It isn't very deep. It isn't very broad. But it asks excellent questions and it has reached a large audience with those questions.

After having just read C.S. Lewis' "The Great Divorce" for the second time, I began Rob Bell's "Love Wins". The similarities are apparent. It's quite clear that Lewis' perspective on the subject of Hell has influenced Rob. I don't think that Bell's views of the Afterlife are identical to those of Lewis, but he's certainly not less orthodox in this area than Lewis.

One thing that struck me a little less than half-way through: "Love Wins" quotes from Scripture a lot — much more than the average Christian book, I would say. Significantly, Bell doesn't spend a lot of time trying to take verses that seem on the surface to contradict his points and show how they really don't contradict his points. Instead, he spends most of his time quoting Scripture in showing how frequently and in how strong language the Bible at least seems to indicate that eventually "all shall be well". This is significant because it's apparent that his purpose with this book is to get us to dialog about Heaven and Hell — about the tension between how we often view world history, in light of Christian belief, as a tragedy, though the Bible in many places rises to the highest superlatives of grandeur seeming to tell a different story. The Bible does say powerful things like:

• "As in Adam all die, so in Christ all shall be made alive." (1 Corinthians 15)

• "All the ends of the earth will remember and turn to the LORD, and all the families of the nations will bow down before him, for dominion belongs to the LORD and he rules over the nations. All the rich of the earth will feast and worship; all who go down to the dust will kneel before him — those who cannot keep themselves alive. Posterity will serve him; future generations will be told about the Lord." (Psalm 22)

• "Love is patient... it always protects... always hopes... Love never fails." (1 Corinthians 13)

• "Having made known unto us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure, which he hath purposed in himself, that in the dispensation of the fulness of times, he might gather together in one all things in Christ, both which are in heaven, and which are on earth, even in him." (Ephesians 1)

• "At the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father." (Philippians 2)

• "For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross." (Colossians 1)

• "But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels, for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honor; that he, by the grace of God, should taste death for every man." (Hebrews 2)

• "Behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people." (Luke 2)

• "For he must remain in heaven until the time for the final restoration of all things, as God promised long ago through his holy prophets." (Acts 3)

• "He will swallow up death in victory; and the Lord GOD will wipe away tears from off all faces." (Isaiah 25)

• "I will not contend forever, neither will I be always wroth; for the spirit should fail before men, and the souls which I have made." (Isaiah 57:16)

• "The LORD is merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and plenteous in mercy. He will not always chide: neither will he keep his anger for ever." (Psalm 103)

• "For I will not fight against you forever; I will not always be angry. If I were, all people would pass away — all the souls I have made."
"His mercy endureth forever." (Psalm 136)

Those verses sound pretty all-encompassing. And the list just goes on and on, in both Testaments. We need to talk about this. There are passages in the Bible that sound just as strongly certain of the ultimate reconciliation of all people as other passages do of the ultimate condemnation of some people. Scripture contains many forceful words on both 'sides'. Who are we to dismiss either emphasis out of hand? Who are we to baulk at such a serious issue? Not one drop of ink was spilled by the Bible's own authors to attenuate the clear strength of such phrases as "the final restoration of all things". Paul never corrects himself or bothers to lessen the force of his words, and James doesn't correct him either.

So, how should we take such a difficulty? Do we try to write it off, saying, as many have, "Well, 'all,' of course, doesn't really mean 'all.'"? No. Besides, the same kind of flippant response could be used against the word 'eternal' in passages which speak of 'eternal hell' -- and with surer linguistic support (we knew this about the word 'eternal' even in my diehard, hellfire fundamentalist seminary: we just didn't like to talk about it much). But I don't think it's the most helpful (or healthy) to approach the apparent paradox in this way at all.

What we should do: Accept that the Bible leaves many questions unresolved, and at least sometimes on purpose. Accept that the Bible forces us to trust God for the truth; it isn't here just to spoon-feed us. Paradoxes aren't contradictions. They are truths we don't know how to reconcile. And we little fools have to learn to be okay with that! If an Infinite Being exists, then there is an infinity of truth which must forever be unknowable to any particular finite being! That is, there will always, always, always be for us far more mysteries among the truth than certainties. We will always have gaps in our knowledge. Don't you think it's time we admitted it? Our certainty must reside precisely in a Person, not in a knowledge of facts -- or are we just another sort of Gnostic?

What the Bible tells us without question:
1) It's big trouble if we don't trust and obey God.
2) It's big salvation God has in store.

You want more detail than that? What for? I fear that we drive ourselves toward intellectual certainties in order to put off real obedience.

Trust Christ and obey Him, and suffering will turn at last to joy. That's it. Some way or other, however God does it, whenever God does it, whoever it includes, love wins. Goodness wins. God wins. Whatever that means, it is the best possible of all outcomes, because it is the outcome the perfect God will have orchestrated. If we trust Him, and it will be enough.

That, I think, is the point of "Love Wins".

But if we merely assume that what we have been told is true is indeed true, then we merely perpetuate the very root problem that got us to the point where God allowed (at least) or encouraged (at most) a Reformation in the first place. The pursuit of truth requires a willingness to accept that which we do not already accept (this is the very foundation stone of learning), and a willingness to accept that many things we do not know, and will never know, are also true.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Rob Bell at his best

Would you consider the audio edition of Love Wins to be better than the print version?

Yes

What did you like best about this story?

I love anything Rob Bell puts out. He able to articulate exactly what I feel.

What does Rob Bell bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

His Passion

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Controversial but relevant

Any additional comments?

Love Rob Bell or hate him he make you think. I love his teachings.

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Thought provoking but not rigorous

Rob Bell attempts to dispel some of the anecdotal theology which has come up to surround the Bible that is unsupported by the Bible itself. To this end he succeeds, but he quickly moves from dispelling bad theology to doubting incontrovertible truths of scripture. He rightly identifies god as the focal point of heaven, the reality of a physical and enjoyable place, and the need for condemnation of the unrepentant. However, he fails to close the door on some heresies which the Bible is in fact explicit about. He emphasizes God's love to the point of mistaking it for the whole of God's character rather than one of his attributes, and skews his interpretation of what love should look like to fit his personal expectations to the point of undoing many well supported doctrines regarding Hell. To this end I would highly recommend reading Francis Chan's book Crazy Love either instead of or along with this book should you choose to read Love Wins. Ultimately, Rob Bell narrowly steers clear of outright espousing any heretical theological positions, but in his exploration of possible interpretation he leaves the door open on many doctrines about which the Bible leaves no wiggle room. I cannot in good conscience recommend this book, either to the unbeliever who could mistake Bell's willingness to abandon sound doctrine with the unsound doctrines at the point of personal preference, or to the believer looking to expand his understanding of scripture as Bell relies more heavily in his own interpretation and assumptions than the vast array of scripture that undermines most of his more controversial conclusions and suggestions. I can only really recommend this book to someone who is interacting with a friend, family member or coworker who is enamored with Love Wins so that you can in love help them to separate the important valid points that Bell makes (which have been made by others before him and will be made by others in the future) from his overreaching assertions brought forth from faulty assumptions and infusing his opinions and definitions to mold scripture to fit his expectations, and then I would recommend supplementing it with either Crazy Love or another book which challenges the conclusions Bell reaches. Finally test everything Bell and others say with the totality of scripture, not just the proof texts they offer. Bell has some good points, but the number of and implications from unwarranted assertions from Bell lead me to recommend against reading this book unless you have a desire and the time to thoroughly engage the text and the scriptures so as to not be misled by some sweet sounding doctrinal errors.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

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i'd be thrilled

While I can't say that I concur, agree, subscribe or have completely made my mind up about every idea and thought in this book, I can say that I have enjoyed the thoughts, conversations and discussions that have come out of listening to it. I've actually listened to it 3 times because it's pretty short.

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A great read

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

This is not a boot that takes an intellectual/academic look at religion, it is an example of spiritual apologetics centered in modern, mainstream liberal Christianity. Within this context, it is honest and explores many of the critical issues that secular readers would find interesting and skeptics would find crucial to explain. It makes a good case for liberality within Christianity and is very persuasive, speaking to the heart of the reader.

Have you listened to any of Rob Bell’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

no

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  • Bobby
  • Tampa Fl
  • 05-15-12

Man this makes your really think

If you could sum up Love Wins in three words, what would they be?

Ballsy, Humble, and Hopeful.

What other book might you compare Love Wins to and why?

The Ragamuffin Gospel by Brennan Manning

Have you listened to any of Rob Bell’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

To my knowledge i have listened to all of his other books. This one, he is still the same old Rob... very approachable, humble and of course he has fun talking about this one... however he seems less goofy that in "Jesus wants to save Christians".

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

No laughing of crying... just a lot of questions and some pretty awesome conversations.

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Thank you, Rob Bell.

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

This book was hopeful, grace-filled, and in line with Biblical theology. It dives deep into what the Bible actually says about Heaven, Hell, and the fate of every person who ever lived, and doesn't just rehash church doctrine, classic theology, or scholars' opinions on the subject. It adds a much needed perspective these days to Jesus' story that isn't mainstreamed from the mega-church stadiums, and for that, I say, "Thank you, Rob Bell."