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Publisher's Summary

By meditating on personal examples from the author's life, as well as reflecting on the inspirational life and writings of Thomas Merton, stories from the Gospels, as well as the lives of other holy men and women (among them, Henri Nouwen, Therese of Lisieux, and Pope John XXIII), the listener will understand how becoming who you are, and becoming the person that God created, is a simple path to happiness, peace of mind and even sanctity.

©2006 Paulist Press, Inc (P)2011 Paulist Press

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
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Personally Life Changing

Father Martin's meditation on Thomas Merton helped me understand what Merton meant by the false self. It is the self we develop to hide our true self from friends, family and co-workers. It is the social self that attempts to appear hip, slick and cool when none of those things are true. The false self is a road block to finding who you truly are.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

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thought provoking

Although it was read a little slowly, I thought, the wisdow in this book is powerful. I was touched.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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  • Lucas
  • Gallatin, TN, United States
  • 08-22-12

Not bad, it's worth listening to...

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Becoming aware of your "true" and "false" is productive to your spiritual life.<br/>The book was more on Fr. Martins life than it was Thomas Merton.

If you’ve listened to books by James Martin before, how does this one compare?

About the same.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Great Reading and Listening.

What made the experience of listening to Becoming Who You Are the most enjoyable?

This is an UNabridged version of this excellent, narrated by the Author, Fr. James Martin sj. Fr. Jim is the Curtural Editor of America magazine and I read his work regularly. His writing is nothing short of brilliant. So, I had very high expectations when I purchased this piece. I can honestly say that the audio book exceeded my expectations.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Becoming Who You Are?

The expert interpretation or translation of Thomas Merton's writing and thinking. Fr. Martin provides is very enlightening even to an older person like me. I am a 73 year old retiree.

Have you listened to any of James Martin’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No other experience. But, if I discover any, I will acquire them immediately.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I intend to listen (and simultaneously read) a second time and in one sitting.

Any additional comments?

Intend to purchase all of Merton's work available in audiobooks.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

, becoming who you are

The entire book is worth reading,,, but the last chapter is one of the most moving reads I have ever encountered . It is also one of the most practical applications of the writings of scholars and non-scholars I have ever read in my 72 years.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Not what I expected

This book was repetitive and did not have much depth. Just read Nowen or Merton instead.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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It was ok.

It's a fairly decent story. There is nothing profound. But...... If you listen as if it's a conversation then it's a quite enjoyable chat. Easy to listen to. No topic to heavy. I would listen to it again.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • J
  • 08-31-17

I liked the the first four chapters

This was my first James Martin book. My heart was ready for contemplating self-acceptance on a deeper Christian level, and this worked out nicely.
This book started off very light with an introduction to Merton, whom I was only slightly aware of as a philosphical "name" worth remembering.
The book gently leads into the false/true self dichotomy of self-analysis. It is only covered briefly, and James Martin gets on with trying to get at what this all means. He does a beautiful job, and naturally reveals his own story to further elucidate the concepts and questions at play.
So, the first four chapters were great for me.

However I was much less into the covering of Nouwen, and felt that it got the book off track.

I also did not agree with the easy passivity that James Martin used in handling the subject of the sin of sexual immorality. This was a small part of the book, but it may offend some. Sexual sinners do not need to find their true self in sin, but in who they are in Christ, who had no sin. Then through walking out their repentance in faith, Christ can redeem their true self immediately and in each step they take in grace and truth. Finally their flesh may live in peace with the spirit. However, one may need to look at other sins that may contribute to this problem. One example could be a vow of celibacy that is taken before one has received the spiritual gift of self-control. There is a reason Paul said for some to get married!

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Excellent Food for Thought

"Becoming Who You Are" was an excellent listen! It was superb inspiration on several mornings at the gym and on my walk to work. Fr. Jim Martin is one of the great translators of 20th century Catholic writers for the 21st century audience.

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Well Done

The subject is, I believe, fundamental, and I know first hand the pain that comes from not knowing oneself or how to pursue it. It is an awful darkness. It was also a little hard for me to hear of Jesus being spoken of in such a human manner, interesting that it bothered me. Guess I will be meditating on that ! Thank you Fr. Martin, I have gained a great deal from your books. The Jesuits Guide was the first "Catholic" book I read during my conversion and I refer to it when I have a difficult discernment. This book too will be one I continue to draw wisdom in my continuing walk toward sainthood !

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  • Leo Delaney
  • 09-29-15

Helping to rekindle my Roman Catholic Faith

Would you listen to Becoming Who You Are again? Why?

Yes, it provided a number of points which allowed me to meditate/day dream/muse on. So much so, I have no doubt I will gain more from listening to it again as I have no doubt missed considerations.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Becoming Who You Are?

The honesty. It shows how people who are far more intelligent, 'Holy' and greater humans than I were not always saints. They were human, they had faults and failings that emphasised the need to be kinder to ourselves and forgive ourselves.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

There were many instances in the book that gave me much food for thought.

Any additional comments?

Five Stars for me as it was what I wanted/needed. I could see how if you did not want such information to meditate on, persons could mark it as 4 stars. If you want something to help focus your thought processes on trying to lead a good life according to the Christian Faith and would benefit from considering real people with real lives and real honest issues and how even the 'best and brightest' struggled with their spiritual lives throughout their lives, this is well worth considering. I took a lot from it. It points in many ways more to further questions than providing answers because we are all different.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Tracy
  • 04-22-17

Simple, contemporary and profound

Martin seems to have blended important principles from different popular Christian writers, mainly Merton and Neuwen, into Martin's own journey that relates to contemporary life. I think many will receive and digest important if not crucial messages passed on by these modern saints; that being help in identifying the subtle difference between the quench to attain, achieve and grow for reasons that are wholesome and true to ourselves and for reasons that are more to do with cravings and desires that are never satisfied and false. This book helps those who are searching to live authentically according to who we are, thereby attaining a deeply rich and fulfilling life that is re-connected with God, and written in a way where the average person in the street can understand.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful