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Publisher's Summary

From the author of the acclaimed Simply Christian and Surprised by Hope comes a book that addresses the question that has plagued humans for centuries - what is our purpose?

As Christians, what are we to do with that ambiguous time between baptism and the funeral? It’s easy to become preoccupied with who gets into heaven; the real challenge is how we are going to live in the here and now. Wright dispels the common misconception that Christian living is nothing more than a checklist of do's and don’ts. Nor is it a prescription to “follow your heart” wherever it may lead. Instead, After You Believe reveals the Bible’s call for a revolution - a transformation of character that takes us beyond our earthly pursuit of money, sex, and power into a virtuous state of living that allows us to reflect God and live more worshipful, fulfilling lives.

We are all spiritual seekers, intuitively knowing there is more to life than we suspect. This is a book for anyone who is hoping there is something more while we’re here on Earth. There is. We are being called to join the revolution, and Wright insightfully encourages readers to find new purpose and clarity by taking us on an eye-opening journey through key biblical passages that promise to radically alter the work of the church and the direction of our lives.

©2010 Nicholas Thomas Wright (P)2010 HarperCollins Publishers

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Wayne
  • IRvine, CA, United States
  • 04-11-11

True Spirituality

Definitely a challenge theologically, though in non-technical words. I thought this was deja vu: riding on my mountain bike on San Juan trail and listening to Tom Wright instead of Dallas Willard's "The Divine Conspiracy: Rediscovering Our Hidden Life In God." They both reinterpret the beatitudes from the Sermon on the Mount to move from legalism to grace. They both are intellectuals, theological and devoted to correct thinking as a key to transformation. They have both transformed my life, my spirituality, my understanding of Agape. But Wright's theology is broader and more significant than Willard's. He integrates so many themes that neatly weave together: Kingdom ethics vs legalism, eschatology (study of end times) as Hope, and Love.

Wright's most profound theological explication is that we are not to become moral, but to empty ourselves as Jesus did--to live for the purpose of God's Kingdom only--not our own desires. Even Jesus had to "learn" to do this as he was fully human, and felt the temptation for self satisfaction, but continuously and "perfectly" (telos) resisted. He was not an example of moral virtue primarily (though he was), but an example of one fully yielded to God. And now we too, through his resurrection, by the Holy Spirit (holiness & prayer), can participate not only in the Kingdom to Come (telos), but now, in the Kingdom that has now Come in Jesus' life, death and resurrection. Wish this theme had predominated, because it is the basis of spiritual transformation.

Another motivation for living spiritually and not legalistically is because of the Hope we have in the renewal and transformation of this present world, where we will participate with holiness and power. Looking forward to reading his book on Hope next.

While Wright and Willard are strong theologically, they both lack the everyday relational wisdom that properly integrates the intellectual, spiritual, social, emotional, "imaginational," and behavioral dimensions into a whole.

16 of 19 people found this review helpful

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The need for Christian Character Matters!

A Wonderful exploration of why Christian Character and Virtue is so very important to us

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Not his best, but NT Wright is always great

This book is not nearly as deep and didactic as Surprised by Scripture, but is far more practical and applicable, especially for newer Christians. It started kind of slow, but gets more and more meaningful and convicting as it progresses.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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A fresh perspective on character

NT Wright, as always, does a fantastic job on shedding new light on a topic readers might think they have all figured out. I read this book with a study group of guys and the discussion was great.
Wright balances being highly readable to the uninitiated and writes with a depth that seasoned readers of Christian literature will still reap greatly from. Loved this book. I recommend it highly!

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Rethinking Discipleship

This book challenged me to rethink the common beliefs we have about discipleship in the Christian faith. Wright explains that discipleship ultimately comes down to bringing God greater glory and advancing God's mission. In that, he writes we become more Christlike, but becoming like Christ is not the pursuit of discipleship. Wright warns that spiritual formation that produces pride, not humility, reveals critical problems in our development as believers. Why Christian character matters after we believe has eternal consequences - NOT in where we end up because our security is in Jesus' victory, but in what the next life will be like.

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Thought Provoking

The Christian West has really fallen down on the issue of properly formed character and personal integrity. N.T. Wright confronts this issue and offers options for further growth as a Christian person.

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Worthy to pick up again

Would you consider the audio edition of After You Believe to be better than the print version?

I am listening for the third time in the last two months. The inauguration of eschatology in our lifetime of a life giving kingdom should not have been a surprise to a Christian community endowed with an ample scriptural heritage. There is so much here to be digested that I will be getting the kindle version.

What did you like best about this story?

I enjoyed the comparison of the Christian virtue with the classical tradition of the Greeks. Mr Wright is a master of using commonplace images and stories to bring clarity to how we reach the Telos or Goal.

Any additional comments?

The best material I have encountered in Wright's work.

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  • Linda
  • Bradenton, FL, United States
  • 04-22-15

Inspirational

Truly enjoyed his views on many matters ! May look for his earlier books mentioned in this one. Trying now to incorporate what I read!

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Love Wright, but...

I am now listening to the Pope's latest book and I know why I like it so much. I LOVE reading Wright but it's too much work for this lowbrow American to process the British accent. Benedict XVI was wise to get a narrator who speaks American.

2 of 8 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Good book but the reader doesn't know how to read scripture references

The content of this book is excellent! However, Harper Audio did not train the reader or select a reader with prior knowledge of how to read scripture references.

1 Corinthians is not read as First Corinthians but a One Corinthians for example.

This makes it hard to take the book seriously.

0 of 5 people found this review helpful