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Publisher's Summary

CIA case officer, Kent Clizbe, analyzes counter-intelligence details to demonstrate that KGB covert influence agents in American education and academia, Hollywood, and the media inserted the anti-American payload that became 'Political Correctness' (PC). The KGB officers suffered death in Stalin's purges. Their American accomplices, not needing guidance, built the elite mindset of "reflexive loathing of the United States and its people," that defines PC.

In 2008, America elected its first PC President. Obama ran on a barely concealed platform of PC loathing of America and its people. Now we see the results. Willing Accomplices provides the foundation for critical consideration of the roots of the PC-Progressive political platform and its dire consequences in 21st century America.

©2011 Kent Clizbe (P)2013 Kent Clizbe

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  • Allan
  • Not yet far enuf
  • 11-30-13

How did we get here? Your education begins here.

What did you love best about Willing Accomplices?

The work gives the reader a fine overview of the roots of the otherwise inexplicable "politically correct" theme currently eating away at the fabric of the nation.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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This explains today's "progressives"

If you've wondered what Hillary meant when she described herself as a "progressive" in the mold of early 20th century "progressives", this is a must listen!
If you don't like the direction that our government is taking us, this is a must listen!
If you wonder where our education system gets its idiotic ideas, this is a must listen!
It takes a village. Total subjugation of the masses is the goal - collectivism is the kinder gentler term.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Disappointed

In concept, this book represents a very interesting topic. In practice, this book represents an extreme caricature of American conservatism. I cannot speak to the accuracy of content but it's primarily personal conjecture rooted in skewed source data.

I suppose this book represents a side of propaganda battle, though it comes off as propaganda itself.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Should be required reading for EVERYONE

If you could sum up Willing Accomplices in three words, what would they be?

USA USA USA

What other book might you compare Willing Accomplices to and why?

Nothing else compares to this. It is one of a kind

Have you listened to any of Douglas R. Pratt’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Haven't listened to other performances

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Communism tries to destroy America and democracy

Any additional comments?

Incredible insights from a person with experience.

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  • Roger
  • 08-29-13

Interesting, but needs editing.

Overall I liked this book. The beginning I found rather frustrating though, and nearly gave up. I am glad I didn't though.
I don't like books that frequently say that they will be talking further about a particular topic later. At the beginning the book is full of "we'll explore that later" and "you will learn in chapter x more about this" and, the most over-used of all "as we will see later".

The other big niggle is that there were quite a number of repetitions. I think the work should have been checked over by someone else with a view to cutting these out as unnecessary and to make the book more digestible.
It's rather disorganised too, and the author takes a while to decide whether the book is about him, his career (he touts himself a bit!) or the historical subject. It's untidy.

By the 4th (chapter/part - I lost track!) I warmed to the author. He has taken a subject that needs much more coverage and he has really researched thoroughly. Why haven't more authors considered where political correctness came from? In "Marxism, Multiculturalism and Free Speech" Dr Frank Ellis points out that the first person to use this phrase was Lenin.
Douglas Pratt has taken up where Dr Ellis left off, and I'm glad he did.

Stick with it!