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Publisher's Summary

The size and stability of the American middle class were once the envy of the world. But changes unleashed in the 1960s pitted Americans against one another politically in new and destructive ways. These battles continued to rage from that day to now, while everyone has fallen behind economically except the wealthy. Right-wing culture warriors blamed the decline on the moral shortcomings of "other" Americans - black people, feminists, gays, immigrants, union members - to court a fearful white working- and middle-class base with ever more bitter "us vs. them" politics. Liberals tried, but mostly failed, to make the case that we're all in this together.

In What's the Matter with White People?, popular Salon columnist Joan Walsh argues that the biggest divide in America today is not about party or ideology, but about two competing narratives for why everything has fallen apart since the 1970s. One side sees an America that has spent the last 40 years bankrupting the country providing benefits and advantages to the underachieving, the immoral, and the undeserving, no matter the cost to Middle America. The other sees an America that has spent the last 40 years bankrupting the country providing benefits and advantages to the very rich, while allowing a measure of cultural progress for the different and the downtrodden. It matters which side is right, and how the other side got things so wrong.

Walsh connects the dots of American decline through trends that began in the 1970s and continue today - including the demise of unions, the stagnation of middle-class wages, the extension of the right's "Southern Strategy" throughout the country, the victory of Reagan Republicanism, the increase in income inequality, and the drop in economic mobility.

Citing her extended family as a case in point, Walsh shows how liberals unwittingly collaborated in the "us vs. them" narrative, rather than developing an inspiring, persuasive vision of a more fair, united America. She also explores how the GOP's renewed culture war.

©2013 Joan Walsh (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

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Frustration

If you could sum up What's the Matter with White People? in three words, what would they be?

White conservatives feelings are hurt because we did not listen to them. Liberals aren't nice to them. It is okay for them to treat POC with impunity but we have to be nice to them because they are not used to not getting the rewards with little effort. Tired of hearing this to explain why they vote again their self interest.

What about Joan Walsh’s performance did you like?

I can listen to her performance without drifting off. Did not distract from the content.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

We hurt the white man's fee fee. Now we all pay.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
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Good book!

I appreciate Joan's honesty. Every American should read this book. The truth will set them free, if they can handle the truth.

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Way to go Joan!

I love this book. I can't wait to read it again, I love the fact she points out the similarities of the Irish & blacks with a brief history lesson. The story of her family is cute & funny with a good understanding of the dynamics of a political Irish American family growing up in New York. To cap it off with how America views race & the long way we have to go.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Great read

Lots of facts behind a surprising amount of heart and self reflection. I would definitely recommend it to anyone interested in racial and political landscapes and how they've changed in the US.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Enjoyable book

Loved Joan Walsh's narration. Kept my interest. Very informative if you are into politics. Looking forward to future books from Ms Walsh.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful