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Publisher's Summary

In the era of colorblindness, it is no longer socially permissible to use race, explicitly, as a justification for discrimination, exclusion, and social contempt. Yet, as legal star Michelle Alexander reveals, today it is perfectly legal to discriminate against convicted criminals in nearly all the ways that it was once legal to discriminate against African Americans. Once you’re labeled a felon, the old forms of discrimination - employment discrimination, housing discrimination, denial of the right to vote, denial of educational opportunity, denial of food stamps and other public benefits, and exclusion from jury service - are suddenly legal.

©2012 Michelle Alexander (P)2012 Recorded Books, LLC

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.7 out of 5.0
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    3,822
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  • 2 Stars
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  • 1 Stars
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Performance

  • 4.7 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 4.7 out of 5.0
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Losing my "innocence", thank goodness

This is an essential reading for everyone regardless of color. As I listened I was astounded to learn how we have systematically excluded people of color from achieving the American dream. It has changed the way I hear the daily news and my daily dialog.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • summer
  • Pennsylvania
  • 01-27-17

Important message

Repetitive and boring style, reads like a graduate thesis, but the message it delivers is powerful and needs to be heard.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Repetetive

The thesis is repeated 10 times in every chapter. The book could entail the same information and make a better more succinct point.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Inspirational!

This book is a life changer. It really opened me to whats going on around me. I've been motivated to seek change.
Great Book!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Include in classroom History Readings

Very informative and stimulating!! This book should be a must read for all middle school students!!!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A bit repetitive.

Seemed like I was listening to the same story several times. This required dedication to finish.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

An Important Work of Non-Fiction

If you could sum up The New Jim Crow in three words, what would they be?

This work of investigative history reveals the roots of racial inequality in American Justice; the secret 'mission' of the prison-industrial complex, the racism inherent to the justice system, and how it relates to the 'social caste' system in America. This book is a revelation AND truly revolutionary.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Plantation Prison System: The New Slavery in Neo-Feudal America

9 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Jon
  • Klamath Falls, OR, United States
  • 12-05-12

Inexcusable and indefensible.

What made the experience of listening to The New Jim Crow the most enjoyable?

This book documents the war on drugs with all of its impact on our society. While the war may benefit the owners of commercial jails, the impact on people of color is tragic. It is hard to imagine that this book cn be ignored, and change is inevitable if .it is widely read by intelligent and honest people.

What did you like best about this story?

All that is necessary for evil totriumph is for good people to do nothing. I doubt that anyone, even Republicans, will read this book and not seek change..

Have you listened to any of Karen Chilton’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

One of the most important books I've ever read.

Any additional comments?

After finishing the book I bought eight copies in paperback for others to read. This is not an easy read, but it is a "must read".

10 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Howard
  • Grove City, PA, United States
  • 09-19-14

More victomology, really?

While the disproportionate level of black incarceration reported in this book is shocking enough to rally the objective minded into accepting the idea that racial bias is to blame, with deeper thought we can see how easily disparate causes may be conflated in this issue.
Is it honest to lump the high number of incarcerated black males into the same group as if all of them are victims, even if the legacy of unfair discrimination prejudices us in that direction? How many of the jailed group got there legitimately? The idea that the “get tough on crime” philosophy decried in this work is a conscious effort to herd black men into jail is the sort of comment that depends heavily upon white guilt, a tactic worn threadbare from overuse. Are we expected to follow some kind of quota system so that only a proportionate number of black offenders are taken off the street?
The author insists that the war on drugs is a vehicle of oppression. But having identified it as such, why does she not encourage resistance to this exposed enemy? Why not rally African-Americans to reject illegal drugs and the culture that sustains those drugs, now that the way forward is clear? Instead she uses the malady as an excuse, blaming the usual suspects, as if a group can truly grow strong by compelling another group to lift them out of a pit. Nay! I have seen and known far too many tough and admirable African-Americans to buy this argument.
And as other reviewers have noted, to conveniently leave out the pivotal detail about Ricky Ray Rector’s execution—that he damaged his own brain with a suicide attempt—leaves a hole in her credibility one could drive a truck through.

8 of 12 people found this review helpful