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Publisher's Summary

Following his #1 New York Times best seller Our Endangered Values, the former president, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, offers an assessment of what must be done to bring permanent peace to Israel, with dignity and justice for Palestine.

President Carter, who was able to negotiate peace between Israel and Egypt, has remained deeply involved in Middle East affairs since leaving the White House. He has stayed in touch with the major players from all sides in the conflict and has made numerous trips to the Holy Land, most recently as an observer of the Palestinian elections in 2005 and 2006.

In this book, President Carter shares his intimate knowledge of the history of the Middle East and his personal experiences with the principal actors, and he addresses sensitive political issues many American officials avoid. Pulling no punches, Carter prescribes steps that must be taken for the two states to share the Holy Land without a system of apartheid or the constant fear of terrorism.

The general parameters of a long-term, two-state agreement are well known, the president writes. There will be no substantive and permanent peace for any peoples in this troubled region as long as Israel is violating key U.N. resolutions, official American policy, and the international "road map" for peace by occupying Arab lands and oppressing the Palestinians.

Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid is a challenging, provocative, and courageous work.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.
Download the accompanying reference guide.
©2006 Jimmy Carter. All Rights Reserved; (P) 2006 Simon and Schuster, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Not So much...

Jimmy Carter doesn't have both oars in the water with this book. Overly critical of Israel, he forgives Arab aggression with only casual mention. Neither does he mention that the impetus for that aggression is Islam but blames more the Jews. For example, Carter condemns Israel for trying to divert Jordan headwaters but never mentions that the Arabs previously did the same thing several times. In fact, the first (albeit failed) jihad that His friend Arafat went on with 'Al Fata' was to bomb a water pumping station. In fact all of Carters critical references of Jewish retaliation is due to initial Arabic aggression. Without which,with a few exceptions, the Jews would not have done the retaliation they are accused of. Carter never met a dictator he didn't like, including Arafat. He slanders every Jewish leader in this book but never so much as mentions any of the known corruption of Arafat. He overlooks 3 conditions that give the Jews the right to occupy this area. 1. They won it in war that was started by the other side. No country is ever mandated to give back territory under these conditions. 2. The Jews were there first, regardless if his friend Arafat denies the existence of King David. 3. As opposed to Muslim destruction, the Jews have historically shown they would take care of the place and let all religions visit their shrines in peace. There are some trivial factual errors in the book as well. For example, Carter says that Yom Kippur was the only nuclear alert....yet we went to Defcon 2 at Cuban Missile crisis. There are much better reads for accuracy and less bias by Dore Gold and Max I Dimont. Or try "O Jerusalem". Carter dreams that peace in the middle east will be reached by negotiations. That would only be possible if the Arabs were in agreement, bound in some way, and centrally controlled.... instead of by verses in the Koran that say,"Kill the Christian, kill the Jew, wherever you find them", Sura 9:5. Only coloring books in the Carter library, please!

11 of 35 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • John
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 08-24-07

What a Waste

A pitiful anti-Israel diatribe by the worst president of the 20th century. Charming language but hardly an objective description of the situation. To equate Israel's border with apartheid is simple ridiculous. The author should go back to building houses and leave politics alone

7 of 27 people found this review helpful