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Kaat  By  cover art

Kaat

By: Edward Hamlin
Narrated by: Carolyn Cook
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Publisher's summary

Kaat is ready to marry her girlfriend Stone. They live together in Paris, are both pursuing their careers, and have even talked about having a baby. Then a motorcycle accident disrupts Kaat's plans, and she is confronted by flaws in their seemingly perfect life and a secret that could destroy everything.

©2017 Emerson College (P)2017 Audible, Inc.
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: LGBTQ+

What listeners say about Kaat

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Bikes vs Humans

I guess finding true love on the back of a motorcycle might be a crazy thing to do.

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Lesbian fiction written by a man

I don't mean that as a "reader beware" it anything. There were just a number of times during the story where I got taken out of it because it felt like it was focusing on the wrong things. For example, at the end (after what I'd call the climax, but not quite at the denouement proper), Kaat thinks about losing her virginity to a young man and deriving absolutely no joy from the experience. It's not outright distasteful, but it's mostly out of nowhere and feels gross because there's some minor dubcon to it. And the only reason I can imagine the author felt including this at that time (or any time) is their assumption that that moment must have had profound impact upon her life. Perhaps it does for some lesbians. Maybe a lot of lesbians, I don't know. What I do know is that men essentially never need women to be hurt like this in their stories, and yet it seems a curious prerequisite. It's