Regular price: $41.99

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

There is no story in 20th-century history more important to understand than Hitler’s rise to power and the collapse of civilization in Nazi Germany. With The Coming of the Third Reich, Richard Evans, one of the world’s most distinguished historians, has written the definitive account for our time. A masterful synthesis of a vast body of scholarly work integrated with important new research and interpretations, Evans’s history restores drama and contingency to the rise to power of Hitler and the Nazis, even as it shows how ready Germany was by the early 1930s for such a takeover to occur. The Coming of the Third Reich is a masterwork of the historian’s art and the book by which all others on the subject will be judged.

©2005 Richard J. Evans (P)2010 Gildan Media Corp

Critic Reviews

"[A]n impressive achievement.... [Evans'] opus will be one of the major historical works of our time." (The Atlantic)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    603
  • 4 Stars
    386
  • 3 Stars
    145
  • 2 Stars
    51
  • 1 Stars
    25

Performance

  • 4.1 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    399
  • 4 Stars
    289
  • 3 Stars
    124
  • 2 Stars
    35
  • 1 Stars
    37

Story

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    505
  • 4 Stars
    260
  • 3 Stars
    78
  • 2 Stars
    33
  • 1 Stars
    12
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Great read for both the expert or beginner!

The author has divided the book into sections such as education, military, history, culture, etc. which makes it very easy to see and for the first time understand how the country was taken over. Most books and documentaries attempt to give a linear history which becomes very complicated resulting in the loss of a lot of information. Some of the information given has been mentioned previously but the overall relationship to the coming of Hitler has never been as thoroughly explained until now. I have been reading on Hitler for several years and like others, have been searching for the reason that the German people turned to him for a leader. In my opinion, this book finally answers the question. Whether you are already familiar with the story of the German people and Hitler or just beginning - there is much to learn from this author's research and his organization of the massive amount of data available on the subject.

The book is in narrative form and is the first of a three book series on Germany. I am now reading the second book in the series, The Third Reich in Power, which is focusing on the actual take-over of Germany by the Nazi Party..

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Amazing book

This book is written by a Historian's Historian: the attention to historical detail is mind-boggling; grand theorizing is refreshingly absent, totally subordinated to factual narrative; and the clarity of historical causation (i.e. that the vast and contingent complexities of particular moments and places in time are the only thing that can possibly explain the ways that history unfolds) is stark. This is a brilliant and revealing book, packed with fascinating information about its subject. If this is not political science theory, it is also not biography. Hitler is just one player, albeit very important, in his account. In short, this is a serious book for people who are seriously interested in the period. And it happens to be written extremely well .. in a lively, eloquent, compelling way .. and narrated nicely. But it is not a book for people looking for easy answers, short-cut theories, or facile biographical explanations. Indeed, this is one of those rare books that is both crafted by a master scholar and entertaining to read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Ian
  • Farnborough, United Kingdom
  • 03-16-12

Fascinating History, questionable narration

I have gone through a few books about this period recently. Exploring the period running up to a disaster is at least as important as studying the disaster. This is an effective study of the period from before the First World War up until the Nazi assumpton of power. I'm no historian but it seems pretty thorough and even handed in its approach and I certainly learned plenty.

The narration is not dreadful but there are definitely faults. I accept that sometimes pronunciation is a personal thing but there are words where the guy not only can't pronounce them but appears not to understand what they mean. "Bowdlerised" is the one that sticks in my mind. Maybe its excusable but in a text that uses the word several times you would expect him to look it up so that he doesn't sound confused every time he says it.

If you are at all interested in this period of history then I would highly recommend this book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • sarah
  • wildwood, MO, United States
  • 10-21-11

Fantastic content, very very poor narration

What did you love best about The Coming of the Third Reich?

A meaty plunge into the history of the origins of the main players of the third reich. It layed out in copious detail the beginnings of the Nazi regime.

Would you be willing to try another one of Sean Pratt’s performances?

NO NO NO!!! (altho I may be forced to since I plan to listen to the remaining two books in this triligy). He is a very.......poor......narrator.......with .........inappropriately........placed........and ........lengthy ........pauses......(are you frustrated reading my visual representation of his vocal cadence yet?) intersperced throughout his narration.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Not necessarily

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Rollin
  • Cholula, Mexico
  • 09-23-11

wonderful history, poorly narrated

Richard Evans has produced a magnificent, detailed and expert, but very accessible overview of Germany between the rise of Bismarck and WWII. He delves into social history, intellectual currents, politics and ideology, military affairs, international relations and economics. It is truly a TOTAL history with deep insight into the many threads leading up to the Third Reich.

Unfortunately, Sean Pratt does a poor job of narrating. He over enunciates and makes long pauses between strings of adjectives. He confuses rich arguments by the author with slow, almost infantile narration. His consistent mispronunciation of words in German is a minor annoyance, but it reveals a narrator who has not done his homework.

Still, for lovers of history and those interested in the period, Evans' book is extremely interesting and worthwhile.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Michelle
  • MILLINOCKET, ME, United States
  • 01-01-11

Terrific

I found the book to be very thorough, giving me much that I didn't know, and I've read a lot on the subject, as well as a more neutral perspective, which I appreciated. I can hardly wait until next month, to begin the second book in the trilogy. Unlike others, I thought the reader did very well. If there were unnecessary pauses, they didn't distract from the text, as far as I noticed.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

For the novice and the expert

Very detailed account of the dawn of the Third Reich from the late 19th century until their consolidation of power in the early 30's. Rather than focusing on the formation and history of the NAZI party, it focuses on the social beliefs and conditions that contributed in both its formation and popularity. Good for those with very little foreknowledge of the topic and for those that are well versed in the period. The narration is good as well, not overbearing but not dull enough to lull you to sleep.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

awful

wrote a longer review for the third reich at war.
engaging at times, but long stretches where this is just boring. Part of this is the reading is terrible. in addition, i find the author to be very arrogant. In the beginning of the book he talks (for over an hour) on his goals for the book. I find it amazing that he is so critical of Shirer's book, who has the advantage of actually having lived through the period. Then on top of that he argues that he is not here to be judgemental of the nazi regime. Hello? Every sentence he is being judgemental.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Good history book... but it's a history book...

This is a great book on the history of how fascism came to power in German, but at the same time it is a history book. It goes into a lot of minutia, so if you want an exciting read or something with more of a narrative than a report of facts and a timeline, then this isn't the book for you.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

riveting ..

... "horrifying" and "unspeakable," i suppose i shall withhold until parts two and three, respectively of this series (to which i have listened).

the fall of the doomed weimar republic was truly riveting. evans addresses society in post wwi germany from as many perspectives as one can imagine.

as a whole, this series of books leaves one shaking one's head at the depths to which humanity can sink.

erik larson, author of "In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin" had an interview with terry gross ('fresh air') and alludes to the very real depression he felt by the time he got to book three.

all i can do is agree.

these are 'must listen' books, but be ready ...

2 of 3 people found this review helpful