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Publisher's Summary

Pulitzer Prize, General Nonfiction, 2009

In this groundbreaking historical expose, Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history: an Age of Neoslavery that thrived from the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II.

Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Douglas A. Blackmon unearths the lost stories of slaves and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude shortly thereafter.

By turns moving, sobering, and shocking, this unprecedented account reveals the stories of those who fought unsuccessfully against the re-emergence of human labor trafficking, the companies that profited most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.

©2009 Douglas A. Blackmon (P)2010 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

“Shocking....Eviscerates one of our schoolchildren's most basic assumptions: that slavery in America ended with the Civil War.” (The New York Times)
“The genius of Blackmon's book is that it illuminates both the real human tragedy and the profoundly corrupting nature of the Old South slavery as it transformed to establish a New South social order.” (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

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Very Well Written But Sad, Disturbing

This book illustrates man's inhumanity to man. In light of what is happening in this country now, it certainly continues. An eye-opening read.

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breathtaking simply breathtaking

overall this book was one of the best books I've ever read or basically had to study yet still I don't know of any place yet that I can place the improvements excellent book highly recommend it to others I mean excellent

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Unforgettable

I'm not sure I've ever read such a powerful book. It has greatly informed my worldview.

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  • Corky
  • Sedona, AZ, United States
  • 09-21-17

Sobering & Shameful

Blackmon is a masterful storyteller and historian, and one wishes this were just a fictional story and not eye-opening, gut-wrenching history. I would hope that every Caucasian like myself were willing to scape off the icing covering a very ugly cake, and get a taste of the peonage slavery of millions of African Americans from 1880 to 1950. Sobering, sad and shameful... yet also inspiring when fortitude, family loyalty, and faith penetrate the darkness. A must read for any student of American history and for all who want to build bridges of racial understanding and reconciliation.

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Reparations In Memory Of Our Ancestors

This is important information to support our claim for repairing our children and our children's children's children for the abuse, and inhuman treatment of our Ancestors. Many of us are still suffering, because of what happened during Slavery. 210-268-3554

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Awe inspiring

This book allowed me to see and feel the horrible lives of my ancestors and the inconceivable sadistic treatment the slave owners as well as sheriff and others upon black race. This rage was predominantly in the south. I am grateful to the author that opened my
Eyes to truths that I was privileged to see. A must read to anyone seeking truths concerning the horror of slavery.

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An important historical document

Any additional comments?

You need to read/listen to this book to understand what it meant to be black in the south during the Jim Crow era. Slavery did not end in 1865, it continued at least until the second world war, just different. This book aught to turn your stomach. If there is a weakness, it could have included more statistics. The personal stories were well narrated, however.

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A Terrifying History of Forced Labor, Torture and Death Long into the 20th Century

This book stunned me. I can't say I am surprised that white Americans perpetrated the disgusting acts and created the ongoing terror of life for African Americans in the late 19th and early 20th century this book describes. As a white American, I am grateful for the revelation of this history and wish it were more widely known.

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Thank you Mr. Blackmon

Wow, I have read many accounts of slavery during my life time. Most have left me disappointed in the human race. Many have even left me mad. However, Mr. Blackmon's work, which I applauded, has left me angry. This was very difficult to read, in fact there were times that I just had to put it down. As angry as I am, this work is a must read for any being that breathes. It frightens me at the likelihood that there still exist men walking the earth who would gladly do all of this again. It is works such as this that I pray will derail the trains of hate prepared to cris-cross this nation. It must end here and now.

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straight to the point

he was a very enjoyable book enjoyed it it was to the point I learned a lot my people had it on