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Publisher's Summary

The town of Silver Ridge, West Virginia, has disappeared from the face of the earth. To the outside world, a chasm of impenetrable mist is all that remains of the town. But inside Silver Ridge, the nightmare is just beginning.

Confined by this unimaginable barrier, the townspeople find themselves confronted by the denizens of a distant dimension: horrifying creatures that intend to transform the valley town into their own outpost. To these extra-dimensional travelers, human beings are nothing more than pests to be exterminated.

Russell Copeland and Debra Harrington are determined to resist the invaders, but as they face death to restore Silver Ridge to its rightful place on Earth, they find that their true enemy may not be the incomprehensible invaders, but an insidious evil whose origin is closer to home than they can imagine.

©2006 Stephen Mark Rainey (P)2010 David N. WIlson

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It Has It's Moments...

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

But overall this one didn't do it for me. I think I would have a enjoyed it a little more if the narrator (who did a great job with the straight text) hadn't been so distractingly bad at the voices. The story takes place in rural West Virginia. The male voices were a little better than the women but generally I found them both cringe-worthy. The story itself started out great but lost me at the end. The story seemed to implode under the weight of a lot of bizarre, mystical, Cthulu-type extra-dimensional elements without a lot of explanation.

If you’ve listened to books by Stephen Mark Rainey before, how does this one compare?

Basil Sands is a good narrator. He just shouldn't do southern drawls. Ever.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful