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Publisher's Summary

1592. England and Spain are at war, yet there is peril at home, too. The death of her trusted spymaster Sir Francis Walsingham has left Queen Elizabeth vulnerable. Conspiracies multiply. The quiet life of John Shakespeare is shattered by a summons from Robert Cecil, the cold but deadly young statesman who dominated the last years of the Queen's long reign, insisting Shakespeare re-enter government service. His mission: to find vital papers, now in the possession of the Earl of Essex. Essex is the brightest star in the firmament, a man of ambition. He woos the Queen, thirty-three years his senior, as if she were a girl his age. She is flattered by him - despite her loathing for his mother, the beautiful, dangerous Lettice Knollys who presides over her own glittering court - a dazzling array of the mad, bad, dangerous and disaffected. When John Shakespeare infiltrates this dissolute world he discovers not only that the Queen herself is in danger - but that he and his family is also a target

With only his loyal footsoldier Boltfoot Cooper at his side, Shakespeare must face implacable forces who believe themselves above the law: men and women who kill without compunction. And in a world of shifting allegiances, just how far he can trust Robert Cecil, his devious new master?

©2010 Rory Clements (P)2011 Oakhill Publishing

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • Simon
  • 02-22-16

could be better

The narrator doesn't appear to have a grasp of the correct accents. Irish and Scottish ascents are very different and this does let the narration down. The narrator's own Midlands accent comes through when it shouldn't and he had chosen a very odd way of portraying Walsingham.
Those used to C.J. Sansom will not like this series. Those not heard of Sansom must, must, must listen to the unabridged Shardlake series. Shardlake wipes the floor with Shakespeare and the author stays true to historical fact.
I am decidedly underwhelmed by the Shakespeare series.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Barbara Steffensen
  • 02-22-16

A good Listen

I enjoyed this book, there was somethimg going on in every chapter.......apparently I have to leave a review of 20 words or more....bla bla bla

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Tim
  • 07-21-15

This is not C J Sansom

Where does Revenger rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This is not C J Sansom but it is trying desperately so to be. Taken in isolation, it is a good tale but being an aficionado of the real thing, it falls a long way short. I recommend you to read Sansom first; leave it a while and then read this.

What other book might you compare Revenger to, and why?

Anything by C J Sansom. Are you getting the picture?

What about Peter Wickham’s performance did you like?

The reader's performance is very good. He has a good pace and the different voices are well defined.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Don't tempt me!

Any additional comments?

'nuff said.

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  • Steven
  • 06-18-15

Good but frustrating

John Shakespeare is the late Tudor James Bond; he wins through in the end after another tangled web of historically satisfying intrigue. But after being ambushed and nearly killed for the umpteenth time by his various enemies you begin to wonder why the author insists on letting him go in alone time after time. It becomes a little formulaic and lacking in credibility.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful