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Publisher's Summary

Seeking to round out the compelling story of the American West, best-selling Lakota author Joseph M. Marshall III brings a new slant to the traditional Western: historical fiction written from the Native American viewpoint.

This riveting story takes place during the Battle of the Hundred in the Hand, otherwise known as the Fetterman Massacre of 1866. The story is told alternately through the eyes of Cloud, a dedicated Lakota warrior who fights alongside a young Crazy Horse, and Max Hornsby, a white pioneer who mistakes Cloud's redheaded wife for a captive.

Beautifully written and reminiscent of the oral tradition, Hundred in the Hand brings new depth and dimension to the story of the battle and the Lakota people.

©2007 Joseph M. Marshall III; (P)2008 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"Marshall has tapped into an old form and infused it with a slightly different brand of knowledge to produce a swift, compelling read. Simply put, if you like Westerns, you'll love this one." (Washington Post Book World)

What members say

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  • Geoffrey
  • Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • 01-07-12

How the West was Lost

A novel of great heart and truth, "Hundred in the Hand" absorbs us into the intimate details of the lives of a handful of Native Americans shortly before their final round-up and herding into camps. Like it's sequel "The Long Knives Are Crying", we are introduced to an old survivor of the real battles of Hundred in the Hand and to the Battle of Little Bighorn, who has taken his family on a pilgrimage to the monuments erected there to impress upon them two momentous victories over the hoards of relentlessly demanding Settlers and protecting Armies who were invading their land.
It is not a mawkish romance but a dignified telling of a passionate people with an ancient history and love of a land that held the souls of their nation. Although the future of the true American was irremediable, the strength of character and sense of belonging to a place, live free or die, his battle against the machines and the multitude of White culture coming to annihilate them for land and its' riches, the Native People have a brilliant, colourful and glorious history as told, in part, in these two moving, beautiful books.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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Outstanding Historical Fiction

A very compelling story from the Lakota perspective, leading up to the Fetterman fight. I've listened to this twice now, and will probably listen a third time. Very well written, and for me it is a real treat that it is read by the author.

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  • Laurel
  • Klamath Falls, OR, USA
  • 05-16-16

best narration I have ever heard

Where does Hundred in the Hand rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Interesting story; best narration using Native American voice for the Natives and non-native for the others. Has humor as well as a great story, it was like a movie in words.

Who was your favorite character and why?

all of the natives

Which character – as performed by Joseph M. Marshall and John Terry – was your favorite?

all were good, I can't choose

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

live the native perspective of the westward expansion,

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Not so entertaining

Would you try another book from Joseph M. Marshall and/or Joseph M. Marshall and John Terry ?

I won't buy any more. The story is long winded and the narration very flat and dull.

Has Hundred in the Hand turned you off from other books in this genre?

No, I love westerns and the Larry McMurtry books here are excellent.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

Lacking in every sense of the word. Every chapter read in the same flat, uninspiring tone, no highlighting dramatic events, no distinguishing between different characters.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

Interesting to hear the the story from the indians point of view.

Any additional comments?

An author isn't necessarily a good narrator!!

0 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Wendy
  • 06-01-14

Not for cowboys

Is this listed as fiction? Clearly an alternative view of the "wild" west (not exactly west!). I confess I am a fan of the author and enjoyed the telling of this story. The story gives insight into both "sides" views and reveals weaknesses as well as strengths. Get away from Ray Meers' How the Wild West was won ..... please.