Regular price: $34.22

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Ignatius Perrish spent the night drunk and doing terrible things. He woke up the next morning with a thunderous hangover, a raging headache, and a pair of horns growing from his temples. At first, Ig thought the horns were a hallucination, the product of a mind damaged by rage and grief. He had spent the last year in a lonely, private purgatory, following the death of his beloved, Merrin Williams, who was raped and murdered under inexplicable circumstances. A mental breakdown would have been the most natural thing in the world. But there was nothing natural about the horns, which were all too real.

Once the righteous Ig had enjoyed the life of the blessed: born into privilege, the second son of a renowned musician and younger brother of a rising late-night TV star, he had security, wealth, and a place in his community. Ig had it all, and more—he had Merrin and a love founded on shared daydreams, mutual daring, and unlikely midsummer magic. But Merrin's death damned all that. The only suspect in the crime, Ig was never charged or tried. And he was never cleared. In the court of public opinion in Gideon, New Hampshire, Ig is and always will be guilty because his rich and connected parents pulled strings to make the investigation go away. Nothing Ig can do, nothing he can say, matters. Everyone, it seems, including God, has abandoned him. Everyone, that is, but the devil inside.

Now Ig is possessed of a terrible new power to go with his terrible new look—a macabre talent he intends to use to find the monster who killed Merrin and destroyed his life. Being good and praying for the best got him nowhere. It's time for a little revenge. It's time the devil had his due.

©2010 Joe Hill (P)2010 HarperCollins Publishers

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    1,457
  • 4 Stars
    1,103
  • 3 Stars
    392
  • 2 Stars
    96
  • 1 Stars
    60

Performance

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    1,475
  • 4 Stars
    821
  • 3 Stars
    200
  • 2 Stars
    43
  • 1 Stars
    23

Story

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    1,245
  • 4 Stars
    859
  • 3 Stars
    336
  • 2 Stars
    90
  • 1 Stars
    45
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Larry
  • Watersmeet, MI, United States
  • 02-25-10

Its a hoot.

I can think of a number of ways it could haved ended for Lee, but Joe Hill had other ideas. Yes the ending was a bit weird, but the story for much of the time is an absolute hoot when Ig crosses paths with people. I thought Fred Berman did an outstanding narration of the book.

7 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

On the Horns of a Dilemma - The Devil You Know

The dilemma is whether to give Horns 4 stars or 5.

Joe Hill is a great writer. Heart Shaped Box was brilliant, and Horns doesn't disappoint. The book has much symbolism and irony. It's loaded with devil-related imagery. The guy who looks like the devil really isn't, and everyone who looks angelic really isn't. Ig's father and brother play horns (instruments), but Ig's asthma precludes him from doing so, even though he yearns to do so. In the end, his horns break through.

The only irritating thing about the book is the lack of clear chapter transitions. The story is told from Ig's point of view, but it isn't always clear initially whether what is being related is the current story set in realtime, or whether it's a flashback. The realtime story extends throughout and chronicles the day Ig wakes up and discovers he has horns and their effect on those around him. The flashbacks relate to pivotal moments in Ig's past -- those he knows about first hand, and those which he doesn't know about. The flashbacks are disordered, but they provide tidbits of insight and explanation of significant events.

Joe Hill does a great job with characters, dialogue and description generally. His descriptions are vivid and evocative without descending into parody. He has Stephen King's brilliant gift for the inner monologue.

This is a thriller with a twist. It's not really horror, but there are some neat supernatural or paranormal elements. It's an interesting look at what people are really thinking as Ig's horns seem to have the power to make people use their outside voices for what are very much inside voice thoughts.

If you want to be really literary about it, there are themes of death and resurrection, blindness and vision, faith and faithlessness, and hope and redemption.

But mostly it's just a great and very vivid story about a guy who unexpectedly grows horns and then seeks the truth about and revenge for the death of his former girlfriend.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Whew! Tough one to write a review for . . .

I've read Road Rage and 20th Century Ghosts - loved them. I own Heart-Shaped Box and have been trying to get through it for a couple of years with no success. I have heard great things about NOS4A2 and want to read it, but I was able to get a discounted copy of Horns. So I did.

I must admit, the first 1/3 to 1/2 of the book was hard work. There were a great many moments of very interesting reading, but they didn't seem to be coming to any kind of reasonable point. I did consider giving up and going on to something I knew I'd enjoy - but I stuck it out. I am glad I did! The myriad of short, clever anecdotes began to weave themselves into a pattern. I not only knew the characters, I knew their motivations and how the events of their lives had shaped them into the adults that were making the big decisions and acting/reacting to the (admittedly) weird *stuff* that was happening around them. For those who get a bit bored, hang in there. For those who think there are (a) too many characters or that (b) the book is too long: (a) they are ALL vital parts of the story and it would be diminished if any of them were edited out, and (b) Get Real! No matter what format you read a book in there are ways of telling its length in advance.

Joe Hill is not his father and anyone looking for SK will be disappointed. Joe Hill is a very good writer in his own right, he is much darker and his characters live extremely complicated lives (if only inside their own heads). I am not giving this book five stars because it is not Great Literature, but I am giving it a solid four stars because it is fresh, interesting and a very good read - giving the reader lots of things to think about once the book has been finished.

Enjoy!

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Krusty?

Seriously, Fred Berman sounds just like Krusty the Klown and that's not a good thing. Joe Hill's book is OK, but that's about it. The idea is good and he did a nice job of handling the story from multiple perspectives and slowly revealing the important details, allowing the story to come to light piece by piece and not all at once. The problem (besides the narrator that sounds like Krusty) is that the whole thing feels very superficial and unpolished. A previous reviewer wrote that it was like a short story that got stretched and I think that's reasonably close to my interpretation. It isn't a bad book, so I disagree with those who give it one star. Go back and try to slog through Mary Shelly's Frankenstien for a truly awful read. As for the "Christian" reviewers who worry that "Christians" won't like the book; well, it's a book about a devil. That should be reasonably apparent from the title and cover art.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

He's come of age!

This is by far Joe Hill's best work yet. I hope he keeps rolling in this direction. He's distinguished himself apart from his father and is now officially the second best writer in the family.

5 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Another Terrific Book by Hill

Terrific book, terrific narrator!

5 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Great story, but...

Joe, you are a great writer, and this book is much better than your last one, but the ending really needed to be better written. It's like, you lay out this great story, give it plot twists and charactor developements that carry me along, then it seems you needed to wrap it up and rushed the ending with a quick fix-it-all. I still enjoyed it though. It's worth the credit.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A chip off the old block

Joe can weave tales that take you away to other places. This was a tale of horrible loss, murder, insanity, and the devil on all of us. It has a bittersweet ending that leaves you with a bit of hope. Another book well done, much like his father has written.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

awesome

loved it! I never really like audible books but this one was great. I like it more than the movie.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • M
  • 11-13-17

Slightly better

You can tell that the author is Stephen King’s son. Their style is similar, but joe Hill is better. The story itself was ok. The characters were strong, but the story was weak. AUDIBLE 20 REVIEW SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY