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Publisher's Summary

Jack London's masterpiece, tells the gripping tale of a dog named Buck who is wrenched out of his life of ease and luxury to become a sled dog in Alaska. Drawing on his wolf heritage, Buck must fight for survival in an alien environment.

Public Domain (P)2014 Trout Lake Media

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Great Introductory Literature; Lousy Production

I might have read 'Call of the Wild' in high school--I can't remember. If I did, surely I dismissed it as bothersome homework that wasn't as exciting as video games.

Two-plus decades later, I now find COTW way more exciting than video games. London's delivery is just great, following the trials of Buck and his indomitable spirit from California ranch dog to Alaskan free-range wolf. From the violent gold-rushers to the disciplined postal routes to the ignorant family and the love of John Thorton, every episode is a slice of the human condition--for better or worse--creatively told from the canine perspective.

The production of this title is very poor--the spliced recording has seams and the fidelity of the narrator has too much bass--but the narrator (Munro? Husmann? Artwork and metadata have conflicting information) does have moments of excellence: the scenes of Dave's death and the snowshoe rabbit rise to the top.

"There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive. This ecstasy, this forgetfulness of living, comes to the artist, caught up and out of himself in a sheet of flame; it comes to the soldier, war-mad on a stricken field and refusing quarter; and it came to Buck, leading the pack, sounding the old wolf-cry, straining after the food that was alive and that fled swiftly before him through the moonlight. He was sounding the deeps of his nature, and of the parts of his nature that were deeper than he, going back into the womb of Time. He was mastered by the sheer surging of life, the tidal wave of being, the perfect joy of each separate muscle, joint, and sinew in that it was everything that was not death, that it was aglow and rampant, expressing itself in movement, flying exultantly under the stars and over the face of dead matter that did not move." --Jack London, Call of the Wild

This book is a simple, terrific introduction to American literature and deserves a better recording. But hey, I found this on Audible for 50 cents--it was pocket change well spent.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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Speak up!

unlistenable...the reader has a pleasant, deep voice but he whispers like he's trying to put a child to sleep. I was unable to fully understand what he was saying.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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great story, but not the best narration

really liked this book. the narration was not the best, but for the price I'd listen to Richard Simmons read it.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Enter the Wild

Jack London's incredible story of Buck and his adventures in the Alaskan wilderness a classic for very good read. This should be required reading for anyone who loves dogs, or just animals in general as you'll definitely look at nature differently afterwards. I really can't recommend this highly enough.

That said, this audio performance leaves a lot to be desired. Alan Munro rarely strays from a dull monotone and has a naturally raspy voice. That, coupled with a poorly edited recording makes parts of this very hard to follow. Do yourself a favor and read this instead listening to it. It's too good a story for anything to stand in your way.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Brian
  • Chandler, AZ, United States
  • 05-26-16

Great story poorly read

This is a great book but the reading was so frustrating to listen to. The dialogue sections were good but the rest was almost monotone. The reader's voice is very low (bass) and often low (soft) with little fluctuation, making words indiscernible. My opinion.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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My Favorite Author of All time

I yearn to get out of the city and to get out of the 9-5 lifestyle so much that this book nearly makes me cry every time I read it.

Why? Because inside of us all is a forgotten, primitive existence that is just under the surface. And reading this book reminds me of that existence and I get a little happier inside knowing that I'm connected to my ancestors on a level that I can't explain.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Terrible narration

I doubt very much the story is bad, jack London is a great author. Find another narrator though. This one reads each sentence as two. Slow and haltingly with too many pauses. I couldn't get five minutes in before I gave up.

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Extraordinary story, a must read.

This is an extraordinary unique story. The life of a huge, strong, fearless loving dog.

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A Tuff Read For A Dog Lover!

Buck Is The Honest And Trustworth Friend You Wish You Had. A Protected Of The Loved Ones With Him. A Relentless Threat To His Protagonist. Really Nice Ending!!!
Ruff Low And Majestic Highs.

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  • amy
  • bahrain, Bahrain
  • 11-21-17

Great book, slightly bizarre narration

Wonderfully crafted hugely evocative story with slightly odd rather stilted almost staccato narration. At times it worked with its definition, but at others it detracted from the flow.

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  • chloeT
  • 02-17-16

put together from a library of recorded words

I remember this to be a great story, however I couldn't even get through the first chapter as the "reading" was so terrible. A computer has put recorded words in the right order, however there is no flow or intonation and its is unpleasant to listen to as a result. Don't waste your money.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 02-22-16

A classic

All that made Jack London a great writer is neatly encapsulated in this story. Shorn of all anthropomorphised saccharined nonsense, it is truly moving.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • janien
  • 11-07-16

A stunning wild classic

What made the experience of listening to The Call of the Wild the most enjoyable?

Overall a good presentation and easy to listen to. This is a short classic which perhaps would have fitted into a young adult genre, had that existed when it was published in the early 1900s.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Buck and John Thornton are both favourites. The dog Buck is a wonderful character and the story written from his perspective is beautiful. Yes harsh at times but the reality of life at that time. Not over the top in its depiction of brutality so suitable for all including devoted dog owners such as myself! John Thornton is a kind man in amongst others who are not. All dog lovers can appreciate the bond between man and beloved pooch.

What about Alan Munro’s performance did you like?

A good performance by Alan Munro. I had to keep my iPad closer to me whilst listening than usual as the presentation is slightly quieter than others from audible. Only a minor criticism though.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes and no! I wanted to savour it! The language is stunning.

Any additional comments?

Jack London is an author I will explore more. His writing is beautiful. Classic literature at its best and easily understood. Thoroughly recommended.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • ANGELA SOLOMON
  • 03-07-17

Buck's freedom

I enjoyed this story especially the section where Buck was running with the wolf so free and happy. I could visualise the countryside.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Louisa
  • 04-09-17

Goodness me this is dull and so badly read

Jack London is so famous that when this was on special offer, I thought I'd give it a go - but really, it's rather dull and really badly read - I think it must be an old recording because the quality is not brilliant either. It tells the story of a dog who lives in Alaska and who drags sleights across snow and various things happen to him - most of them rather bad! But it is quite short and so if you feel you need to explore London without too much effort this might be worth the money. Perhaps, following the advice of Uncle Matthew, White Fang is better!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • miss
  • 02-27-17

I loved this audiobook

I loved this audiobook, the story is fantastic and very sad at times. The narration is perfect.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Combat Wombat
  • 02-20-17

Wonderful story. Terrible narration.

If this book wasn’t for you, who do you think might enjoy it more?

The call of the wild is a wonderful story.<br/>The narrator makes it illiterate.<br/>"He allowed the majors boys to ride on his back." Is read as<br/>"He allowed<br/>The majors boys<br/>To ride <br/>On<br/>his back."<br/>

How did the narrator detract from the book?

He could not narrate.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Wras
  • 04-27-15

Humans inhumanity is all too human.

Buck a domesticated dog is stolen for use during the gold rush in the Yukon; use is not a word I use lightly here, enslaved would begin to describe it better. This is not a childrens book by any standard; the description of cruelty of humans towards animals is brutal and unrelenting, also the descriptions of the survival of the fittest is not restricted in any way, expect gore and cruelty in bucket loads.
This is a tale of adventure and survival, that takes you into a world where nature is king and master of men and animals, one mistake one miscalculation and your life is gone.
I finished this short book in one sitting and enjoyed the resilience of buck but found some of the violence a bit disturbing.
The reader is good but puts little inflection on his voice I found that speeding the voice made it better to listen to.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

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  • P
  • 12-02-17

Buck

Just so easy to follow.
A poetic tale that sets the scenes beautifully.
Perfect for car journeys and travelling.

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  • ShoeDoodles
  • 11-15-17

Fab story

I loved the story but for me it was difficult to follow because the reader read it very differently to how I would have.

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  • Ryan
  • 01-14-17

A Classic

A terrific novel by Jack London. Alan Munro's interpretation of some voices is quite interesting but has a warm tone overall. Highly recommended.